National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix A: References
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×

B
Workshop Agendas1

Raleigh Workshop

April 15, 2010

Renaissance Raleigh North Hills Hotel

Raleigh, North Carolina


Austin Workshop

April 27, 2010

AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center

Austin, Texas


Seattle Workshop

May 11, 2010

The Alexis Hotel Seattle

Seattle, Washington


Workshop Objectives

Following the recent, and ongoing, H1N1 vaccination campaigns, the objectives of this workshop are to

  • Examine innovative efforts used to distribute and administer vaccine and discuss how they may inform future efforts.

  • Examine how jurisdictions and providers interpreted and applied the CDC/ACIP recommendations for use of H1N1 vaccine.

1

To save space, the individual agendas from each regional meeting have been compiled into a single document. Under each session, speakers have been identified based on the meeting location where they participated: Raleigh, Austin, and/or Seattle.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
  • Highlight successful approaches used by jurisdictions to develop and use innovative partnerships with traditional and non-traditional partners, such as community groups and the private sector, to enhance communication with the public and providers and to effectively distribute and administer vaccine.

  • Discuss strategies used to collect, monitor, evaluate, and use data during the H1N1 vaccination campaigns.

  • Discuss lessons learned and challenges that arose during the vaccination campaigns, and identify strategies to address these challenges for future emergency vaccination programs and other medical countermeasures dispensing campaigns.

Welcoming Remarks


Raleigh

JEFFREY ENGEL, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services

Austin

DAVID LAKEY, Texas Department of State Health Services

Seattle

MARY SELECKY, Washington State Department of Health

Charge to Workshop Speakers and Participants


Raleigh, Seattle

JAY BUTLER, Workshop Co-Chair, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Austin, Seattle

JEFFREY DUCHIN, Workshop Co-Chair, Public Health–Seattle & King County, WA

SESSION I:
DISTRIBUTION STRATEGIES

Session Objectives

  • Provide an overview of strategies developed to receive, store, and distribute vaccine to participating H1N1 vaccine providers and administration sites in the community and strategies developed to administer vaccine:

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
  • How were providers and vaccinators recruited to participate in the H1N1 vaccination program? What partnerships were used? Did these partnerships rely on preexisting relationships and, if so, were they successful? Were new partnerships built?

  • What lessons were learned from the use of a centralized distribution mechanism?

  • Was vaccine distributed to administration sites through centralized healthcare system distribution sites or directly to administration sites?

  • How did the availability of specific vaccine formulations and indications impact distribution and administration strategies?

  • Discuss the successes, lessons learned, and how challenges might be addressed to help improve future emergency vaccination programs and other medical countermeasure campaigns.

Overview and Panel Objectives


Raleigh, Seattle

JAY BUTLER, Panel Chair, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Austin

JEFFREY DUCHIN, Panel Chair, Public Health–Seattle & King County, WA

Panel Remarks


Raleigh

SUSAN COOPER, Tennessee Department of Health

ANNE BAILOWITZ, Baltimore City Health Department, MD

JAMES TURNER, American College Health Association

AMANDA FULLER, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services

GREG PRIMUTH, Walgreens

KIM BOGGESS, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×

Austin

DON WILLIAMSON, Alabama Department of Public Health

JOHN REDD, Indian Health Service

ANN SALYER-CALDWELL, Tarrant County Public Health, TX

JAY BUECHE, H-E-B

JEANNE SHEFFIELD, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

WAYNE HACHEY, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs)

Seattle

MARK HORTON, California Department of Public Health

DAVID FLEMING, Public Health–Seattle & King County, WA

JENNIFER ARNOLD, Washington State Pharmacy Association

NEIL KANESHIRO, Woodinville Pediatrics, WA, and the Washington State Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics

J. MICHAEL MUHM, The Boeing Company

LEONARDO PEREIRA, Oregon Health and Science University

Discussion with Panelists and Attendees

SESSION II:
PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION AND VACCINE ADMINISTRATION

Session Objectives

  • Examine how jurisdictions and providers interpreted and applied the CDC/ACIP guidance:

    • Was vaccine administered sequentially or simultaneously to groups within the target population?

