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Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles (2011)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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A
Committee Biographies

Trevor O. Jones (NAE), Chair is founder, chairman, and chief executive officer (CEO) of ElectroSonics Medical, Inc. Before that, he was founder, chairman, and CEO of Biomec, Incorporated, a biomedical device company. He was formerly chairman of the board of Echlin, Incorporated, a supplier of automotive components, primarily to the aftermarket. Dr. Jones is also chairman and CEO of the International Development Corporation, a private management consulting company that advises automotive supplier companies on strategy and technology. He was chair, president, and CEO (retired) of Libbey-Owens-Ford Company, a large manufacturer of glass for automotive and construction applications. Previously, he served as vice president of engineering in the Automotive Worldwide Sector of TRW, Incorporated, and as group vice president, Transportation Electronics Group. Before joining TRW, he was employed by General Motors (GM) in many aerospace and automotive executive positions, including director of GM Proving Grounds; of the Delco Electronics Division, Automotive Electronic, and Safety Systems; and director of the GM Advanced Product Engineering Group. Dr. Jones is a life fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and has been cited for leadership in the application of electronics to the automobile. He is also a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), a fellow of the British Institution of Electrical Engineers, a fellow of the Engineering Society of Detroit, a registered professional engineer in Wisconsin, and a chartered engineer in the United Kingdom. He holds many patents and has lectured and written on automotive safety and electronics. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and a former commissioner of the National Research Council (NRC) Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems. Dr. Jones has served on several other NRC study committees, including the Committee for a Strategic Transportation Research Study on Highway Safety. He chaired the NAE Steering Committee on the Impact of Products Liability Law on Innovation and the Committee on Review of the Research Program of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles for six reviews. He holds a higher national certificate in electrical engineering from Aston Technical College and an ordinary national certificate in mechanical engineering from Liverpool Technical College. Cleveland State University awarded Dr. Jones an honorary doctorate of science and cited him for contributions in the development of fuel cells and biomedical devices.


Thomas W. Asmus (NAE) is a retired senior research executive of DaimlerChrysler Corporation. He has also held positions at Mead Corporation, as an adjunct faculty member of mechanical engineering at the University of Michigan, and as a professor of physical chemistry at the University of Guadalajara, in Mexico. He has more than 30 years of experience and has played a leadership role in nearly all aspects of internal combustion engine and fuels research and development, focusing mainly on fuel consumption and exhaust emissions reduction. His entry into the field was initially based on his background in combustion and emissions formation mechanisms for both gasoline and diesel engines, but with time and circumstances his activities expanded to include gas exchange processes, controls, lubrication, many types of fault diagnoses, and heat management. New-concept analysis has become routine for Dr. Asmus. Besides having been a member of the NAE, he is a fellow of the SAE and was a recipient of the Soichiro Honda Lecture Award recipient in 1999. He has a B.S. in paper science and engineering from Western Michigan University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Western Michigan University.


Rodica Baranescu (NAE) is a professor in the College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago. Before that, she was manager of the fuels, lubricants, and engine group of the International Truck and Engine Corporation, at Melrose Park, Illinois. She is an internationally sought after public speaker on technical issues related to mobility technology, environmental control, fuels, and energy. She has extensive expertise in diesel engine technology and was elected to the NAE in 2001 for research leading to effective and environmentally sensitive diesel and alternative-fuel engines

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

and leadership in automotive engineering. She is a fellow of SAE International and was its president in 2000. In 2003 she received the Internal Combustion Engine Award of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME). Dr. Baranescu received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering in 1961 and 1970, respectively, from the Politechnica University in Bucharest, Romania, where she served as assistant professor (1964-1968), lecturer (1970-1974), and associate professor (1974-1978).


Jay Baron is president of the Center for Automotive Research (CAR) and the director of its Manufacturing, Engineering and Technology Group. Dr. Baron’s recent research has focused on developing new methods for the analysis and validation of sheet metal processes, including die making, tool and die tryout, and sheet metal assembly processes. He also developed functional build procedures that result in lower tooling costs and shorter development lead times, while improving quality—particularly with sheet metal assemblies. He also has been researching new technologies in the auto industry, including looking at body shop design and flexibility and evaluating the manufacturing capability of evolving technologies. He recently completed investigations on state-of-the-art tailor-welded blank technologies, the economics of weld-bond adhesives, and the analysis of car door quality and construction methods. Before becoming first the director of manufacturing systems at CAR and then president, Dr. Baron was the manager of manufacturing systems at the Office for the Study of Automotive Transportation at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute. He also worked for Volkswagen of America in quality assurance and as staff engineer and project manager at the Industrial Technology Institute in Ann Arbor and at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Center for Manufacturing Productivity in Troy, New York. Dr. Baron holds a Ph.D. and a master’s degree in industrial and operations engineering from the University of Michigan and an M.B.A. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.


