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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. A Data-Based Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States (with CD). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12994.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. A Data-Based Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States (with CD). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12994.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. A Data-Based Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States (with CD). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12994.
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Page 113
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. A Data-Based Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States (with CD). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12994.
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Page 114
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. A Data-Based Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States (with CD). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12994.
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Page 115
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. A Data-Based Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States (with CD). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12994.
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Page 116
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. A Data-Based Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States (with CD). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12994.
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Page 117
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2011. A Data-Based Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States (with CD). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12994.
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Appendix A Committee Biographies JEREMIAH P. OSTRIKER, Ph.D. (NAS), Committee Chair, is a professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton University and Plumian Professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy, Emeritus, at the University of Cambridge. He received his B.A. in physics and chemistry from Harvard University and his Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Chicago. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Cambridge University, Dr. Ostriker served on the faculty at Princeton University as a professor (1966–present); as department chair, and as university provost. During his tenure as provost, Princeton received a major grant from the Mellon Foundation to improve doctoral education in the humanities. He is a renowned astrophysicist and has received many awards and honors, including membership in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the U.S. National Medal of Science in 2001. He has served on several National Research Council (NRC) and National Academies committees, including the NAS Council and the NRC Governing Board. Dr. Ostriker also served as the chair of the Panel on Quantitative Measures. Currently, he is treasurer of the National Academy of Sciences. VIRGINIA S. HINSHAW, Ph.D., Committee Vice Chair, is the chancellor of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and professor of virology in the John A. Burns School of Medicine at UH Mānoa. Dr. Hinshaw earned her B.S. in laboratory technology and her M.S. and Ph.D. in microbiology from Auburn University. For over 25 years, her research focused on influenza viruses in humans, lower mammals, and birds, investigating such aspects as: important hosts in nature; transmission among species; genetic changes related to disease severity; the molecular basis of cell killing; and new approaches to vaccines. She conducted research at various hospitals and universities, including the Medical College of Virginia, UC Berkeley, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Harvard Medical School and University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has been recognized for her innovative and energetic teaching style and her continual advocacy for research and education, particularly related to increased participation by women and minorities. She has served on numerous national and international committees associated with the American Society of Virology, Committee on Institutional Cooperation, World Health Organization, Association of American Universities (AAU) and Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU, formerly NASULGC) and she currently serves as Co-Chair for the Energy Advisory Committee for APLU and as a member of the American Council on Education (ACE) Commission for Effective Leadership. Prior to joining UH Mānoa, Dr. Hinshaw served as the provost and executive vice chancellor at the University of California Davis and as dean of the graduate school and vice chancellor for research at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. ELTON D. ABERLE, Ph.D., is dean emeritus and professor emeritus of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He received his B.S. from Kansas State University, his M.S. from Michigan State University, and his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in food sciences. Dr. Aberle has held 111

112 APPENDIX A administrative positions at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln's Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources and a faculty position at Purdue University. His research and teaching background is in muscle biology and the animal and food sciences. Dr. Aberle has received teaching and research awards from the American Society of Animal Sciences and the American Meat Science Association, and he is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Society of Animal Science. He also served on the Panel of Taxonomy and Interdisciplinarity. NORMAN M. BRADBURN, Ph.D., is Tiffany and Margaret Blake Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago and senior fellow at the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. He has served three terms as director of the center, from 1967 to 1992. From 2000 to 2004 he was assistant director for social, behavioral and economic sciences at the National Science Foundation (NSF). He also served as provost of the University of Chicago from 1984 to 1989. He received his Ph.D. degree in social psychology from Harvard University. He has been a member of the research and advisory panel of the U.S. General Accounting Office; a member and former chair of the Committee on National Statistics, NRC/NAS; and a member of the Panel to Review the Statistical Procedures for the Decennial Census. He also is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Statistical Association. His research has focused on psychological well-being and assessing the quality of life; nonsampling errors in sample surveys; and research on cognitive processes in responses to sample surveys. He is currently working on developing a humanities indicator system and a large scale study of the cultural infrastructure. His book, Thinking About Answers: The Application of Cognitive Process to Survey Methodology (co-authored with Seymour Sudman and Norbert Schwarz; Jossey-Bass, 1996), follows three other publications on the methodology of designing and constructing questionnaires: Polls and Surveys: Understanding What They Tell Us (with Seymour Sudman; Jossey-Bass, 1988); Asking Questions: A Practical Guide to Questionnaire Construction (with Seymour Sudman; Jossey-Bass, 1982; 2nd edition with Brian Wansink, 2004) and Improving Interviewing Method and Questionnaire Design (Jossey-Bass, 1979). JOHN I. BRAUMAN, Ph.D. (NAS), is J. G. Jackson–C. J. Wood Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, at Stanford University. Dr. Brauman received his S.B from MIT and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He was an NSF postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Los Angeles, and then he took the position at Stanford University, where he served as department chair, associate dean for natural sciences, and associate dean of research (since 2005). He also currently serves as the home secretary of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Brauman has received a number of awards, including the American Chemical Society Award in Pure Chemistry, Harrison Howe Award, Guggenheim Fellowship, R. C. Fuson Award, Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award, James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry, the National Academy of Sciences Award in Chemical Sciences, Linus Pauling Medal, Willard Gibbs Medal, and National Medal of Science. He also received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching from Stanford University. Dr. Brauman is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and American Philosophical Society, and a fellow of the AAAS and an honorary fellow of the