    • Was vaccine restricted to subgroups within the target population?

    • Was vaccine administered to groups outside the target population? If so, how and why was that decision made?

    • How was demand among target populations assessed?

    • What criteria were used for expanding beyond initial target populations?

    • What challenges arose in the interpretation, implementation, and regional coordination of CDC/ACIP recommendations

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
  • for H1N1 vaccination? Would a more restrictive, uniform approach have been desirable, or was the flexibility of the CDC/ACIP guidance important?

  • How did local interpretation of CDC/ACIP guidance influence strategy for vaccine administration?

  • Discuss lessons learned and how challenges might be addressed to help improve future emergency vaccination programs and other medical countermeasure campaigns.

Overview and Psanel Objectives


Raleigh, Austin

DAVID LAKEY, Panel Chair, Texas Department of State Health Services

Seattle

JEFFREY DUCHIN, Panel Chair, Public Health–Seattle & King County, WA

Panel Remarks


Raleigh

LAUREN SMITH, Massachusetts Department of Public Health

RAHUL GUPTA, Kanawha–Charleston Health Department, WV

BEVERLY PRITCHETT, Washington, DC, Department of Health

SCOTT NEEDLE, Collier Health Services, Inc., FL, and the American Academy of Pediatrics

CAROL CUNNINGHAM, Ohio Department of Public Safety

JOHN CARSON ROUNDS, Village Family Care, NC, and the American Academy of Family Physicians

Austin

JULIE MORITA, Chicago Department of Public Health, IL

PERRY BYNUM, Haltom City Fire/Rescue, TX

STEPHEN BLAIR, American Academy of Family Physicians

JASON TERK, Cook Children’s Physician Network, TX, and the Texas Pediatrics Society

TOM SHIMABUKURO, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Seattle

TERESA GARRETT, Utah Department of Health

KRISTEN EHRESMANN, Minnesota Department of Health

JOE FINKBONNER, Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×

ALONZO PLOUGH, County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health, CA

DAVID GROSSMAN, Group Health Cooperative, WA

Discussion with Panelists and Attendees

SESSION III:
COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES

Session Objectives

  • Provide an overview of strategies used by communities to inform the general public, vulnerable populations, select target populations, and priority workforce (e.g., healthcare providers and first responders) about the threat of the pandemic and the availability of and eligibility for vaccine:

    • What strategies were successful and unsuccessful in developing and delivering communication messages for specific segments of the population?

    • What particular challenges were associated with different population groups?

    • Given the challenges of vaccine availability, what strategies were used to manage expectations of providers, target populations, and the public?

    • How were target populations informed about vaccine availability?

    • How were target populations assured about vaccine safety?

  • Discuss lessons learned and how challenges might be addressed to help improve future emergency vaccination programs and other medical countermeasure campaigns.

Overview and Panel Objectives

Raleigh, Seattle

JACK HERRMANN, Panel Chair, National Association of County and City Health Officials

Austin

KRISTINE SHEEDY, Panel Chair, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×

Panel Remarks


Raleigh

KARYL RATTAY, Delaware Department of Health and Social Services

PAMELA BLACKWELL, Cobb & Douglas Public Health, GA

DAVID BROWN, The Washington Post

BENJAMIN RACKLEY, Tuskegee Area Health Education Center, Inc., AL

JULIE HENRY, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services

Austin

PAUL HALVERSON, Arkansas Department of Health

LESLEA BENNETT-WEBB, Oklahoma State Department of Health

CANDACE CRAUSE, Champaign-Urbana Public Health District, IL

GREG BOGDAN, Rocky Mountain Poison & Drug Center at Denver Health, CO

MAGGIE FOX, Reuters

Seattle

SELENA MANYCHILDREN, Navajo Division of Health

MOHAMED SHEIKH HASSAN, Afrique Service Center, WA

TIFFANY SUTTER, California Department of Public Health

GREG WILKINSON, State of Alaska Health and Social Services

Discussion with Panelists and Attendees

SESSION IV:
MONITORING, IMPACT, AND EVALUATION

Session Objectives

  • Examine and discuss strategies that were used to collect, monitor, evaluate, and use data during the H1N1 vaccination campaign:

    • What data were used to ascertain the impact and reach of this immunization effort?