David Friedman is the research director of the Clean Vehicles Program of the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), Washington, D.C. He is the author or coauthor of more than 30 technical papers and reports on advancements in conventional, fuel cell, and hybrid electric vehicles and alternative energy sources with an emphasis on clean and efficient technologies. Before joining UCS in 2001, he worked for the University of California, Davis, in the fuel cell vehicle modeling program, developing simulation tools to evaluate fuel cell technology for automotive applications. He worked there on University of California’s FutureCar team to build a hybrid electric family car that doubled its fuel economy. He also once worked at Arthur D. Little researching fuel cell, battery electric, and hybrid electric vehicle technologies, as well as photovoltaics. He served as a member of the NRC Panel on the Benefits of Fuel Cell R&D of the Committee on Prospective Benefits of DOE’s Energy Efficiency and Fossil Energy R&D Programs, Phase 1, and is currently a member of the NRC Committee on National Tire Efficiency. He earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and is a doctoral candidate in transportation technology and policy at the University of California, Davis.


David Greene is a corporate fellow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He has spent more than 20 years researching transportation and energy policy issues. His research interests include energy demand modeling, economic analysis of petroleum dependence, modeling market responses to advanced transportation technologies and alternative—fuels, economic analysis of policies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, and developing theory and methods for measuring the sustainability of transportation systems. After joining ORNL in 1977, he founded the Transportation Energy Group in 1980 and in 1987 established the Transportation Research Section. Dr. Greene spent 1988 to 1989 in Washington, D.C., as a senior research analyst in the Office of Domestic and International Energy Policy, at the Department of Energy (DOE). He has published more than 150 articles in professional journals, written contributions to books and technical reports, and given congressional testimony on transportation and energy issues. From 1997 to 2000 Dr. Greene served as the first editor-in-chief of the Journal of Transportation and Statistics, the only scholarly periodical published by the U.S. Department of Transportation. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Transportation Research D, Energy Policy, Transportation Quarterly, and the Journal of Transportation and Statistics. Active in the Transportation Research Board (TRB) and the NRC, Dr. Greene has served on several standing and ad hoc committees. He is past chairman and member emeritus of TRB’s Energy Committee, was past chair of the Section on Environmental and Energy Concerns, and was a recipient of TRB’s Pyke Johnson Award. Dr. Greene received a B.A. degree from Columbia University in 1971, an M.A. from the University of Oregon in 1973, and a Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1978.


Linos Jacovides (NAE) recently retired as director, Delphi Research Labs, a position he held from 1998 to 2007. Dr. Jacovides joined General Motors Research and Development in 1967 and became department head of electrical engineering in 1985. He is a fellow of the IEEE. His areas of research were the interactions between power electronics and electrical machines in electric vehicles and locomotives. He later transitioned to Delphi with a group of researchers from GM to set up the Delphi Research Laboratories. He received a B.S. in electrical engineering and a master’s in machine theory from the University of Glasgow, Scotland. He received a Ph.D. in generator control systems from the Imperial College, University of London, in 1965.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

John H. Johnson is a presidential professor emeritus in the Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics at Michigan Technological University (MTU) and a fellow of the SAE and the ASME. His experience spans a wide range of analysis and experimental work on advanced engine concepts, diesel and other internal engine emissions studies, fuel systems, and engine simulation. He was previously project engineer at the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Center, and chief engineer in applied engine research at the International Harvester Company before joining the MTU mechanical engineering faculty. He served as chairman of the MTU mechanical engineering and engineering mechanics department from 1986 to 1993. He has served on many committees related to engine technology, engine emissions, and health effects—for example, committees of the SAE, the NRC, the Combustion Institute, the Health Effects Institute, and the Environmental Protection Agency—and consults to a number of government and private sector institutions. In particular, he served on many NRC committees, including the Committee on Fuel Economy of Automobiles and Light Trucks, the Committee on Advanced Automotive Technologies Plan, the Committee on the Impact and Effectiveness of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards, and the Committee to Assess Fuel Economy for Medium and HeavyDuty Vehicles. He chaired the NRC Committee on Review of DOE’s Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies and the NRC Committee on Review of the 21st Century Truck partnership. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin.