APPENDIX A 113 California Academy of Sciences. He has served as well on many national committees and advisory boards. He was deputy editor for physical sciences for SCIENCE from 1985 to 2000 and is currently chair of the Senior Editorial Board. Dr. Brauman's research has centered on structure and reactivity. JONATHAN R. COLE, Ph.D., is at Columbia University. He is currently the John Mitchell Mason Professor of the University, and was provost and dean of faculties at Columbia from 1989 to 2003. He received his B.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia. At Columbia he was the Adolphe Quetelet Professor of Social Science (1989–2001); professor of sociology (1976–present; vice president of arts and sciences, 1987–1989); and director, Center for the Social Sciences (1979–1987). His awards and memberships include the following: fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California, 1975–1976; John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship recipient, 1975–1976; elected fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1992; "National Associate," U.S. National Academies of Sciences, 2003; elected member, Council on Foreign Relations, 2003; elected member, American Philosophical Society, 2005; Cavaliere Ufficiale in the Order of Merit of the Republic of Italy, 1996; and Commendatore in the Order of Merit of the Republic of Italy, 2003. Some publications in the sociology of science, science policy, and higher education, include: Social Stratification in Science (with Stephen Cole) (1973); Peer Review in the National Science Foundation: Phase One (1978) and Phase Two (1981) of a Study (co-authored); Fair Science: Women in the Scientific Community (1979); The Wages of Writing: Per Word, Per Piece, or Perhaps (1986) (co-authored); The Outer Circle: Women in the Scientific Community (1991) (co-edited and author); The Research University in a Time of Discontent (co-edited and author)(1994); multiple journal publications on similar topics. His book, The Great American University: Its Rise to Preeminence, Its Threatened Future, published by Public Affairs in the fall of 2009.Resigned June 2010. PAUL W. HOLLAND, Ph.D., holds the Frederic M. Lord Chair in Measurement and Statistics (retired) in the Research & Development Division at the Educational Testing Service (ETS) in Princeton, New Jersey. He received a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Michigan and a M.A. and Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. His association with ETS began in 1975. In 1979 he became director of the Research Statistics Group. In 1986 Dr. Holland was appointed ETS's first distinguished research scientist. He left ETS in 1993 to join the faculty at University of California, Berkeley, as a professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Department of Statistics, but returned in 2000 to his current position at ETS. He has made significant contributions to the following applications of statistics to social science research, categorical data analysis, social networks, test equating, differential item functioning, test security issues, causal inference in nonexperimental research, and the foundations of item response theory. His current research interests include kernel equating methods, population invariance of test linking, software for item response theory, and causal inference in program evaluation and policy research. ERIC W. KALER, Ph.D. (NAE), became the provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Stony Brook University in 2007. Prior to that, he was the Elizabeth