    • What data would have been especially helpful but were not available?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
  • How can data be gathered and analyzed quickly during an event in order to drive policy immediately?

  • Was it possible to assess vaccine coverage? What levels of coverage were achieved among different populations, and did the H1N1 vaccination campaign adequately immunize persons in the ACIP target groups?

  • What data were used or would be most useful to improve immunization rates for persons in the target groups and in the general population?

  • Discuss lessons learned and how monitoring, impact, and evaluation can be improved for future emergency vaccination programs and other medical countermeasure campaigns.

Overview and Panel Objectives


Raleigh

CATHY SLEMP, Panel Chair, West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources

Austin

B. TILMAN JOLLY, Panel Chair, Department of Homeland Security

Seattle

BETH BELL, Panel Chair, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Panel Remarks


Raleigh

KAREN REMLEY, Virginia Department of Health

DAVID GRUBER, New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services

BETH MALDIN MORGENTHAU, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, NY

LAURA WILLIAMS, Boston EMS, MA

PASCALE WORTLEY, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

BETH ROWE-WEST, Association of Immunization Managers

Austin

DANIEL HOPFENSPERGER, Wisconsin Department of Health Services

EDUARDO SANCHEZ, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas

ANGIEHAGY, City of Milwaukee Health Department, WI

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×

PAMELA FALK, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Seattle

CATHY SLEMP, West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources

ANTHONY L.-T. CHEN, Tacoma–Pierce County Health Department, WA

LAURENE MASCOLA, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, CA

RICHARD JUSTMAN, UnitedHealth Group

Discussion with Panelists and Attendees

SESSION V:
GENERAL DISCUSSION WITH WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND ATTENDEES

Session Objectives


Discuss opportunities and constraints identified during the workshop that may help inform future efforts to administer vaccine and dispense medical countermeasures. As future campaigns are developed and time-dependent scenarios considered, what improvements are needed to ensure a safe, robust, and timely response?


Panel Discussion: Implementing the Lessons Learned


Raleigh

LISA KOONIN, Panel Chair, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CATHY SLEMP, West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources

PAMELA BLACKWELL, Cobb & Douglas Public Health, GA

SCOTT NEEDLE, Collier Health Services Inc., FL, and the American Academy of Pediatrics

Austin

JEFFREY DUCHIN, Panel Co-Chair, Public Health–Seattle & King County, WA

LISA KOONIN, Panel Co-Chair, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×

TOBY MERLIN, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

DAVID LAKEY, Texas Department of State Health Services

Seattle

TOBY MERLIN, Panel Chair, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

JAMES BLUMENSTOCK, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials

CATHY SLEMP, West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources

JACK HERRMANN, National Association of County and City Health Officials

Moderated Discussion with Panelists and Attendees

  • What new ideas have surfaced in this meeting today that should be explored further?

  • Were lessons learned during the pandemic response that could enhance efforts to reduce the burden of seasonal flu in future years?

  • Were any examples discussed that could be implemented immediately to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the vaccine administration system?

  • What further evaluation questions remain?

Closing Remarks


Raleigh

JAY BUTLER, Workshop Co-Chair, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Austin, Seattle

JEFFREY DUCHIN, Workshop Co-Chair, Public Health–Seattle & King County, WA

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
Page 103
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
Page 104
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
Page 106
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
Page 109
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
Page 110
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
Page 111
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2010. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12992.
×
Page 112
Next: Appendix C: Workshop Speakers and Registered Attendees »
The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Summary of a Workshop Series Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $43.00 Buy Ebook | $34.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign was one of the largest public health campaigns in U.S. history, vaccinating one-quarter of the population in the first three months. The Institute of Medicine held three workshops in Raleigh, NC; Austin, TX; and Seattle, WA to learn from participants' experiences during the campaign and improve future emergency vaccination programs.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!