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Suggested Citation:"Selected References." National Research Council. 2010. Certifiably Sustainable?: The Role of Third-Party Certification Systems: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12805.
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Selected References

Auld, G., S. Bernstein, and B. Cashore. 2008a. The New Corporate Social Responsibility. Annual Review of Environment and Resources 33:413-35.

Auld, G., L.H. Gulbrandsen and C.L. McDermott. 2008b. Certification Schemes and the Impacts on Forests and Forestry. Annual Review of Environment and Resources 33:187-211.

Berry, W. 1981. The Gift of Good Land: Further Essays Cultural & Agricultural. San Francisco: North Point Press.

Blueyou AG and ENDA/REPAO. 2007. Feasibility Study: Eco-labelling of Artisanal Coastal Fisheries in Senegal. Zurich and Dakar.

Cashore, B., G. Auld, and D. Newsom. 2004. Governing Through Markets: Forest Certification and the Emergence of Non-State Authority. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Czech, B., P.R. Krausman, and P.K. Devers. 2000. Economic associations among causes of species endangerment in the United States. Bioscience 50:593-601.

DHHS (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). 1988. The Surgeon General’s Report on Nutrition and Health. DHHS (PHS) Publication No. 88-50210.

Dimitri, C. and L. Oberholtzer. 2005. Market-Led Versus Government-Facilitated Growth, Development of the U.S. and EU Organic Agricultural Sectors. Economic Research Service, USDA. 2005.

DOE (U.S. Department of Energy). 2008. Buildings Energy Data Book 2008. Washington, DC: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

Ellis, K. and J. Keane. 2008. A Review of Ethical Standards and Labels: Is there a gap in the market for a new ‘Good for Development’ label? ODI Working Paper, November. Overseas Development Institute, London.

Giovannucci, D. and J. Potts. 2008. Seeking Sustainability: COSA Preliminary Analysis of Sustainability Initiatives in the Coffee Sector. Winnipeg, Canada: International Institute for Sustainable Development.

Gulbrandsen, L.H. 2005. Marks of Sustainability? Challenges for Fishery and Forestry Eco-labeling. Environment 47(5):8-23.

Suggested Citation:"Selected References." National Research Council. 2010. Certifiably Sustainable?: The Role of Third-Party Certification Systems: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12805.
×

Jaffe, D. 2007. Brewing Justice: Fair Trade Coffee, Sustainability and Survival. University of California Press.

Johnson, R. 2008. Organic Agriculture in the United States: Program and Policy Issues. CRS Report for Congress. November.

Keunkel, P., V. Fricke, and S. Cholakova. 2009. The Common Code for the Coffee Community (4C). In: Enhancing the Effectiveness of Partnerships for Sustainability. National Research Council. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Lebel, L. and S. Lorek. 2008. Enabling Sustainable Production-Consumption Systems. Annual Review of Environment and Resources 33:241-275.

Levi, M. 2003. Fair Trade: A Cup at a Time. Politics & Society 31(3):407-432.

Moore, G. 2004. The Fair Trade Movement: Parameters, Issues and Future Research. Journal of Business Ethics 53:73-86.

MSC (Marine Stewardship Council). 2008. Annual Report 2007/08. London: Marine Stewardship Council.

NMI (Natural Marketing Institute). 2008. The LOHAS Report: Consumers and Sustainability.

NRC (National Research Council). 1989. Diet and Health: Implications for Reducing Chronic Disease Risk. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

NRC. 1990. Nutrition Labeling: Issues and Directions for the 1990s. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

NRC. 1992. Food Labeling: Toward National Uniformity. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

NRC. 1999. Our Common Journey. Board on Sustainable Development, Policy Division. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

NRC. 2003. Dietary Reference Intakes: Guiding Principles for Nutrition Labeling and Fortification. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

NRC. 2006. Linking Knowledge with Action for Sustainable Development: The Role of Program Management, Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

NRC. 2009. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Partnerships for Sustainability: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Organic Trade Association (OTA). The Organic Trade Association’s 2007 Manufacturer Survey, Summary [Conducted by Packaged Facts].

Parikh, P. 2003. Harnessing Consumer Power: Using Certification Systems to Promote Good Governance. Washington, DC: Environmental Law Institute.

