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Page 43
Suggested Citation:"Credits." Institute of Medicine. 2011. What You Need to Know About Infectious Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13006.
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Credits

This publication was written by Madeline Drexler, a Boston-based journalist specializing in science, medicine, and public health. Drexler is author of Emerging Epidemics: The Menace of New Infections (Penguin, 2010). She is editor of the Harvard Public Health Review and is a senior fellow at Brandeis University’s Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism.


The text was edited by Stephen Mautner and Terrell Smith in collaboration with Eileen Choffnes. The publication was designed by Francesca Moghari. Production was managed by Dorothy Lewis.


We would like to thank James W. Curran, M.D.; James M. Hughes, M.D.; Stanley Falkow; and Mary E. Wilson, M.D., for their careful review of the content and their patient responses to queries.


The publication of this booklet and the creation of an accompanying website were supported by a generous grant from the Life Technologies Foundation (www.lifetechnologies.com/global-citizenship/Community/life-technologies-foundation.html).


Copyright 2011 by the National Academy of Sciences.


All rights reserved.


Printed on recycled paper.

Page 44
Suggested Citation:"Credits." Institute of Medicine. 2011. What You Need to Know About Infectious Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13006.
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Illustration Credits:


1 (b) iStockphoto; 2 © PhotoDisc; 4 (b) © Digital Stock; 5 (l) iStockphoto; (r) Cynthia Goldsmith/CDC; 6 © Dennis Kunkel Microscopy, Inc.; 7 (t) iStockphoto; (b) © PhotoDisc; 8 (both) James Gathany/CDC; 9 artwork based on drawings by Kathryn Born; 10 Getty Images; 12 (l) © Corbis; (r) iStockphoto; 13 (l) iStockphoto; (r) © 2010 Star Tribune/Minneapolis-St.Paul; 14 (t) iStockphoto; (b) Janice Haney Carr/CDC; 15 (t) iStockphoto; (b) AFP/Getty Images; 16 Getty Images; 17 Cynthia Goldsmith/CDC; 18 iStockphoto; 19 André Roussel, USAID/Benin; 20 C. S. Goldsmith and A. Balish/CDC; 21 (l) Office of the Public Health Service Historian; (r) James Gathany/CDC; 22–23 iStockphoto; 24 (t) © PhotoDisc; (b) Janice Haney/CDC; 25 iStockphoto; 28 (t) Reprinted with permission from L. Hufnagel, D. Brockmann, and T. Geisel. 2004. Forecast and control of epidemics in a globalized world. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 101(42):15124–15129. © 2004 National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A.; (b) iStockphoto; 29–30 iStockphoto; 31 USAID; 32 (l) Laura Rose/CDC; (r) www.fbi.gov; 35 Getty Images; 36 iStockphoto; 37 James Gathany/CDC; 38 Keith Weller/USDA; 39 iStockphoto; 40 WHO, Christopher Black; 41 NASA.


The cover is a digitally colorized, negative-stained transmission electron micrograph depicting several influenza A virus particles. Credit: F. A. Murphy/CDC.

Page 43
Suggested Citation:"Credits." Institute of Medicine. 2011. What You Need to Know About Infectious Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13006.
×
Page 43
Page 44
Suggested Citation:"Credits." Institute of Medicine. 2011. What You Need to Know About Infectious Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13006.
×
Page 44
What You Need to Know About Infectious Disease Get This Book
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About a quarter of deaths worldwide--many of them children--are caused by infectious organisms. The World Health Organization reports that new infectious diseases are continuing to emerge and familiar ones are appearing in new locations around the globe. What's behind this trend? How can invisible organisms cause such harm? And to what extent has human behavior amplified the problem? What You Need to Know About Infectious Disease provides an overview of infectious disease, drawing on reports of the Institute of Medicine. Written for a general audience, it describes the biology, history, and future trends of some of the world's most widespread and harmful infections and explains what we need to do--as individuals and as a society--to address this global challenge.

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