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Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change (2010)

Chapter: Appendix C: Comparison of CO2 Emissions for States Versus National, United States, in 1999 and 2000

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Comparison of CO2 Emissions for States Versus National, United States, in 1999 and 2000." National Research Council. 2010. Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12784.
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APPENDIX C
Comparison of CO2Emissions for States Versus National, United States, in 1999 and 2000

Rank

National or Subnational Jurisdication

MMTCE

1

United States

1528.7

2

China (Mainland)

761.59

3

Russian Federation

391.66

4

Japan

323.28

5

India

292.27

6

Germany

214.39

7

Texas

181.11

8

United Kingdon

154.98

9

Canada

118.96

10

Italy (Including San Marino)

116.86

11

Republic of Korea

116.54

12

Mexico

115.71

13

Saudi Arabia

102.17

14

California

99.52

15

France (Including Monaco)

98.92

16

Australia

94.09

17

Ukraine

93.55

18

South Africa

89.32

19

Islamic Republic of Iran

84.69

20

Brazil

83.93

21

Poland

82.25

22

Spain

77.22

23

Pennsylvania

74.28

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Comparison of CO2 Emissions for States Versus National, United States, in 1999 and 2000." National Research Council. 2010. Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12784.
×

Rank

National or Subnational Jurisdication

MMTCE

24

Indonesia

73.57

25

Ohio

71.49

26

Florida

64.28

27

Indiana

63.95

28

Illinois

63.13

29

Turkey

60.47

30

Taiwan

57.99

31

New York

57.86

32

Lousiana

56.83

33

Thailand

54.22

34

Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

51.54

35

Michigan

51.46

36

Georgia

44.93

37

Venezuela

43.05

38

Kentucky

39.97

39

North Carolina

39.86

40

Malaysia

39.41

41

Egypt

38.82

42

Netherlands

37.9

43

Argentina

37.72

44

Alabama

37.62

45

Tennessee

34.34

46

New Jersey

34.14

47

Missouri

33.95

48

Kazakhstan

33.1

49

Czech Republic

32.42

50

Uzbekistan

32.38

51

West Virginia

30.81

NOTE: MMTCE, million metric tons of carbon equivalent.

SOURCES: World data from Marland et al. (2003); U.S. state data from EPA (2004).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Comparison of CO2 Emissions for States Versus National, United States, in 1999 and 2000." National Research Council. 2010. Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12784.
×
Page 311
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Comparison of CO2 Emissions for States Versus National, United States, in 1999 and 2000." National Research Council. 2010. Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12784.
×
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Global climate change is one of America's most significant long-term policy challenges. Human activity--especially the use of fossil fuels, industrial processes, livestock production, waste disposal, and land use change--is affecting global average temperatures, snow and ice cover, sea-level, ocean acidity, growing seasons and precipitation patterns, ecosystems, and human health. Climate-related decisions are being carried out by almost every agency of the federal government, as well as many state and local government leaders and agencies, businesses and individual citizens. Decision makers must contend with the availability and quality of information, the efficacy of proposed solutions, the unanticipated consequences resulting from decisions, the challenge of implementing chosen actions, and must consider how to sustain the action over time and respond to new information.

Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change, a volume in the America's Climate Choices series, describes and assesses different activities, products, strategies, and tools for informing decision makers about climate change and helping them plan and execute effective, integrated responses. It discusses who is making decisions (on the local, state, and national levels), who should be providing information to make decisions, and how that information should be provided. It covers all levels of decision making, including international, state, and individual decision making. While most existing research has focused on the physical aspect of climate change, Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change employs theory and case study to describe the efforts undertaken so far, and to guide the development of future decision-making resources.

Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change offers much-needed guidance to those creating public policy and assists in implementing that policy. The information presented in this book will be invaluable to the research community, especially social scientists studying climate change; practitioners of decision-making assistance, including advocacy organizations, non-profits, and government agencies; and college-level teachers and students.

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