114 APPENDIX A Inez Kelley Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and the dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Delaware. He holds a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, both in chemical engineering. He has served on several NRC panels, including the subpanel for the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Center for Neutron Research, which he chaired, and the Panel for Materials Science and Engineering. He was one of the first scientists to receive a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation in 1984. In 2001 he was named an AAAS fellow. Among other awards are the Curtis W. McGraw Research Award from the American Society of Engineering Education in 1995 and the 1998 American Chemical Society Award in Colloid or Surface Chemistry. Dr. Kaler was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2010 and is co-editor-in-chief of Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science. He is known for his distinguished study of the science and application of complex fluids. EARL LEWIS, Ph.D., is provost and executive vice president for academic affairs and the Asa Griggs Candler Professor of History and African American Studies at Emory University. Before joining the Emory faculty in July 2004, Dr. Lewis served as dean of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies and vice provost for academic affairs/graduate studies at the University of Michigan. At Michigan, he was the Elsa Barkley Brown and Robin D. G. Kelley Collegiate Professor of History and African American and African Studies and served as director of the Center for Afro-American and African Studies. From 1984 to 1989 he was on the faculty of the Department of African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Lewis, who holds degrees in history and psychology, is author and co-editor of seven books, among them In Their Own Interests: Race, Class and Power in 20th Century Norfolk (University of California Press, 1993) and the award-winning To Make Our World Anew: A History of African Americans (Oxford University Press, 2000). Between 1997 and 2000 he co- edited the eleven-volume The Young Oxford History of African Americans. Lewis co- authored the widely acclaimed Love on Trial: An American Scandal in Black and White, published in 2001 by WW Norton. His most recent books are The African American Urban Experience: Perspectives from the Colonial Period to the Present, co-edited and published with Palgrave (2004), and the co-written Defending Diversity: Affirmative Action at the University of Michigan, published by the University of Michigan Press (2004). He is co-editor of the award-winning book series American Crossroads (University of California Press). Dr. Lewis is a current or past member of a number of editorial boards and boards of directors. In 2001 he received the University of Minnesota's Outstanding Achievement Award, which is given to a distinguished graduate. Concordia College, whose board of regents he joined in 2008, awarded him an honorary degree in 2002. He was named a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2008. JOAN F. LORDEN, Ph.D., is provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She received a B.A. from the City College of New York and a Ph.D. from Yale University. For over eight years Dr. Lorden served as dean of the graduate school and associate provost for research at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). From 2002 to 2003, she was the dean-in-residence of

APPENDIX A 115 the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) at the Division of Graduate Education at the National Science Foundation, and she chaired the CGS board. She also has chaired the board of Oak Ridge Associated Universities and was president of the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools. Dr. Lorden has been a member of the Executive Committee of the Council on Academic Affairs, and she chaired the Executive Committee of the Council on Research Policy and Graduate Education of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges (NASULGC, now the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities). She was awarded the Ireland Prize for Scholarly Distinction by UAB. She has served on review panels and study sections at NSF, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense, and private agencies. At UAB she organized the doctoral program in behavioral neuroscience and was a founding member and director of the university-wide interdisciplinary Graduate Training Program in Neuroscience. As graduate dean, Dr. Lorden fostered programs that would increase the breadth of training among graduate students, served as the program director for an interdisciplinary biological sciences training grant, and established one of the first offices for postdoctoral support. She is actively involved in programs designed to improve the success of women and minorities in graduate education and faculty careers in science and engineering, and has received several grants to advance these goals. Dr. Lorden’s research focuses on brain-behavior relationships. CAROL B. LYNCH, Ph.D., is a senior scholar at the Council of Graduate Schools, where she directs the professional master's initiatives. She is also dean emerita at the University of Colorado at Boulder where she was dean of the graduate school and vice chancellor for research from 1992 to 2004. She was professor of ecological and evolutionary biology, and is a fellow of the Institute for Behavioral Genetics. She received her B.A. from Mount Holyoke College, her M.A. from the University of Michigan, and her Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. She held a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Institute for Behavioral Genetics at the University of Colorado. Much of her professional career was spent at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, where she served as a professor of biology and dean of the sciences. She has received a Research Career Development Award from the National Institutes of Health, is a fellow of the AAAS, and was president of the Behavior Genetics Association. Prior to coming to the University of Colorado, Dr. Lynch was the program director in population biology and physiological ecology at the NSF. She was president of the Western Association of Graduate Schools and has served on the board of directors of the Council of Graduate Schools and on the executive committee of the Council on Research Policy and Graduate Education at NASULGC (now APLU). She is currently a member of the Graduate Record Examination Board and was the chair of the TOEFL Board (Educational Testing Service, ETS). Dr. Lynch has authored numerous publications in evolutionary and behavioral genetics. ROBERT M. NEREM, Ph. D., joined Georgia Tech in 1987 as the Parker H. Petit Distinguished Chair for Engineering in Medicine. He is an Institute Professor and Parker H. Petit Distinguished Chair Emeritus. He currently serves as the Director of the Georgia Tech/Emory Center (GTEC) for Regenerative Medicine, a center established with an NSF- Engineering Research award. He also is a part-time Distinguished Visiting Professor at Chonbuk National University in Korea. He received his Ph.D. in 1964 from

