National Academies Press: OpenBook

Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future (2011)

Chapter: Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants

« Previous: Appendix A: Committee Biographical Sketches
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
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Appendix B

Workshop Agenda and Participants

AGENDA

Monday, May 5, 2008
9:00 Welcome Statement Dick Norris
 
9:30 PLENARY ADDRESS:  
  Simulating Earth’s Climate: Past, Present, & Future Jeff Kiehl
 
10:30 PLENARY ADDRESS:  
  Rapid Environmental Change and Feedbacks: Jim Zachos
  Lessons from Deep Time  
 
11:00-12:30 BREAKOUT I
 
Events and Transitions, Tipping Points, and Thresholds
 

Question 1: What evidence can we use to identify thresholds and tipping points in the geologic record?

 

Question 2: What are the best parts of the record to target—and what are the proxies to use—to describe and categorize thresholds and tipping points in the record? What are the nonlinear processes that determine critical “tipping points,” and are these processes well represented in climate models and in biota-climate models?

 
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×
1:30 PLENARY ADDRESS:  
  Carbon Cycling and Climate Sensitivity Across the Paleocene-Eocene boundary Richard Zeebe
 
2:00-3:30 BREAKOUT II
Coupling and Decoupling Climate Sensitivity
 

Question 3: What physical and biogeochemical feedback processes are most important in determining the climate sensitivity to a large dynamic range of forcing?

 

Question 4: What can deep-time records and models tell us about climate sensitivity?

 
4:00-5:30 BREAKOUT REPORTS—Questions 1-4
 
Tuesday, May 6, 2008
9:00 NSF Hopes and Expectations Rich Lane
 
9:30 PLENARY ADDRESS:  
  Dinosaur Forecast—Cloudy! A Convective-Cloud Mechanism for Past Equable Climates and Its Role in Future Greenhouse Scenarios. Eli Tziperman
 
10:30-2:00 BREAKOUT III  
 
Alternative Worlds
 

Question 5: What are the most poorly understood dynamics of past “alternative worlds,” and which “alternative world” intervals offer the greatest potential for understanding future climates?

 

Question 6: What kinds of proxy evidence do we need to advance understanding of the dominant processes that operate in these “alternative world” intervals?

 
1:00-2:30 BREAKOUT IV  
 
Implementation and Infrastructure
 

Question 7: Describe the infrastructure that will be required to answer these questions?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×
 

Question 8: How do we improve interactions between deep-time data/model research?

 

Question 9: What are the best options for additional paleoenvironmental and geochronological proxies (e.g., biomarkers and isotopes of biomarkers)?

 
3:00-4:30 BREAKOUT REPORTS—Questions 5-9  
 
4:30 Wrap-up and Thanks Dick Norris
5:00 Adjourn  

WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS

Thomas Algeo

Department of Geology

University of Cincinnati

David Beerling

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences

University of Sheffield

Karen Bice

Department of Geology and Geophysics

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Gabe Bowen

Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences

Purdue University

Mark A. Chandler

Center for Climate Systems Research

Columbia University

Goddard Institute for Space Studies

Robert DeConto

Department of Geosciences

University of Massachusetts

Harry Dowsett

U.S. Geological Survey

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×

Anthony R. de Souza

Board on Earth Sciences and Resources

National Research Council

David Feary

Board on Earth Sciences and Resources

National Research Council

Alexey Fedorov

Department of Geology and Geophysics

Yale University

Christopher Fielding

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Margaret Frasier

Department of Geosciences

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Katherine H. Freeman

Department of Geosciences

The Pennsylvania State University

Linda Gundersen

U.S. Geological Survey

Patricia Jellison

U.S. Geological Survey

Kirk R. Johnson

Denver Museum of Nature and Science

Martin J. Kennedy

Department of Earth Sciences

University of California, Riverside

Dennis V. Kent (NAS)

Department of Geological Sciences

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Jeffrey T. Kiehl

National Center for Atmospheric Research

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×

H. Richard Lane

National Science Foundation

Timothy Lyons

Department of Earth Sciences

University of California, Riverside

Isabel P. Montañez

Geology Department

University of California, Davis

Thomas Moore

PaleoTerra

Richard D. Norris

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

University of California, San Diego

Paul Olsen (NAS)

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Columbia University

Mark Pagani

Department of Geology and Geophysics

Yale University

Martin Perlmutter

Chevron Energy Technology Company

Christopher Poulsen

Department of Geological Sciences

University of Michigan

A. Christina Ravelo

Department of Ocean Sciences

University of California, Santa Cruz

Greg Ravizza

Department of Geology and Geophysics

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×

Nicholas Rogers

Board on Earth Sciences and Resources

National Research Council

David Rowley

Department of the Geophysical Sciences

University of Chicago

Dana Royer

Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Wesleyan University

Nathan Sheldon

Department of Geological Sciences

University of Michigan

Christine Shields

Climate Change Research

National Center for Atmospheric Research

Linda Sohl

Center for Climate Systems Research

Columbia University

Lynn Soreghan

College of Earth and Energy

School of Geology and Geophysics

University of Oklahoma

Christopher Swezey

U.S. Geological Survey

Karl K. Turekian (NAS)

Department of Geology and Geophysics

Yale University

Eli Tziperman

Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Harvard University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×

Thomas Wagner

Institute for Research on Environment and Sustainability

Newcastle University

Debra Willard

U.S. Geological Survey

Scott Wing

Smithsonian Institution

Jim Zachos

Earth and Planetary Sciences Department

University of California, Santa Cruz

Richard Zeebe

Department of Oceanography

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×
Page 185
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×
Page 186
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×
Page 187
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×
Page 188
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×
Page 189
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×
Page 190
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2011. Understanding Earth's Deep Past: Lessons for Our Climate Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13111.
×
Page 191
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There is little dispute within the scientific community that humans are changing Earth's climate on a decadal to century time-scale. By the end of this century, without a reduction in emissions, atmospheric CO2 is projected to increase to levels that Earth has not experienced for more than 30 million years. As greenhouse gas emissions propel Earth toward a warmer climate state, an improved understanding of climate dynamics in warm environments is needed to inform public policy decisions. In Understanding Earth's Deep Past, the National Research Council reports that rocks and sediments that are millions of years old hold clues to how the Earth's future climate would respond in an environment with high levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases.

Understanding Earth's Deep Past provides an assessment of both the demonstrated and underdeveloped potential of the deep-time geologic record to inform us about the dynamics of the global climate system. The report describes past climate changes, and discusses potential impacts of high levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases on regional climates, water resources, marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and the cycling of life-sustaining elements. While revealing gaps in scientific knowledge of past climate states, the report highlights a range of high priority research issues with potential for major advances in the scientific understanding of climate processes. This proposed integrated, deep-time climate research program would study how climate responded over Earth's different climate states, examine how climate responds to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, and clarify the processes that lead to anomalously warm polar and tropical regions and the impact on marine and terrestrial life.

In addition to outlining a research agenda, Understanding Earth's Deep Past proposes an implementation strategy that will be an invaluable resource to decision-makers in the field, as well as the research community, advocacy organizations, government agencies, and college professors and students.

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