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Technology for a Quieter America (2010)

Chapter: Appendix C: Additional Information on Standards Activities

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Additional Information on Standards Activities." National Academy of Engineering. 2010. Technology for a Quieter America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12928.
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Appendix C
Additional Information on Standards Activities

Accredited Standards Committees

The Acoustical Society of America (ASA) administers four accredited standards committees under contract with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). See http://www.acosoc.org/standards. The four committees deal with noise and its effects:

  • Accredited Standards Committee S12 Noise,

  • Accredited Standards Committee S1 Acoustics,

  • Accredited Standards Committee S2 Mechanical Vibration and Shock, and

  • Accredited Standards Committee S3 Bioacoustics.

These committees are referred to as accredited standards committees (ASCS) because they are accredited by ANSI and function according to operating procedures approved by ANSI. To maintain their accredited status, the operation of the committees is subject to periodic audits by ANSI. These committees are composed of organizational members who vote on proposed consensus standards; criteria and dues for membership are established by each committee, and balance of interested parties is required. As of November 2008, S12 had 48 organizational members, S1 had 17 organizational members, S2 had 38 organizational members, and S3 had 27 organizational members. Each ASA ASC also has individual experts who assist each committee by providing technical expertise.

ASC S12 Scope: Standards, specifications, and terminology in the field of acoustical noise pertaining to methods of measurement, evaluation, and control, including biological safety, tolerance and comfort, and physical acoustics as related to environmental and occupational noise.


ASC S1 Scope: Standards, specifications, methods of measurement and test, and terminology in the field of physical acoustics, including architectural acoustics, electroacoustics, sonics and ultrasonics, and underwater sound, but excluding those aspects which pertain to biological safety, tolerance, and comfort.


ASC S2 Scope: Standards, specification, methods of measurement and test, and terminology in the field of mechanical vibration and shock, and condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines, including the effects of exposure to mechanical vibration and shock on humans, including those aspects which pertain to biological safety and tolerance and comfort.


ASC S3 Scope: Standards, specifications, methods of measurement and test, and terminology in the fields of psychological and physiological acoustics, including aspects of general acoustics, which pertain to biological safety and tolerance and comfort.

ASA pays a substantial annual fee to ANSI to be allowed to administer these committees. The ASA does this as a public service in furtherance of its mission to “increase and diffuse the knowledge of acoustics and promote its practical application.”

Other organizations have ANSI-approved accredited standards committees that deal with noise; some of their standards are listed below. Many of these standards rely on basic acoustic or noise standards developed by ASA ASC S1, S12, S2, and S3.

Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM)

Air Movement and Control Association International, Inc. (AMCA)

Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI)

Alliance for Telecommunication Industry Solutions (ATIS)

American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Additional Information on Standards Activities." National Academy of Engineering. 2010. Technology for a Quieter America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12928.
×

American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)

Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

Underwriters Laboratory (UL)

Other organizations promulgate standards or recommended practices that are not accredited by ANSI and are not American National Standards. Such organizations include the Institute of Noise Control Engineering, the Audio Engineering Society (AES), and others, including trade associations.

Role of U.S. Technical Advisory Groups

The ASA also administers nine U.S. Technical Advisory Groups (U.S. TAGs). These U.S TAGs review international documents—primarily draft standards—and develop the U.S. position on them. They also provide the pool of candidates for appointment to international working groups and volunteers to coordinate and prepare draft U.S. positions (http://www.acosoc.org/standards/). The TAGs are also ANSI-accredited. The nine TAGs are:

  • U.S. TAG for ISO/TC 43, Acoustics

  • U.S. TAG for ISO/TC 43/SC 1, Noise

  • U.S. TAG for ISO/TC 108, Mechanical vibration, shock, and condition monitoring

  • U.S. TAG for ISO/TC 108/SC 2, Measurement and evaluation of mechanical vibration and shock as applied to machines, vehicles, and structures

  • U.S. TAG for ISO/TC 108/SC 3, Use and calibration of vibration and shock measuring instruments

  • U.S. TAG for ISO/TC 108/SC 4, Human exposure to mechanical vibration and shock

  • U.S. TAG for ISO/TC 108/SC 5, Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines

  • U.S. TAG for ISO/TC 108/SC 6, Vibration- and shock-generating systems

  • U.S. TAG for IEC/TC 29, Electroacoustics

As with the S committees, ASA pays a substantial annual fee to ANSI to be allowed to administer the U.S. TAGs in these subject areas. The TAGs are also accredited by ANSI and must follow their accredited operating procedures.

