National Academies Press: OpenBook

Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles (2011)

Chapter: Appendix C: List of Presentations at Public Committee Meetings

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Presentations at Public Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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C
List of Presentations at Public Committee Meetings

WASHINGTON, D.C., SEPTEMBER 10-11, 2007


Julie Abraham, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Fuel Economy Technology Study

William Charmley, EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality representative, Greenhouse Gases and Light-Duty Vehicles

Coralie Cooper, Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management, Technical Feasibility and Costs Associated with Reducing Passenger Car GHG Emissions

John German, USA Honda, Advanced Technologies, Diesels, and Hybrids

Dan Hancock, GM Powertrain, Assessing Powertrain Fuel Economy

John Heywood, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Challenges in Estimating Future Vehicle Fuel Consumption

Aymeric Rousseau, Argonne National Laboratory, Designing Advanced Vehicle Powertrains Using PSAT

Wolfgang Stütz, BMW of North America, Fuel Economy of BMW Diesel Vehicles


WASHINGTON, D.C., SEPTEMBER 27, 2007


K.G. Duleep, Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Approaches to Modeling Vehicle Fuel Economy

Kevin Green, The Volpe Center, CAFE Compliance and Effects Modeling System

Marc Wiseman, Ricardo, Inc., Potential Approaches to Modeling Fuel Economy Technologies: Engine Simulation Modeling Capabilities and Cost Analysis Capabilities


WASHINGTON, D.C., OCTOBER 25-26, 2007


Manahem Anderman, Advanced Automotive Batteries, Lithium-Ion Batteries for Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Opportunities and Challenges

Mark Daroux, Stratum Technologies, Inc., Lithium Ion Phosphate Batteries for Traction Application

Tien Duong, U.S. Department of Energy, Status of Electrical Energy Storage Technologies

Michel Forissier, Valeo, Fuel Economy Solutions

Bart Riley, A123 Systems, A123 Systems Battery Technologies


WASHINGTON, D.C., NOVEMBER 27-28, 2007


Khalil Amine, Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced High Power Chemistries for HEV Applications

Paul Blumberg, Ethanol Boosting Systems, LLC, Ethanol Turbo Boost for Gasoline Engines: Diesel and Hybrid Equivalent Efficiency at an Affordable Cost

Frank Fodal, Chrysler LLC, Fuel Economy/Fuels

David Geanacopoulos, Volkswagen of America, Inc., Diesel Technology for VW

Johannes Ruger, Bosch, Increasing Fuel Economy: Contribution of Bosch to Reach Future Goals

Robert Wimmer and Shunsuke Fushiki, Toyota, Toyota Hybrid Program


WASHINGTON, D.C., JANUARY 24-25, 2008


Steve Albu, California Air Resources Board, ARB Perspective on Vehicle Technology Costs for Reducing Greenhouse Gases

Wynn Bussman, Consultant, Study of Industry-Average Mark-up Factors Used to Estimate Retail Price Equivalents (RPE)

K.G. Duleep, Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Analysis of Technology Cost and Retail Price

Kevin McMahon, Martec Group, Variable Costs of Fuel Economy Technologies

James Lyons, Sierra Research, Inc., Technology and Retail Price Implications of More Stringent CAFE Standards Based on Vehicle Simulation Modeling

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Presentations at Public Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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WASHINGTON, D.C., FEBRUARY 25-26, 2008


Julie Abraham, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Update from NHTSA on Regulatory Activities and Other Analysis


WASHINGTON, D.C., MARCH 31-APRIL 1, 2008


David Haugen and Matt Brustar, EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality, Discussion of EPA’s Modeling of Fuel Economy

K.G. Duleep, Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Assessment of Costs and Fuel Economy Benefits


WASHINGTON, D.C., JUNE 3-4, 2008


Michael Bull, Aluminum Association, Opportunities for Reducing Vehicle Mass

Bruce Moor, Delphi Electronics and Safety, Power Electronics Systems Solutions for HEV Architectures

Huang-Yee Iu, Hymotion, Hymotion Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle


WASHINGTON, D.C., SEPTEMBER 9-10, 2008


Susan Yester, Chrysler, Opportunities for Reducing Vehicle Mass

Joseph Kubish, Manufacturers of Emissions, Control Equipment Association, Aftertreatment Technologies and Strategies for Light Duty Vehicles with Emphasis on NOxand Particulates

Frank Fronczak, University of Wisconsin, Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicle

John Kargul, EPA Clean Automotive Technology Program, EPA’s Hydraulic Hybrid Program


WASHINGTON, D.C., MARCH 16-18, 2009


EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality, Update from EPA on Analysis of RPE and Separate Ongoing Work on Estimates of Analysis of Direct Manufacturing Costs of Technologies

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Presentations at Public Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×
Page 165
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Presentations at Public Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Various combinations of commercially available technologies could greatly reduce fuel consumption in passenger cars, sport-utility vehicles, minivans, and other light-duty vehicles without compromising vehicle performance or safety. Assessment of Technologies for Improving Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy estimates the potential fuel savings and costs to consumers of available technology combinations for three types of engines: spark-ignition gasoline, compression-ignition diesel, and hybrid.

According to its estimates, adopting the full combination of improved technologies in medium and large cars and pickup trucks with spark-ignition engines could reduce fuel consumption by 29 percent at an additional cost of $2,200 to the consumer. Replacing spark-ignition engines with diesel engines and components would yield fuel savings of about 37 percent at an added cost of approximately $5,900 per vehicle, and replacing spark-ignition engines with hybrid engines and components would reduce fuel consumption by 43 percent at an increase of $6,000 per vehicle.

The book focuses on fuel consumption--the amount of fuel consumed in a given driving distance--because energy savings are directly related to the amount of fuel used. In contrast, fuel economy measures how far a vehicle will travel with a gallon of fuel. Because fuel consumption data indicate money saved on fuel purchases and reductions in carbon dioxide emissions, the book finds that vehicle stickers should provide consumers with fuel consumption data in addition to fuel economy information.

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