116 APPENDIX A Ohio State University and is the author of more than 200 publications. He is a Fellow and was the founding President of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (1992-1994), and he is past President of the Tissue Engineering Society International, the forerunner of the Tissue Engineering and Regenerative medicine International Society (TERMIS). In addition, he was the part-time Senior Advisor for Bioengineering in the new National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the National Institutes of Health (2003-2006). In 1988 Professor Nerem was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and he served on the NAE Council (1998- 2004). In 1992 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and in 1998 a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 1994 he was elected a Foreign Member of the Polish Academy of Sciences, and in 1998 he was made an Honorary Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers in the United Kingdom. In 2004 he was elected an honorary foreign member of the Japan Society for Medical and Biological Engineering and in 2006 a Foreign Member of the Swedish Royal Academy of Engineering Sciences. Professor Nerem holds honorary doctorates from the University of Paris, Imperial College London, and Illinois Institute of Technology. In 2008 he was selected by NAE for the Founders Award. SUZANNE ORTEGA, Ph.D., assumed the position of provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at the University of New Mexico on August 1, 2008. From 2005 to 2008 she served as dean and vice provost of the graduate school at the University of Washington and from 2000 to 2005 as vice provost for advanced studies and dean of the graduate school at the University of Missouri–Columbia (MU). She received a bachelor's degree in sociology from Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, Tennessee, and a master's and doctorate in sociology from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Ortega was at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln from 1980 to 2000, rising from assistant professor to associate dean of graduate studies and professor. Her most important administrative accomplishments include securing funding for the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Degree, Preparing Future Faculty, Diversity Enhancement, and Ph.D. Completion programs. Dr. Ortega has served as chair of the board of the Council of Graduate Schools, chair of the Graduate Record Examination Board, and chair of the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools. She has served on the executive committee of the Council on Research Policy and Graduate Education of NASULGC. She has also served on the American Sociological Association (ASA) Advisory Board for Preparing Future Faculty, the ASA Executive Office and Budget Committee, and NSF’s Human Resources Expert Panel. She is the author of numerous articles and an introductory sociology textbook, now in its seventh edition. ROBERT SPINRAD, Ph.D. (NAE), now deceased, served as Vice President, Technology Strategy for Xerox. He joined Xerox in 1968, and over the years held a variety of research and technology management positions, including that of Director of Xerox PARC (Palo Alto Research Center). Prior to that, Dr. Spinrad worked as a Senior Scientist at Brookhaven National Laboratory. He received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and an M.S. in Electrical Engineering and a B.S. in Engineering from Columbia University. He was a Bridgham Fellow at Columbia and a Whitney Fellow at MIT. He was also a licensed

