National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: References
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×

Appendix A
Workshop Agenda

Workshop on the Role of Language in School Learning: Implications for Closing the Achievement Gap


October 15-16, 2009


AGENDA

Location:

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

 

Mariposa Lily Room

 

2121 Sand Hill Road

 

Menlo Park, CA

Goals: To explore the state of knowledge about aspects of language development that are critical to learning in K-12 classrooms and that may contribute to observed achievement disparities; to explore the state of knowledge on approaches to instruction that help students develop language for academic achievement; and to identify priorities for research and dissemination given the current state of knowledge.

Guiding Questions

  • What aspects of language development are critical for academic learning in K-12 classrooms? Why do these developments matter both in the early years of formal schooling (K-3) and for master-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×

ing specialized language- and literacy-intensive subject matter in the later elementary grades and beyond?

  • What individual differences in language experiences and abilities do students bring to K-12 education? Do these differences help to explain observed disparities in school achievement?

  • What do research findings suggest about how to intervene in pre-K and K-12 classrooms to develop aspects of language needed for school achievement? What is known about how to measure progress?

  • What are the most urgent priorities for research, from basic and translational science to dissemination research? In particular, what still needs to be understood about: (1) aspects of language needed for learning academic subjects, (2) effects of language differences on achievement gaps, and (3) instructional approaches or other interventions that develop essential language capacities for academic learning K-12 classrooms?

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009

8:00–8:30

Welcoming Remarks

Kenji Hakuta (Committee Chair), Stanford University

Barbara Chow, Education Program Director, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

8:30–10:30

Panel 1: Vocabulary and Academic Language

Moderator: Claude Goldenberg (Committee Member), Stanford University

Presenters:

Erika Hoff, Florida Atlantic University

Mary Schleppegrell, University of Michigan

Commissioned Papers:

Erika Hoff, Do Vocabulary Differences Explain Achievement Gaps and Can Vocabulary-Targeted Interventions Close Them?

Mary Schleppegrell, Language in Academic Subject Areas and Classroom Instruction: What Is Academic Language and How Can We Teach It?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×

 

Respondents:

Nonie Lesaux, Harvard University Aída Walqui, WestEd

Open Discussion

10:30–10:45

Break

10:45–12:45

Panel 2: Preschool Language Experiences and Interventions: Linkages to K-3 Learning and Achievement

Moderator: Lynne Vernon-Feagans (Committee Member), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Presenters:

David Dickinson, Vanderbilt University

Carol Scheffner Hammer, Temple University

Commissioned Papers:

David Dickinson and Jill Freiberg, Environmental Factors Affecting Language Acquisition from Birth to Five: Implications for Literacy Development and Intervention

Carol Hammer, Dual-Language Learners’ Early Language Development and Academic Outcomes

Respondents:

Jill de Villiers, Smith College

Roberta Golinkoff, University of Delaware

Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Temple University

Mariela Páez, Boston College

Open Discussion

12:45–1:30

Lunch and discussion on Panel 1 and 2 presentations

1:30–3:50

Panel 3: Explicit Instruction, Language Transfer, and Relations Between Oral Language and Literacy

Moderator: Fred Genesee (Committee Member), McGill University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×

 

Presenters:

Robert Bayley, University of California, Davis

Aydin Durgunoğlu, University of Minnesota, Duluth

John Rickford, Stanford University

Commissioned Papers:

Robert Bayley, Explicit Formal Instruction in Oral Language: English-Language Learners

John Rickford and Walter Wolfram, Explicit Formal Instruction in Oral Language as a Second Dialect

Aydin Durgunoğlu, Effects of First Language Oral Proficiency on Second-Language (reading) Comprehension

Respondents:

Susanna Dutro, E.L. Achieve

Guadalupe Valdés, Stanford University

Open Discussion

3:50–4:00

Break

4:00–5:00

Discussion of Themes from the Day’s Presentations

Moderator: Kenji Hakuta (Committee Chair), Stanford University

Open Discussion

5:00

Adjourn

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2009

9:00–11:00

Panel 4: Language Deficits and Differences: Past and Future

Moderator: Jill de Villiers (Committee Member), Smith College

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×

 

Presenters:

William Labov (Committee Member), University of Pennsylvania

Guadelupe Valdés, Stanford University

Commissioned Papers:

William Labov and Anne Charity Hudley, Symbolic and Structural Effects of Dialects and Immigrant Minority Languages in Explaining Achievement Gaps

Guadelupe Valdés, Jeff MacSwan, and Laura Alvarez, Deficits and Differences: Perspectives on Language and Education

Respondents:

Robert Bayley, University of California, Davis

Lisa Green, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Otto Santa Ana, University of California, Los Angeles

Open Discussion

11:00–11:15

Break

11:15–12:15

Discussion of Papers in Light of Emergent Themes and Guiding Questions

Moderator: Kenji Hakuta (Committee Chair), Stanford University

Committee Member Respondents:

Jill de Villiers, Smith College

Claude Goldenberg, Stanford University

William Labov, University of Pennsylvania

Open Discussion

12:15–1:15

Lunch and continued discussion of the papers

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×

1:15–2:45

Practical Steps to Advance Research and Dissemination

Guiding Questions

  • What research is needed to determine the role that particular language capacities play in academic learning, especially for certain subgroups that experience lower academic achievement?

  • What instructional approaches or principles emerge from the research for supporting the development of language needed for academic achievement; which of these are ready to move into practice? What translational research is still needed to meet the needs of today’s students and classrooms?

  • What syntheses could be undertaken to inform practice or a research agenda, including topics not covered in this workshop?

  • What entities might play a role in these research funding, synthesis, and dissemination efforts?

 

Moderator: Kenji Hakuta (Committee Chair), Stanford University

 

Committee Member Respondents:

Donna Christian, Center for Applied Linguistics

Fred Genesee, McGill University

Lynne Vernon-Feagans, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

 

Open Discussion

2:45–3:00

Summation and Closing Remarks

Kenji Hakuta (Committee Chair), Stanford University

3:00

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×
Page 98
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×
Page 100
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×
Page 101
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2010. Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12907.
×
Page 102
Next: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members and Staff »
Language Diversity, School Learning, and Closing Achievement Gaps: A Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $41.00 Buy Ebook | $32.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The Workshop on the Role of Language in School Learning: Implications for Closing the Achievement Gap was held to explore three questions: What is known about the conditions that affect language development? What are the effects of early language development on school achievement? What instructional approaches help students meet school demands for language and reading comprehension? Of particular interest was the degree to which group differences in school achievement might be attributed to language differences, and whether language-related instruction might help to close gaps in achievement by helping students cope with language-intensive subject matter especially after the 3rd grade.

The workshop provided a forum for researchers and practitioners to review and discuss relevant research findings from varied perspectives. The disciplines and professions represented included: language development, child development, cognitive psychology, linguistics, reading, educationally disadvantaged student populations, literacy in content areas (math, science, social studies), and teacher education. The aim of the meeting was not to reach consensus or provide recommendations, but rather to offer expert insight into the issues that surround the study of language, academic learning, and achievement gaps, and to gather varied viewpoints on what available research findings might imply for future research and practice. This book summarizes and synthesizes two days of workshop presentations and discussion.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!