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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2011. Chemistry in Primetime and Online: Communicating Chemistry in Informal Environments: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13106.
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B

Workshop Agenda

The National Academy of Sciences Building
Lecture Room
2100 C Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C.




AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, May 26, 2010

8:00 a.m. Welcome
Bill Carroll and Mark Cardillo
   
8:15 a.m. Introduction to Informal Learning
Chair, Mark Cardillo
Kirsten Ellenbogen, Science Museum of Minnesota
   
9:15 a.m. Panel 1: Informal Chemistry
Chair, Mark Cardillo
David Ucko, National Science Foundation
Stephen Lyons, Moreno-Lyons Productions
   
10:30 a.m. Break
   
10:45 a.m. Panel 2: Chemistry in Print
Chair, Mike Rogers
John Emsley (via webcast), University of Cambridge
Ivan Amato, Pew Charitable Trusts
Joy Moore, Seed Media Group
   
12:00 a.m. Lunch
   
1:00 p.m. Panel 3: Local Outreach Efforts
Chair, Bill Carroll
Jeannette Brown, New Jersey American Chemical Society (ACS) Local Section
Ruth Woodall, Nashville ACS Local Section
Catherine Conrad, St. Mary’s University
   
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2011. Chemistry in Primetime and Online: Communicating Chemistry in Informal Environments: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13106.
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2:15 p.m. Panel 4: Chemistry in Museums
Chair, Mark Barteau
Sapna Batish and Erika Shugart, Koshland Science Museum
Susanne Rehn (via webcast), Deutsches Museum
Shelley Geehr, Chemical Heritage Foundation
Peter Yancone, Maryland Science Center
   
3:40 p.m. Break
   
3:55 p.m. Open Discussion
Chair, Bill Carroll
   
5:00 p.m. Interactive Media “Poster” Session
   
7:00 p.m. Adjourn
   
THURSDAY, May 27, 2010
   
8:00 a.m. Panel 5: Chemistry in Video and on the Radio
Chair, Sharon Haynie
Martyn Poliakoff (via webcast), University of Nottingham
Jorge Salazar, EarthSky Communications
Mark Griep, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
   
9:15 a.m. Panel 6: Tools and Techniques
Chair, Jim Solyst
Robert Hone, Red Hill Studios
Deborah Illman (via webcast), University of Washington
Andrea Twiss-Brooks, University of Chicago
   
10:30 a.m. Wrap-up Panel
Chair, Bill Carroll
David Ucko, National Science Foundation
Nancy Blount, American Chemical Society
Joy Moore, Seed Media Group
Mark Barteau, University of Delaware
   
12:00 p.m. Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2011. Chemistry in Primetime and Online: Communicating Chemistry in Informal Environments: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13106.
×
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2011. Chemistry in Primetime and Online: Communicating Chemistry in Informal Environments: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13106.
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Page 76
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It is critical that we increase public knowledge and understanding of science and technology issues through formal and informal learning for the United States to maintain its competitive edge in today's global economy. Since most Americans learn about science outside of school, we must take advantage of opportunities to present chemistry content on television, the Internet, in museums, and in other informal educational settings.

In May 2010, the National Academies' Chemical Sciences Roundtable held a workshop to examine how the public obtains scientific information informally and to discuss methods that chemists can use to improve and expand efforts to reach a general, nontechnical audience. Workshop participants included chemical practitioners (e.g., graduate students, postdocs, professors, administrators); experts on informal learning; public and private funding organizations; science writers, bloggers, publishers, and university communications officers; and television and Internet content producers. Chemistry in Primetime and Online is a factual summary of what occurred in that workshop.

Chemistry in Primetime and Online examines science content, especially chemistry, in various informal educational settings. It explores means of measuring recognition and retention of the information presented in various media formats and settings. Although the report does not provide any conclusions or recommendations about needs and future directions, it does discuss the need for chemists to connect more with professional writers, artists, or videographers, who know how to communicate with and interest general audiences. It also emphasizes the importance of formal education in setting the stage for informal interactions with chemistry and chemists.

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