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Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop (2010)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
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Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

RICHARD H. MOSS is a senior staff scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute. He was previously vice president and managing director for climate change at the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). His recent work includes developing conservation plans that account for changing climate and reduce greenhouse gas emissions and developing the WWF role on adapting to climate change. He has served the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as head of the technical staff of the impacts-adaptation-mitigation working group (1993-1999); as editor or coauthor of a number of IPCC reports, including the panel’s first examination of The Regional Impacts of Climate Change (1998); and as contributor to the 2007 Nobel prize-winning IPCC assessment. He also coauthored IPCC’s first methodology on consistently evaluating and communicating scientific uncertainty in assessments, used by authors of the IPCC’s Third Assessment Report. He currently serves as cochair of the IPCC Task Group on Data and Scenario Support for Impact and Climate Analysis. From 2000 to 2006, he directed the coordination office for the United States Climate Change Science Program, leading preparation of the program’s 10-year Strategic Plan (2003), which focuses on development and application of research to support decision making. He has a Ph.D. from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, an M.P.A. from Princeton University, and a B.A. from Carleton College.


KRISTIE L. EBI is executive director of IPCC Working Group II Technical Support at the Carnegie Institution. She is an epidemiologist who has

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
×

worked in the field of global climate change for 10 years. Her research focuses on potential impacts of climate variability and change, including impacts associated with extreme events, thermal stress, food-borne diseases, and vector-borne diseases, and on the design of adaptation response options to reduce current and projected future negative impacts. She is chief editor of the book Integration of Public Health with Adaptation to Climate Change: Lessons Learned and New Directions. She was a lead author for the human health chapter of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report; a convening lead author on the World Health Organization publication Methods of Assessing Human Health Vulnerability and Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change; and lead author in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and the U.S. National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change. She has more than 25 years of multidisciplinary experience in environmental issues and numerous publications. Her scientific training includes an M.S. in toxicology, Ph.D. and M.P.H. degrees in epidemiology, and two years of postgraduate research in epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.


KATHY A. HIBBARD is senior program manager at the Pacific North-west National Laboratory (PNNL) and executive officer for the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme’s (IGBP) Earth system project, the Analysis, Integration and Modeling of the Earth System (AIMES). At PNNL, she is leading a new initiative to develop an integrated regional climate, socioeconomic, and energy systems model. Her major area of scientific interest is understanding the consequences of disturbance (natural and anthropogenically forced) to terrestrial biogeochemical cycles through field observations and modeling. Her primary focus in the AIMES project is to understand and integrate human-environmental processes (e.g., land use, emissions) in Earth system modeling. She has authored or coauthored numerous publications and two book chapters and has worked in international program development for the IGBP’s Global Carbon Project and IGBP/GAIM Task Force. She has been a member of the Ecological Society of America since 1991 and served AGU Biogeosciences from 2001 to 2004 as fall meeting program committee representative. She has B.S. and M.S. degrees from Colorado State University in biology and range science and a Ph.D. from Texas A&M University in range ecology and management.


ANTHONY C. JANETOS is director of the Joint Global Change Research Institute at the University of Maryland. He previously served as vice president of the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment, where he directed the center’s Global Change Program. He has written and spoken widely to policy, business, and scientific audiences on the need for scientific input and scientific assessment in the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
×

policy-making process and about the need to understand the scientific, environmental, economic, and policy linkages among the major global environmental issues. He has served on several national and international study teams, including working as a co-chair of the U.S. National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change. He also was an author of the IPCC’s Special Report on Land-Use Change and Forestry, the Global Biodiversity Assessment, and a coordinating lead author in the recently published Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. He is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Climate Research Committee. Janetos graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College with a bachelor’s degree in biology and has master’s and Ph.D. degrees in biology from Princeton University.


MIKIKO KAINUMA is chief of the Climate Policy Assessment Research Section at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES). She has been developing the Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) with Kyoto University and several other institutes across Asia, including China, India, Korea, and Thailand. She leads the Low-Carbon Asia Research Project, funded by the Global Environmental Research Fund of the Ministry of Environment of Japan. Since 1977 she has worked on air pollution and climate change at NIES. She was a lead author of the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report. She was a member of IPCC Task Group on New Emissions Scenarios for a possible IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. In addition she has worked on United Nations Environment Programme/Global Environment Outlook scenarios. She is an adjunct professor at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology. She has B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in applied mathematics and physics from Kyoto University.