APPENDIX A 117 Professional Engineer (New York). Dr. Spinrad was a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He served on the Boards of the California Council on Science and Technology and the Pardee RAND Graduate School. He was also a member of the NASA Ames Executive Forum and the National Research Council's Committee on An Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs. Dr. Spinrad served in various advisory and contributing roles for Harvard, Stanford, MIT, the University of California, the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Library of Congress, the National Research Council, the National Science Foundation, DARPA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Livermore National Laboratory, EDUCOM, Bell Laboratories and the Encyclopedia of Science & Technology. CATHARINE R. STIMPSON, Ph.D., is University Professor and Dean Emerita of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at New York University. She earned an A.B. from Bryn Mawr College; a B.A. and M.A. from Newnham College, Cambridge University; and a Ph.D. from Columbia University. Dr. Stimpson was a member of the English Department of Barnard College from 1963 to 1980, where she was the first director of the Women's Center and the founding editor of Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society for the University of Chicago Press. In 1981 she became professor of English at Rutgers University, then dean of the graduate school, vice provost for graduate education, and university professor. She was also the first director of the Institute for Research on Women. While at Rutgers, Dr. Stimpson continued to teach while she served as director of the MacArthur Foundation Fellows Program (1994–1997). She is a former chair of the New York State Humanities Council and the National Council for Research on Women as well as past president of the Modern Language Association. Dr. Stimpson also served as president of the Association of Graduate Schools in 2000–2001. She holds honorary degrees from several universities and colleges, including Upsala, Bates, Hamilton, and the University of Arizona. Dr. Stimpson's publications include the book Where the Meanings Are: Feminism and Cultural Spaces, and a novel, Class Notes. She has edited seven books, has served as co-editor of the Library of America's Gertrude Stein: Writings 1903–1932 and Gertrude Stein: Writings 1932–1946, and has published over 150 monographs, essays, stories, and reviews. RICHARD P. WHEELER, Ph.D., is interim vice chancellor for academic affairs and vice provost at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He received his Ph.D. in English from the State University of Buffalo in 1970. He joined the Department of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1969 and has been on the Illinois faculty ever since. From 1987 to 1997 he headed the Department of English, and in 1999–2000 he was acting head of the Department of Anthropology. From 2000 to 2009 he served as dean of the graduate college. He has chaired the executive committee of the Midwest Association of Graduate Schools, the Graduate Deans Group of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, and the executive committee of the board of the Council of Graduate Schools. His scholarly publications include Shakespeare’s Development and the Problem Comedies: Turn and Counter-Turn (U of California P, 1981), The Whole Journey: Shakespeare’s Power of Development (co-authored, U of California P, 1986), Creating Elizabethan Tragedy (ed., U of Chicago P, 1988), Critical Essays on Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure (ed., G.K. Hall, 1999), and articles on

118 APPENDIX A Shakespeare, renaissance drama, and modern British literature. His scholarship has been largely directed toward identifying key psychological patterns that shape the development of Shakespeare’s work and, more recently, plausible links between the plays and the life of their author.

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A Data-Based Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States provides an unparalleled dataset that can be used to assess the quality and effectiveness of doctoral programs based on measures important to faculty, students, administrators, funders, and other stakeholders.

The data, collected for the 2005-2006 academic year from more than 5,000 doctoral programs at 212 universities, covers 62 fields. Included for each program are such characteristics as faculty publications, grants, and awards; student GRE scores, financial support, and employment outcomes; and program size, time to degree, and faculty composition. Measures of faculty and student diversity are also included.

The book features analysis of selected findings across six broad fields: agricultural sciences, biological and health sciences, engineering, physical and mathematical sciences, social and behavioral sciences, and humanities, as well as a discussion of trends in doctoral education since the last assessment in 1995, and suggested uses of the data . It also includes a detailed explanation of the methodology used to collect data and calculate ranges of illustrative rankings.

Included with the book is a comprehensive CD-ROM with a data table in Microsoft Excel. In addition to data on the characteristics of individual programs, the data table contains illustrative ranges of rankings for each program, as well as ranges of rankings for three dimensions of program quality: (1) research activity, (2) student support and outcomes, and (3) diversity of the academic environment.

As an aid to users, the data table is offered with demonstrations of some Microsoft Excel features that may enhance the usability of the spreadsheet, such as hiding and unhiding columns, copying and pasting columns to a new worksheet, and filtering and sorting data. Also provided with the data table are a set of scenarios that show how typical users may want to extract data from the spreadsheet.

PhDs.org, an independent website not affiliated with the National Research Council, incorporated data from the research-doctorate assessment into its Graduate School Guide. Users of the Guide can choose the weights assigned to the program characteristics measured by the National Research Council and others, and rank graduate programs according to their own priorities.

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