ISO Technical Committees with an Interest in Noise or Sound

The following committees of the International Organization for Standardization (http://www.iso.org) have an interest in noise or sound:

TC 4

Roller bearings

TC 21/SC 3

Equipment for fire protection and fire fighting/fire detection and alarm systems

TC 22/SC 22

Motorcycles

TC 23/SC 2

Tractors and machinery for agricultural forestry/common tests

TC 23/SC 3

Tractors and machinery for agricultural forestry/safety and comfort

TC 23/SC 17

Tractors and machinery for agricultural forestry/manually portable forest machinery

TC 36

Cinematography

TC 39/SC 6

Machine tools/noise of machine tools

TC 43/SC 1

Acoustics/noise

TC 43/SC 2

Acoustics/building acoustics

TC 60

Gears

TC 70

Internal combustion engines

TC 72/SC 8

Textile machinery and accessories/safety requirements for textile machinery

TC 86

Refrigeration and air conditioning

TC 86/SC 3

Testing and rating of factory-made refrigeration systems (excluding systems covered by Subcommittees 5, 6, and 7)

TC 86/SC 5

Refrigeration and air conditioning/testing and rating of household refrigeration appliances

TC 86/SC 6

Factory-made air-cooled air-conditioning and air-to-air heat pump units

TC 108/SC 2

Measurement and evaluation of mechanical vibration and shock as applied to machines, vehicles, and structures

TC 115

Pumps

TC 117

Industrial fans

TC 118/SC 3

Compressors and pneumatic tools, machines, and equipment/pneumatic tools and machines

TC 118/SC 6

Compressors and pneumatic tools, machines, and equipment/air compressors and compressed air systems

TC 127/SC 2

Earth-moving machinery/safety, ergonomics, and general requirements

TC 131/SC 8

Fluid power systems/product testing

TC 160/SC 2

Glass in buildings/use considerations

TC 188

Small craft

ISO TCs that Develop Standards Related to Noise

TC 2

Rotating machinery

TC 5

Steam turbines (in standby)

TC 59

Performance of household and similar appliances

TC 65

Industrial process measurement, control, and automation

TC 88

Wind turbines

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Additional Information on Standards Activities." National Academy of Engineering. 2010. Technology for a Quieter America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12928.
×

IEC-Developed Standards Related to Noise

Examples of standards related to noise developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (http://www.iec.ch) are:

IEC 60034-9, 60034-9am1, Noise limits—rotating electrical machines (developed by TC 2)


IEC 61063 Acoustics—Measurement of airborne noise emitted by steam turbines and driven machinery (Based on ISO 3766, but under good conditions ISO 3744 may be used; developed by TC 5)


IEC 60704 Household and similar electrical appliances—Test code for the determination of airborne acoustical noise (based on ISO 3743-1, 3743-2, and ISO 3744; developed by IEC TC 59, Performance of household and similar appliances, as well as various subcommittees)


Parts of Standard

-1

General requirements

-2-1

Vacuum cleaners

-2-2

Forced draught convection heaters

-2-3

Dishwashers

-2-3am1

Dishwashers

-2-4

Washing machines and spin extractors

-2-5

Thermal storage room heaters

-2-6

Tumble dryers

-2-7

Fans

-2-8

Electric shavers

-2-9

Electric care appliances

-2-10

Ovens, grills, etc.

-2-11

Electrically operated food preparation devices

-2-13

Range hoods

-2-2-13am1

Range hoods

-3

Procedures for determining and verifying declared noise emission values

IEC 60534-8-1/-8-2/-8-3, Industrial processes—control valves. Measurement of noise by control valve noise–aerodynamic/hydrodynamic/flow through (developed by TC 65 and various subcommittees)


IEC 61400-11 Wind turbine generator systems, Part 11. Acoustic noise measurement techniques (developed by TC 88: Wind Turbines)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Additional Information on Standards Activities." National Academy of Engineering. 2010. Technology for a Quieter America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12928.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Additional Information on Standards Activities." National Academy of Engineering. 2010. Technology for a Quieter America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12928.
×
Page 149
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Additional Information on Standards Activities." National Academy of Engineering. 2010. Technology for a Quieter America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12928.
×
Page 150
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Additional Information on Standards Activities." National Academy of Engineering. 2010. Technology for a Quieter America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12928.
×
Page 151
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Additional Information on Standards Activities." National Academy of Engineering. 2010. Technology for a Quieter America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12928.
×
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Exposure to noise at home, at work, while traveling, and during leisure activities is a fact of life for all Americans. At times noise can be loud enough to damage hearing, and at lower levels it can disrupt normal living, affect sleep patterns, affect our ability to concentrate at work, interfere with outdoor recreational activities, and, in some cases, interfere with communications and even cause accidents. Clearly, exposure to excessive noise can affect our quality of life.

As the population of the United States and, indeed, the world increases and developing countries become more industrialized, problems of noise are likely to become more pervasive and lower the quality of life for everyone. Efforts to manage noise exposures, to design quieter buildings, products, equipment, and transportation vehicles, and to provide a regulatory environment that facilitates adequate, cost-effective, sustainable noise controls require our immediate attention.

Technology for a Quieter America looks at the most commonly identified sources of noise, how they are characterized, and efforts that have been made to reduce noise emissions and experiences. The book also reviews the standards and regulations that govern noise levels and the federal, state, and local agencies that regulate noise for the benefit, safety, and wellness of society at large. In addition, it presents the cost-benefit trade-offs between efforts to mitigate noise and the improvements they achieve, information sources available to the public on the dimensions of noise problems and their mitigation, and the need to educate professionals who can deal with these issues.

Noise emissions are an issue in industry, in communities, in buildings, and during leisure activities. As such, Technology for a Quieter America will appeal to a wide range of stakeholders: the engineering community; the public; government at the federal, state, and local levels; private industry; labor unions; and nonprofit organizations. Implementation of the recommendations in Technology for a Quieter America will result in reduction of the noise levels to which Americans are exposed and will improve the ability of American industry to compete in world markets paying increasing attention to the noise emissions of products.

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