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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Collaboration on Space and Earth Science Missions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13042.
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E
Meeting Agendas

JULY 30-31, 2009

KECK CENTER, 500 FIFTH STREET, NW

WASHINGTON, D.C.


July 30, 2009

Open Sessions

11:00 a.m.

Videoconference with Mike Freilich, Earth Science Division Director, NASA HQ

12:00 p.m.

Continue Discussions/Lunch

1:00

Discussion with A. Thomas Young, Executive Vice President, Lockheed Martin Corp. (retired) and member of the committee

1:45

Discussion with Tom Karl, Director NOAA NCDC (via videoconference) and Jeff Privette, NOAA NCDC

2:45

Discussion with Bob Winokur, Technical Director, Oceanographer of the Navy

3:15

Panel on NASA-DOE Cooperation

  • Anne Kinney, Director, Solar System Exploration Division, NASA GSFC

  • Paul Hertz, Chief Scientist, Science Mission Directorate, NASA HQ

  • Robin Staffin, Director for Basic Research, OSD

  • Kathy Turner, Office of High Energy Physics, DOE

  • Persis Drell, Director, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (via teleconference)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Collaboration on Space and Earth Science Missions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13042.
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July 31, 2009


Open Sessions

9:30 a.m.

Discussion with Pam Whitney, Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee, House S&T Committee

9:50

Discussions with Staff from OMB and OSTP

  • Amy Kaminski, OMB

  • Robie Samanta-Roy, OSTP

  • Damon Wells, OSTP

  • Phil DeCola, OSTP

10:50

Lessons from the Landsat Program

Darrel Williams and Jim Irons, NASA GSFC

11:30

Discussion with Paul Menzel, University of Wisconsin (via videoconference)

12:00 p.m.

Continue Discussions/Lunch

1:00

Discussion with Colleen Hartman, George Washington University

1:30

“Policy Issues and Challenges for Interagency Space Systems Acquisition” Dana Johnson, Northrop

2:15

Discussion with Ron Sega, Colorado State University (invited)

SEPTEMBER 30-OCTOBER 1, 2009

KECK CENTER, 500 FIFTH STREET, NW

WASHINGTON, D.C.


September 30, 2009


Not Open to the Public Session

9:00 a.m.

Meeting Objectives

Jim Baker and Dan Baker, Committee Co-chairs

Open Session

10:00

Discussions with Dick Obermann, Staff Director, House Science and Technology Committee, Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics

Not Open to the Public Session

11:00

Committee Discussions

Mission Cost, Schedule, and Complexity Impacts from Multi-Agency and Foreign Partner Contributions

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Collaboration on Space and Earth Science Missions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13042.
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Open Sessions

12:00 p.m.

Continue Discussions/Lunch

1:00

The Senior Review Process at NASA’s Earth Science Division

Mike Freilich, NASA (tentative)

2:00

Discussion with Mary Kicza, NOAA Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services

Not Open to the Public Session

3:15

Committee Discussions

Finalize report outline

Assign writing teams

Discussion of presentations and related materials from meeting 1

6:30

Working Dinner for the Committee

October 1, 2009


Not Open to the Public Session

9:00 a.m.

Committee Discussions

Open Session

9:30

Discussion with Geoff Pendleton, Dynetics Corporation

10:30

Discussions among Committee and Guests

11:00

Teleconference with Alan Stern, SWRI (tentative)

12:00 p.m.

Working Lunch/Committee Discussions

Not Open to the Public Session

1:00

Committee Discussions/Begin Writing Assignments

4:00

Meeting Adjourns

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Collaboration on Space and Earth Science Missions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13042.
×
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Collaboration on Space and Earth Science Missions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13042.
×
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2011. Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Collaboration on Space and Earth Science Missions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13042.
×
Page 61
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Through an examination of case studies, agency briefings, and existing reports, and drawing on personal knowledge and direct experience, the Committee on Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Cooperation on Space and Earth Science Missions found that candidate projects for multiagency collaboration in the development and implementation of Earth-observing or space science missions are often intrinsically complex and, therefore costly, and that a multiagency approach to developing these missions typically results in additional complexity and cost. Advocates of collaboration have sometimes underestimated the difficulties and associated costs and risks of dividing responsibility and accountability between two or more partners; they also discount the possibility that collaboration will increase the risk in meeting performance objectives.

This committee's principal recommendation is that agencies should conduct Earth and space science projects independently unless:

  • It is judged that cooperation will result in significant added scientific value to the project over what could be achieved by a single agency alone; or
  • Unique capabilities reside within one agency that are necessary for the mission success of a project managed by another agency; or
  • The project is intended to transfer from research to operations necessitating a change in responsibility from one agency to another during the project; or
  • There are other compelling reasons to pursue collaboration, for example, a desire to build capacity at one of the cooperating agencies.

Even when the total project cost may increase, parties may still find collaboration attractive if their share of a mission is more affordable than funding it alone. In these cases, alternatives to interdependent reliance on another government agency should be considered. For example, agencies may find that buying services from another agency or pursuing interagency coordination of spaceflight data collection is preferable to fully interdependent cooperation.

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