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National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (2011)

Chapter: Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×

Appendix B

Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics1

FACTS:

1. PEOPLE

— Civilian employee work years (FTE’s), FY 2011: 23,232

— Military personnel authorized: 294

2. DIVISIONS & DISTRICTS:

— Number of division offices with Civil Works mission: 8

— Number of district offices: 38

3. FUNDING:

Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations: $5.657 billion

— Regular Appropriation: $5.440 billion

— Supplemental Appropriations: $217 million

  • — Construction: $2.031 billion
  • — Operation and Maintenance: $2.573 billion
  • — Mississippi River and Tributaries: $359 million
  • — Investigations (e.g. new project studies): $165 million
  • — Regulatory Program: $190 million
  • — Formerly Used Sites Remedial Action Pgm. (FUSRAP radiological environmental cleanup): $134 million
  • — Flood Control and Coastal Emergencies: $20 million
  • — Expenses and Other: $185 million

______________

1 Statistics are for September 30, 2010, unless otherwise specified

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×

— Other Revenue (estimated)

  • — Non-federal (cost-sharing—estimated): $893 million
  • — Coastal Wetlands Restoration Trust: $85 million
  • — Permanent appropriation: $17 million

— Total program: $6.652 billion

4. FUNDING BY BUSINESS LINE, FY 2010 appropriations:

  • — Navigation: $1.822 billion (32.1%)
  • — Flood Risk Management: $1.942 billion (34.2%)
  • — Environmental (Including FUSRAP& Infrastructure): $984 million (17.4%)
  • — Regulatory Programs: $190 million (3.3%)
  • — Hydropower: $211 million (3.7%)
  • — Recreation: $284 million (5%)
  • — Emergency Management: $34 million (0.6%)
  • — Water Supply: $5 million (0.1%)
  • — Executive Direction & Other: $185 million (3.3%)

5. APPROPRIATIONS FOR CIVIL WORKS, PAST 50 YEARS (FY 1961-2010): $176,370,623,000

— Adjusted for inflation to Sep 2010: $358,473,303,000

6. PROJECTS UNDER CONSTRUCTION, FY 10: 1,167

— Specifically authorized by Congress: 434

  • — Flood Risk Management: 191
  • — Hydropower: 5
  • — Navigation: 147
  • — Environmental (Including FUSRAP): 39
  • — Environmental Infrastructure: 52

— “Continuing Authorities” Projects: 733 (Nine authorities, including environmental)

7. FUNDS OBLIGATED, FY 2010 (Current program and prior year funding carryover): $11,584,480,700

8. CONTRACTS LET, FY09: $9.07 billion

  • — To Small Businesses: $3.87 billion (42.7%)
  • — Small Disadvantaged Firms: $973 million (10.7%)

9. DAMS owned/operated by Corps (all purposes) 692

  • — Dams built by Corps but operated by others: 103
  • — Tallest dam: Dworshak Dam, North Fork Clearwater River, ID, 717 ft.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×

10. REAL ESTATE

— USACE owns 136,000 land tracts, totaling more than 7.6 million acres (~11,875 square miles)

— USACE manages another 4.1 million acres (~6,400 square miles)

— Total lake surface area at full pool: 26.25 million acres (41,015 square miles–area slightly larger than Kentucky)

— Largest lake: Lake Oahe, ND & SD, 587.5 square miles

11. NAVIGATION

— States served by Corps ports & waterways: 41 (including all States east of Mississippi River)

— Commercial inland channels operated/ maintained: 12,000 miles

— Percentage of U.S. domestic freight carried by water (by ton-miles, 2007, excluding air & pipeline): 16%

— Navigation lock chambers: 238 at 192 sites

  • — Locks chambers in operation over 50 years old: 138; Average age of locks: 58 years
  • — Combined lift of all Corps locks: 6,498 ft.
  • — Highest: John Day Lock, Columbia R., OR, 110 ft.
  • — Most cargo moved: Ohio River Lock #52, 80 million tons (2009)

— Coastal, Great Lakes and inland harbors maintained by Corps: 926

  • — Harbors handling over 250,000 tons of cargo: 183 (111 coastal, 46 Great Lakes, 26 inland) (2009)
  • — Port handling most cargo: South Louisiana, 212.6 million tons (2009)
  • — Value of foreign commerce handled at ports (2009): $1.156 trillion

— Tonnage handled by U.S. ports and waterways (2009): 2,211 million tons

  • — Inbound foreign: 858.9 million tons, Outbound foreign: 494.8 million tons, Domestic: 857.1 million tons
  • — Major commodities: Crude oil, 515.3 million tons; petroleum
    products, 501.1 million tons;
    coal & coke, 290.9 million tons;
    food & farm products, 279 million tons

12. DREDGING

— Material dredged (construction and maintenance, 2009): 263.6 million cubic yards—enough to fill a football field to a depth of 12 miles

— Cost: $1,344.1 million. Average cost per cubic yard: $5.10

— Percentage of material dredged by private firms: 82.2%

    Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
    ×
    • — Companies dredging for Corps: 51 (33 small businesses) submitted 363 bids for 183 contracts (87 of which went to small & emerging businesses)
    • — Percentage of dredging funds going to contractors: 89.2%

    — Corps-owned dredges: 11 (4 hopper, 7 other)

    13. FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT

    — Dams managed by Corps: 692, at 557 dam projects

    — Federal levees built or controlled by Corps: ~11,750 miles

    — Damages prevented by Corps projects, 2009: $29.5 billion

    — Average annual damages prevented by Corps projects (2000-2009): $22.3 billion

    — Damages prevented per $1 invested (adjusted for inflation), 1928-2009: $7.17

    14. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION/RESTORATION

    — Largest projects ($20M+ in FY10):

