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National Earthquake Resilience: Research, Implementation, and Outreach (2011)

Chapter: Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2011. National Earthquake Resilience: Research, Implementation, and Outreach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13092.
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Appendix F

Acronyms and Abbreviations

AEL

Annualized Earthquake Loss

AELR

Annualized Earthquake Loss Ratios

ALA

American Lifelines Alliance

ANSS

Advanced National Seismic System

ARRA

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

ASCE

American Society of Civil Engineers

ATC

Applied Technology Council

 

 

BSSC

Building Seismic Safety Council

 

 

CARRI

Community and Regional Resilience Institute

CDMS

Comprehensive Data Management System

CGE

Computable General Equilibrium

CISN

California Integrated Seismic Network

CLEANER

Collaborative Large-Scale Engineering Analysis Network for Environmental Research

CREW

Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup

CUREE

Consortium of Universities for Research in Earthquake Engineering

CUSEC

Central U.S. Earthquake Consortium

 

 

DELM

Direct Economic Loss Modules

DHS

Department of Homeland Security

DOGAMI

Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2011. National Earthquake Resilience: Research, Implementation, and Outreach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13092.
×
DRC

Southwest Indiana Disaster Resistant Community Corporation

DSER

direct static economic resilience

 

 

EERI

Earthquake Engineering Research Institute

EEW

earthquake early warning

 

 

FEMA

Federal Emergency Management Agency

 

 

GEER

Geotechnical Extreme Event Reconnaissance Association

GIS

Geographic Information System

GPS

Global Positioning System

 

 

HAZUS

FEMA’s Hazards U.S.

HAZUS-MH

Hazards U.S.-Multi-Hazard

HUGs

HAZUS User Groups

 

 

I-O

Input-Output

IDFBS

Indiana Department of Fire and Building Services

IELM

Indirect Economic Loss Modules

IIPLR

Insurance Institute for Property Loss Reduction

InSAR

Interferometic Synthetic Aperture Radar

ISDR

The United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction

 

 

LFE

Learning from Earthquakes program, managed by EERI

LiDAR

Light Detection and Ranging

LTER

Long-Term Ecological Research

 

 

MAE

Mid-America Earthquake Center

MCEER

Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research

MP

Mathematical programming

 

 

NCSA

National Center for Supercomputer Applications

NEES

Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation

NEHRP

National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program

NEIC

The National Earthquake Information Center

NEON

National Ecological Observatory Network

NEPEC

National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council

NGA

Next Generation Attenuation

NHRAIC

Natural Hazards Research Applications and Information Center

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2011. National Earthquake Resilience: Research, Implementation, and Outreach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13092.
×
NIBS

National Institute of Building Sciences

NIPP

Department of Homeland Security’s Infrastructure Protection Program

NIST

National Institute of Standards and Technology

NRC

National Research Council

NSF

National Science Foundation

NSTC

National Science and Technology Council

 

 

OES

California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services

OpenSees

Open System for Earthquake Engineering Simulation

 

 

PEER

Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center

PGA

Peak Ground Acceleration

PIMS

Post-earthquake Information Management System

 

 

R&D

research and development

RAVON

Resiliency and Vulnerability Observatory Network

ROVER

Rapid Observation of Vulnerability and Estimation of Risk

 

 

SEAW

Structural Engineers Association of Washington

SPUR

San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association—Resilient City Initiative

STEP

Short-Term Earthquake Probability

 

 

TCLEE

Technical Council on Lifeline Earthquake Engineering

 

 

UCERF2

Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast—Version 2

USGS

U.S. Geological Survey

URM

unreinforced masonry

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2011. National Earthquake Resilience: Research, Implementation, and Outreach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13092.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2011. National Earthquake Resilience: Research, Implementation, and Outreach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13092.
×
Page 261
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2011. National Earthquake Resilience: Research, Implementation, and Outreach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13092.
×
Page 262
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2011. National Earthquake Resilience: Research, Implementation, and Outreach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13092.
×
Page 263
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2011. National Earthquake Resilience: Research, Implementation, and Outreach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13092.
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The United States will certainly be subject to damaging earthquakes in the future. Some of these earthquakes will occur in highly populated and vulnerable areas. Coping with moderate earthquakes is not a reliable indicator of preparedness for a major earthquake in a populated area. The recent, disastrous, magnitude-9 earthquake that struck northern Japan demonstrates the threat that earthquakes pose. Moreover, the cascading nature of impacts-the earthquake causing a tsunami, cutting electrical power supplies, and stopping the pumps needed to cool nuclear reactors-demonstrates the potential complexity of an earthquake disaster. Such compound disasters can strike any earthquake-prone populated area. National Earthquake Resilience presents a roadmap for increasing our national resilience to earthquakes.

The National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) is the multi-agency program mandated by Congress to undertake activities to reduce the effects of future earthquakes in the United States. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-the lead NEHRP agency-commissioned the National Research Council (NRC) to develop a roadmap for earthquake hazard and risk reduction in the United States that would be based on the goals and objectives for achieving national earthquake resilience described in the 2008 NEHRP Strategic Plan. National Earthquake Resilience does this by assessing the activities and costs that would be required for the nation to achieve earthquake resilience in 20 years.

National Earthquake Resilience interprets resilience broadly to incorporate engineering/science (physical), social/economic (behavioral), and institutional (governing) dimensions. Resilience encompasses both pre-disaster preparedness activities and post-disaster response. In combination, these will enhance the robustness of communities in all earthquake-vulnerable regions of our nation so that they can function adequately following damaging earthquakes. While National Earthquake Resilience is written primarily for the NEHRP, it also speaks to a broader audience of policy makers, earth scientists, and emergency managers.

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