RITU MATHUR is associate director of the Energy Environment Policy Division at The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI). An economist by training, she has used various modeling and analytical tools for developing national and sectoral level energy models to examine the prospects of future energy use patterns and their implications on the economy and environment. Over the past 15 years, she has led several projects with interdisciplinary teams, addressing such cross-cutting issues as energy pricing, environmental implications of energy use, examining mitigation options, and the potential for the country to combat climate change. She has authored several papers related to energy use and its implications on the environment at the local and global levels. She has been a key discussant at various international fora on topics related to developing country perspectives toward climate change, mitigation prospects for India, and energy-environment policy. She was part of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report approval process, in which she represented the India delegation,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
×

and has also participated at various side events at the Congressional Oversight Panel and Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice meetings on issues of interest in the international negotiation processes. She has a Ph.D. in energy science from Kyoto University.


NEBOJSA NAKIČENOVIČ is deputy director of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), professor of energy economics at the Vienna University of Technology, and director of the Global Energy Assessment. He is also a member of the United Nations Secretary General Advisory Group on Energy and Climate Change; the Advisory Council of the German Government on Global Change; the Advisory Board of the World Bank’s World Development Report 2010: Development and Climate Change; the International Council for Science Committee on Scientific Planning and Review; and the Global Carbon Project. He was a convening lead author of the IPCC’s Second Assessment Report, its Special Report on Emissions Scenarios, and the World Energy Assessment: Energy and the Challenge of Sustainability; a coordinating lead author of the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report and of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment; lead author of the IPCC’s Third Assessment Report; director of Global Energy Perspectives at the World Energy Council; a member of the International Science Panel on Renewable Energies; and guest professor at the Technical University of Graz. Among his research interests are the long-term patterns of technological change, economic development and response to climate change, and, in particular, the evolution of energy, mobility, information, and communication technologies. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees in economics and computer science from Princeton University and the University of Vienna, where he also completed a Ph.D. He also has an honoris causa Ph.D. degree in engineering from the Russian Academy of Sciences.


PAUL C. STERN is a principal staff officer at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS)/NRC, director of its Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change, and study director for this panel. His research interests include the determinants of environmentally significant behavior, particularly at the individual level; participatory processes for informing environmental decision making; processes for informing environmental decisions; and the governance of environmental resources and risks. He is coauthor of the textbook Environmental Problems and Human Behavior, Second Edition (2002); coeditor of numerous NRC publications, including Public Participation in Environmental Assessment and Decision Making (2008), Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Priorities (2005), The Drama of the Commons (2002), Making Climate Forecasts Matter (1999), Environmentally Significant Consumption: Research Directions (1997),

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
×

Understanding Risk (1996), Global Environmental Change: Understanding the Human Dimensions (1992), and Energy Use: The Human Dimension (1984). He directed the study that produced Informing Decisions in a Changing Climate (2009). He coauthored the article “The Struggle to Govern the Commons,” which was published in Science in 2003 and won the 2005 Sustainability Science Award from the Ecological Society of America. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association. He holds a B.A. from Amherst College and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Clark University, all in psychology.


THOMAS J. WILBANKS is a corporate research fellow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and leads its Global Change and Developing Country Programs. A past president of the Association of American Geographers, he conducts research on such issues as sustainable development, energy and environmental technology and policy, responses to global climate change, and the role of geographical scale in all of these regards. Coedited recent books include Global Change and Local Places (2003), Geographical Dimensions of Terrorism (2003), and Bridging Scales and Knowledge Systems: Linking Global Science and Local Knowledge (2006). Wilbanks is a member of the NRC’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, chair of the NRC’s Committee on Human Dimensions of Global Change, and a member of a number of other NAS/NRC activities. He is a coordinating lead author for the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report, Working Group II, Chapter 7 (Industry, Settlement, and Society); coordinating lead author for the Climate Change Science Program’s Synthesis and Assessment Product (SAP) 4.5 (Effects of Climate Change on Energy Production and Use in the United States); and lead author for one of three sections (Effects of Global Change on Human Settlements) of SAP 4.6 (Effects of Global Change on Human Health and Welfare and Human Systems). He has a B.A. in social sciences from Trinity University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from Syracuse University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
×
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
×
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
×
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
×
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13007.
×
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The implications of climate change for the environment and society depend on the rate and magnitude of climate change, but also on changes in technology, economics, lifestyles, and policy that will affect the capacity both for limiting and adapting to climate change. Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment reviews the state of science for considering socioeconomic changes over long time frames and clarifies definitions and concepts to facilitate communication across research communities. The book also explores driving forces and key uncertainties that will affect impacts, adaptation, vulnerability and mitigation in the future. Furthermore, it considers research needs and the elements of a strategy for describing socioeconomic and environmental futures for climate change research and assessment.

Describing Socioeconomic Futures for Climate Change Research and Assessment explores the current state of science in scenario development and application, asserting that while little attention has been given to preparing quantitative and narrative socioeconomic information, advances in computing capacity are making development of such probabilistic scenarios a reality. It also addresses a number of specific methodological challenges and opportunities and discusses opportunities for a next round of assessments.

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