    • South Florida Ecosystem Restoration
    • Columbia River Fish & Wildlife Mitigation,
    • Missouri River Fish & Wildlife Mitigation
    • Louisiana Coastal Area Ecosystem Restoration (investigation)
    • Upper Mississippi River Restoration

    15. REGULATORY PROGRAM

    — Final Actions, FY10: 68,800

    • — Standard Permits and Letters of Permission: 3,700
    • — Activities covered by Regional General Permits: 13,470
    • — Covered by Programmatic General Permits: 6,900
    • — Covered by Nationwide Permits: 31,900
    • — Permits Denied: 275
    • — Permits Modified: 3,100
    • — Applications Withdrawn: 10,200
    • — “No Permit Required” Determinations: 9,810

    — Percent of minor permits completed within 60 days: 92%

    — Jurisdictional Determinations: 63,100

    — Number of approved mitigation banks: 665

    — Compliance visits done on 17% of mitigation sites and 34% of mitigation banks or In Lieu Fee sites

    16. HYDROPOWER

    — Number of projects in operation: 75, with 350 generating units

    — Installed generating capacity: 23,764 megawatts

    — Largest USACE power plants:

      Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
      ×
      • — Capacity—2,484 megawatts, John Day Dam, Columbia River, OR;
      • — Most units: 27, Chief Joseph Dam, Columbia River, WA
      • — Largest generating unit: 220 megawatts, Dworshak Dam, North Fork Clearwater River, ID

      — Annual power generation: 68 billion kilowatt-hours

      — Annual gross revenue generated: approx. $4 billion

      — Repayment to U.S. Treasury from power sales (estimate): $800 million

      — Value of Hydropower Assets (2007): approx. $20 billion

      — Rank among U.S. hydropower producers: #1

      — USACE owns & operates 24% of U.S. hydropower capacity, or 3% of total U.S. electric capacity

      — FERC licensed non-federal power plants at Corps facilities (not counted above): 90, with 2,300 megawatts capacity

      17. RECREATION

      — Rank among Federal providers of Outdoor Recreation: #1

      — Visits per year: 370 million

      10% of U.S. population visits a Corps project at least once each year

      — Number of sites: 4,254 at 422 Corps projects (mostly lakes)

      • more than 90% of the lakes are near metropolitan areas (within 50 miles of a MSA)

      — Land & water used for recreation: 12 million acres

      • — USACE hosts 20% of visits to Federal recreation areas on 2% of Federal lands

      — Miles of shoreline: 54,879

      — Number of campsites: 92,674

      — Miles of trails: 6,864

      — Number of boat launch ramps: 3,603

      — Share of all U.S. freshwater lake fishing: 33%

      • 20,000 fishing tournaments a year

      — Spent by visitors at Corps projects: $18 billion

      • — Jobs (full or part time) supported by visitation: 350,000

      — Concessionaires on Corps projects: 500, with gross fixed assets of $1 billion

      — Volunteers at Corps projects: 54,917; Hours worked: 1.4 million, Value of their labor: $28.3 million

      18. WATER SUPPLY

      — Total capacity of Corps lakes: 329.2 million acre-feet

      — Total authorized municipal & industrial water supply storage: 9.76 million acre-feet

      Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
      ×

      — Total investment associated with municipal & industrial water supply storage: $1.5 billion

      — Projects with authorized municipal & industrial water supply storage: 136, in 25 States plus Puerto Rico

      — Projects with authorized irrigation storage: 48

      19. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS

      — Major disasters responded to in 2010: 20

      • — Largest events: Hurricane Earl; Flooding in Nashville, Midwest, Arizona and California; Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Haiti Earthquake.

      — Corps members deployed to emergency operations: 855

      20. SUPPORT TO OTHER (NON-DEFENSE) GOVERNMENT AGENCIES:

      — Number of Federal agencies supported: 70+

      — Expenditures for FY10: $2 billion

      — Biggest Customers:

      • — Dept. of State, $ 630 million
      • — Dept. of Veterans Affairs, $348.7 million
      • — Environmental Protection Agency, $308.2 million
      • — Dept. of Homeland Security – Customs and Border Protection, $254.2 million
      Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
      ×
      Page 29
      Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
      ×
      Page 30
      Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
      ×
      Page 31
      Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
      ×
      Page 32
      Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
      ×
      Page 33
      Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Statistics." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
      ×
      Page 34
      Next: Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning »
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      The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) is responsible for construction, operations, and maintenance of much of the nation's water resources infrastructure. This infrastructure includes flood control levees, multi-purpose dams, locks, navigation channels, port and harbor facilities, and beach protection infrastructure. The Corps of Engineers also regulates the dredging and filling of wetlands subject to federal jurisdictions. Along with its programs for flood damage reduction and support of commercial navigation, ecosystem restoration was added as a primary Corps mission area in 1996.

      The National Research Council (NRC) Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Water Resources Science, Engineering, and Planning was convened by the NRC at the request of the Corps of Engineers to provide independent advice to the Corps on an array of strategic and planning issues. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers surveys the key water resources challenges facing the Corps, the limits of what might be expected today from the Corps, and future prospects for the agency. This report presents several findings, but no recommendations, to the Corps of Engineers based on initial investigations and discussions with Corps leadership.

      National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers can serve as a foundational resource for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Congress, federal agencies, and Corps project co-sponsors, among others.

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