Ponte, S. 2006. Ecolabels and fish trade: Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification and the South African hake industry. TRALAC Working Paper 9/2006. Trade Law Centre for Southern Africa: Stellenbosch, South Africa.

Rametsteiner, E. and M. Simula. 2003. Forest certification—an instrument to promote sustainable forest management? Journal of Environmental Management 67(1):87-98.

Raynolds, L.T. 2002. Consumer/Producer Links in Fair Trade Coffee Networks. Sociologia Ruralis 42(4):404-424, European Society for Rural Sociology.

Speth, J.G. 2004. Red Sky at Morning: America and the Crisis of the Global Environment. Yale University Press.

Thilmany, D. 2006. The US Organic Industry: Important Trends and Emerging Issues for the USDA. Agribusiness Marketing Report 06-01, Colorado State University.

UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and Development). 2008. Making Certification Work for Sustainable Development: The case of Biofuels. New York and Geneva: United Nations.

USC-OTA (U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment). 1992. Global Standards: Building Blocks for the Future. TCT-512, Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Suggested Citation:"Selected References." National Research Council. 2010. Certifiably Sustainable?: The Role of Third-Party Certification Systems: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12805.
×

USDA/ERS (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service). 2002. Recent Growth Patterns in the U.S. Organic Foods Market, AIB777. September.

Vandergeest, P. 2007. Certification and Communities: Alternatives for Regulating the Environmental and Social Impacts of Shrimp Farming 35(7):1152-1171.

van Kooten, Cornelis, G., H.W. Nelson, and I. Vertinsky. 2005. Certification of sustainable forest management practices: a global perspective on why countries certify. Forest Policy and Economics, 7(6):857-867.

Vogel, D. 2008. Private Global Business Regulation. Annual Review of Political Science. 11:261-82.

Watson, R. 2008. Green Building Impact Report 2008. Greener World Media.

Wellson, A.J., ed. 2007. Organic Agriculture in the U.S. New York: Nova Science Publishers.

SELECTED WEB SITES

4C Association for a better coffee world

American National Standards Institute—ANSI

Forest Stewardship Council, Global

ISEAL Alliance

Marine Stewardship Council

TransFair USA

USDA National Organics Program

U.S. Federal Trade Commission “Green Guides”

USGBC LEED Rating Systems

Suggested Citation:"Selected References." National Research Council. 2010. Certifiably Sustainable?: The Role of Third-Party Certification Systems: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12805.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Selected References." National Research Council. 2010. Certifiably Sustainable?: The Role of Third-Party Certification Systems: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12805.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Selected References." National Research Council. 2010. Certifiably Sustainable?: The Role of Third-Party Certification Systems: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12805.
×
Page 74
Suggested Citation:"Selected References." National Research Council. 2010. Certifiably Sustainable?: The Role of Third-Party Certification Systems: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12805.
×
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"Selected References." National Research Council. 2010. Certifiably Sustainable?: The Role of Third-Party Certification Systems: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12805.
×
Page 76
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Consumption of goods and services represents a growing share of global economic activity. In the United States, consumption accounts for more than two-thirds of gross domestic product. This trend of increasing consumption has brought with it negative consequences for the environment and human well-being. Global demand for energy, food, and all manner of goods is on the rise, putting strains on the natural and human capital required to produce them. Extractive industries and production processes are prominent causes of species endangerment. Modern economies are underpinned by substantial energy consumption, a primary contributor to the current climate crisis. Expanding international trade has led to many economic opportunities, but has also contributed to unfair labor practices and wealth disparities.

While certain processes have improved or become more efficient, and certain practices have been outlawed or amended, the sheer scale of global consumption and its attendant impacts continue to be major challenges we face in the transition to sustainability. Third-party certification systems have emerged over the last 15 years as a tool with some promise. There has been anecdotal evidence of success, but to date the overall impact of certified goods and services has been small. Moreover, definitions of sustainable vary across sectors and markets, and rigorous assessments of these programs have been few and far between.

In order to take a step in learning from this field of practice, the National Academies' Science and Technology for Sustainability Program held a workshop to illuminate the decision making process of those who purchase and produce certified goods and services. It was also intended to help clarify the scope and limitations of the scientific knowledge that might contribute to the economic success of certified products. The workshop, summarized in this volume, involved presentations and discussions with approximately 40 invited experts from academia, business, government, and nongovernmental organizations.

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