National Academies Press: OpenBook

Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles (2011)

Chapter: Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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I
Results of Other Major Studies

Tables I.1 through I.8, which indicate the costs and fuel consumption benefits from other major studies, are included here to facilitate the comparison to other sources of technology cost and effectiveness. However, the reader is encouraged to look at the original source material to gain a better understanding of the different assumptions made in each study. For example, some sources consider incremental benefits, while others do not. Certain items, such as improved accessories, may include different technologies, which makes an apples-to-apples comparison difficult. Retail price equivalent factors also vary from source to source, reinforcing the need to review the original materials as well as the tables.

REFERENCES

DOT/NHTSA (U.S. Department of Transportation/National Highway Traffic Safety Administration). 2009. Average Fuel Economy Standards, Passenger Cars and Light Trucks, Model Year 2001: Final Rule. 49 CFR Parts 523, 531, 533, 534, 536, and 537, Docket No. NHTSA-2009-0062, RIN 2127-AK29, March 23. Washington D.C.

EEA (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc.). 2007. Technologies to Improve Light-Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy. Draft report to the National Research Council Committee on Fuel Economy of Light-Duty Vehicles. EEA, Arlington, Va. September.

EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency). 2008. EPA Staff Technical Report: Cost and Effectiveness Estimates of Technologies Used to Reduce Light-Duty Vehicle Carbon Dioxide Emissions. EPA420R-08-008. EPA, Washington, D.C.

Martec Group, Inc. 2008. Variable Costs of Fuel Economy Technologies. Prepared for Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers. June 1; amended September 26 and December 10.

NESCCAF (Northeast States Center for a Clean Air Future). 2004. Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light-Duty Motor Vehicles. March.

NRC (National Research Council). 2002. Effectiveness and Impact of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

Ricardo, Inc. 2008. A Study of Potential Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Reducing Vehicle Technologies. Prepared for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, EPA420-R-08-004, Contract No. EP-C-06-003, Work Assignment No. 1-14, Ricardo, Inc., Ann Arbor, Mich.

Sierra Research. 2008. Basic Analysis of the Cost and Long-Term Impact of the Energy Independence and Security Act Fuel Economy Standards. Sierra Research, Sacramento, Calif. April 24.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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TABLE I.1 Technology Effectiveness, Incremental (Percent) Fuel Consumption Benefit from DOT/NHTSA (2009)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

TABLE I.2 Technology Effectiveness, Incremental (Percent) Fuel Consumption Benefit from NRC (2002)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

TABLE I.3 Technology Effectiveness, Incremental (Percent) Fuel Consumption Benefit from EPA (2008)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

TABLE I.4 Technology Effectiveness, Incremental (percent) Fuel Consumption Benefit from Ricardo, Inc. (2008), NESCCAF (2004), Sierra Research (2008), and EEA (2007)

continued
Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

TABLE I.5 Incremental Costs ($) from DOT/NHTSA (2009)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

TABLE I.6 Incremental Costs ($) from NRC (2002)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

TABLE I.7 Incremental Costs ($) from EPA (2008)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

TABLE I.8 Technology Effectiveness, Incremental (Percent) Fuel Consumption Benefit from EEA (2007), Sierra Research (2008), Martec (2008), and NESCCAF (2004)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
×

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I: Results of Other Major Studies." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12924.
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Next: Appendix J: Probabilities in Estimation of Fuel Consumption Benefits and Costs »
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Various combinations of commercially available technologies could greatly reduce fuel consumption in passenger cars, sport-utility vehicles, minivans, and other light-duty vehicles without compromising vehicle performance or safety. Assessment of Technologies for Improving Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy estimates the potential fuel savings and costs to consumers of available technology combinations for three types of engines: spark-ignition gasoline, compression-ignition diesel, and hybrid.

According to its estimates, adopting the full combination of improved technologies in medium and large cars and pickup trucks with spark-ignition engines could reduce fuel consumption by 29 percent at an additional cost of $2,200 to the consumer. Replacing spark-ignition engines with diesel engines and components would yield fuel savings of about 37 percent at an added cost of approximately $5,900 per vehicle, and replacing spark-ignition engines with hybrid engines and components would reduce fuel consumption by 43 percent at an increase of $6,000 per vehicle.

The book focuses on fuel consumption--the amount of fuel consumed in a given driving distance--because energy savings are directly related to the amount of fuel used. In contrast, fuel economy measures how far a vehicle will travel with a gallon of fuel. Because fuel consumption data indicate money saved on fuel purchases and reductions in carbon dioxide emissions, the book finds that vehicle stickers should provide consumers with fuel consumption data in addition to fuel economy information.

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