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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Summary Overview of Meaningful Use Objectives." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Digital Infrastructure for the Learning Health System: The Foundation for Continuous Improvement in Health and Health Care: Workshop Series Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12912.
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D

Summary Overview of Meaningful Use Objectives

Summary Overview of Meaningful Use Objectives
Objective Measure
Core set of objectives to be achieved by all eligible professionals, hospitals, and critical access hospitals to qualify for incentive payments
Record patient demographics (sex, race, ethnicity, date of birth, preferred language, and in the case of hospitals, date and preliminary cause in the event of death) Over 50% of patients’ demographic data recorded as structured data
Record vital signs and chart changes (height, weight, blood pressure, body mass index, growth charts for children) Over 50% of patients 2 years of age or older have height, weight, and blood pressure recorded as structured data
Maintain up-to-date problem list of current and active diagnoses Over 80% of patients have at least one entry recorded as structured data
Maintain active medication list Over 80% of patients have at least one entry recorded as structured data
Maintain active medication allergy list Over 80% of patients have at least one entry recorded as structured data
Record smoking status for patients 13 years of age or older Over 50% of patients 13 years of age or older have smoking status recorded as structured data
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Summary Overview of Meaningful Use Objectives." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Digital Infrastructure for the Learning Health System: The Foundation for Continuous Improvement in Health and Health Care: Workshop Series Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12912.
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Summary Overview of Meaningful Use Objectives
Objective Measure
For individual professionals, provide patients with clinical summaries for each office visit; for hospitals, provide an electronic copy of hospital discharge instructions on request Clinical summaries provided to patients for over 50% of all office visits within 3 business days; over 50% of all patients who are discharged from the inpatient department or emergency department of an eligible hospital or critical access hospital and who request an electronic copy of their discharge instructions are provided with it
On request, provide patients with an electronic copy of their health information (including diagnostic-test results, problem list, medication lists, medication allergies, and for hospitals, discharge summary and procedures) Over 50% of requesting patients receive electronic copy within 3 business days
Generate and transmit permissible prescriptions electronically (does not apply to hospitals) Over 40% are transmitted electronically using certified EHR technology
Computer provider order entry (CPOE) for medication orders Over 30% of patients with at least one medication in their medication list have at least one medication ordered through CPOE
Implement drug–drug and drug–allergy interaction checks Functionality is enabled for these checks for the entire reporting period
Implement capability to electronically exchange key clinical information among providers and patient-authorized entities Perform at least one test of EHR’s capacity to electronically exchange information
Implement one clinical decision support rule and ability to track compliance with the rule One clinical decision support rule implemented
Implement systems to protect privacy and security of patient data in the EHR Conduct or review a security risk analysis, implement security updates as necessary, and correct identified security deficiencies
Report clinical quality measures to CMS or states For 2011, provide aggregate numerator and denominator through attestation; for 2012, electronically submit measures
Reproduced with permission from Blumenthal, D., and M. Tavenner. 2010. The “meaningful use” regulation for electronic health records. New England Journal of Medicine 363(6):501-504.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Summary Overview of Meaningful Use Objectives." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Digital Infrastructure for the Learning Health System: The Foundation for Continuous Improvement in Health and Health Care: Workshop Series Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12912.
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Page 279
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Summary Overview of Meaningful Use Objectives." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Digital Infrastructure for the Learning Health System: The Foundation for Continuous Improvement in Health and Health Care: Workshop Series Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12912.
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Page 280
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Like many other industries, health care is increasingly turning to digital information and the use of electronic resources. The Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care hosted three workshops to explore current efforts and opportunities to accelerate progress in improving health and health care with information technology systems.

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