John G. Kassakian (NAE) is professor of electrical engineering and director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT’s) Laboratory for Electromagnetic and Electronic Systems. His expertise is in the use of electronics for the control and conversion of electrical energy, industrial and utility applications of power electronics, electronic manufacturing technologies, and automotive electrical and electronic systems. Before joining the MIT faculty, he served in the U.S. Navy. Dr. Kassakian is on the boards of directors of a number of companies and has held numerous positions with the IEEE, including founding president of the IEEE Power Electronics Society. He is a member of the NAE, a fellow of the IEEE, and a recipient of the IEEE’s William E. Newell Award for Outstanding Achievements in Power Electronics (1987), the IEEE Centennial Medal (1984), and the IEEE Power Electronics Society’s Distinguished Service Award (1998). He has served on a number of NRC committees, including the Committee on Review of the Research Program of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles and the Review of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Research Program. He has an Sc.D. in electrical engineering from MIT.


Roger B. Krieger is currently an adjunct professor at the engine research center of the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Before that, he was laboratory group manager, Compression Ignition Engine Systems Group at the Powertrain Systems Research Laboratory. He also held a position at the Institut Francais du Petrôle, Applications Division, Rueil-Malmaison, in France. Dr. Krieger has approximately 35 years of research and development experience in internal combustion engines, especially diesel engines and combustion. He holds approximately 10 patents related to engine and emissions control technologies. He served as vice-chair and chair of the Diesel Engine Committee, SAE. He has a B.S. and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Gary W. Rogers is president, chief executive officer, and sole director, FEV, Inc. His previous positions included director, Power Plant Engineering Services Division, and senior analytical engineer, Failure Analysis Associates, Inc.; design development engineer, Garrett Turbine Engine Company; and Exploration Geophysicist, Shell Oil Company. He has extensive experience in research, design, and development of advanced engine and powertrain systems, including homogeneous and direct-injected gasoline engines, high-speed direction injection passenger car diesel engines, heavy-duty diesel engines, hybrid vehicle systems, gas turbines, pumps, and compressors. He provides corporate leadership for a multinational research, design, and development organization specializing in engines and energy systems. He is a member of the SAE, is an advisor to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency on heavyfuel engines, and sits on the advisory board to the College of Engineering and Computer Science, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan. He served as a member of the NRC Committee on Review of DOE’s Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies Program, the NRC Committee on the Effectiveness and Impact of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards, and the NRC Panel on Benefits of DOE’s Light-Duty Hybrid Vehicle R&D Program. He also recently supported the Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration by conducting a peer review of the NHTSA CAFE Model. He has a B.S.M.E. from Northern Arizona University.


Robert F. Sawyer (NAE) is the Class of 1935 Professor of Energy Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a member of the NAE and recently served as chair of the California Air Resources Board. His previous positions include research engineer and chief, Liquid Systems Analysis, U.S. Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory; member of the research staff, Princeton University; member, California Air Resources Board; and chair, Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley. He is a past president of the Combustion Institute. His research includes combustion chemistry, pollutant formation and control, engine emissions, toxic waste incineration, alternative fuels, and regulatory policy. Dr. Sawyer served on numerous National Research Council committees, including the Committee for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

the Evaluation of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program, the Committee to Review EPA’s Mobile Source Emissions Factor (MOBILE) Model, and the Committee on Adiabatic Diesel Technology, among others. He holds a B.S. and an M.S. (mechanical engineering) from Stanford University and an M.A. (aeronautical engineering) and a Ph.D. (aerospace science) from Princeton University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×
Page 159
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×
Page 160
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×
Page 161
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×
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Various combinations of commercially available technologies could greatly reduce fuel consumption in passenger cars, sport-utility vehicles, minivans, and other light-duty vehicles without compromising vehicle performance or safety. Assessment of Technologies for Improving Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy estimates the potential fuel savings and costs to consumers of available technology combinations for three types of engines: spark-ignition gasoline, compression-ignition diesel, and hybrid.

According to its estimates, adopting the full combination of improved technologies in medium and large cars and pickup trucks with spark-ignition engines could reduce fuel consumption by 29 percent at an additional cost of $2,200 to the consumer. Replacing spark-ignition engines with diesel engines and components would yield fuel savings of about 37 percent at an added cost of approximately $5,900 per vehicle, and replacing spark-ignition engines with hybrid engines and components would reduce fuel consumption by 43 percent at an increase of $6,000 per vehicle.

The book focuses on fuel consumption--the amount of fuel consumed in a given driving distance--because energy savings are directly related to the amount of fuel used. In contrast, fuel economy measures how far a vehicle will travel with a gallon of fuel. Because fuel consumption data indicate money saved on fuel purchases and reductions in carbon dioxide emissions, the book finds that vehicle stickers should provide consumers with fuel consumption data in addition to fuel economy information.

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