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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Examples of Other Networks or Train-the-Trainers Programs." National Research Council. 2011. Research in the Life Sciences with Dual Use Potential: An International Faculty Development Project on Education About the Responsible Conduct of Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13270.
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Appendix E
Examples of Other Networks or Train-the-Trainers Programs
13

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION

In 2009 the World Health Organization revamped its Biorisk Management Advanced Training Course to align with a new focus that encompasses both biosafety and laboratory biosecurity (WHO 2006). The new program reflects concepts based on the latest science and theory behind accelerated and adult learning. This highly interactive workshop builds the knowledge and skills of individuals who train and educate others in the biorisk management community. The workshop is intended to increase the number of qualified trainers able to support biorisk management globally (WHO 2010).

Participants in the workshop are expected to have some prior teaching/training experience and to be prepared to carry out at least two training sessions a year in their regions or countries. The first seminar was held in Amman, Jordan, in April 2010, and five more throughout 2010 covered all six of the WHO regions.

BRADFORD DISARMAMENT RESEARCH CENTRE

Another approach to faculty development has been created by the staff of the Disarmament Research Centre of the University of Bradford as part of a broader project on “Dual Use Bioethics.”14 This train-the-trainer program takes advantage of distance learning techniques and advanced videoconferencing capabilities at the university take relatively small groups of faculty through a series of lectures as well as a set of interactive scenarios designed to explore ethical dilemmas related to dual use research.

Working in a fully supported online learning community, participants will be able to communicate and interact with peers, developing their practice through sustained reflection and participation in a range of activities and scenarios. Participants

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13 The contents of this appendix are largely excerpted from NRC 2010.

14 An overview of the larger project may be found at its website: http://www.dual-usebioethics.net/.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Examples of Other Networks or Train-the-Trainers Programs." National Research Council. 2011. Research in the Life Sciences with Dual Use Potential: An International Faculty Development Project on Education About the Responsible Conduct of Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13270.
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will be encouraged to bring their own personal ideas and experiences to the course, sharing these with peers in order to contextualise their knowledge and understanding in ways that will help them meet the ethical challenges thrown up by dual-use (Bradford Disarmament Research Centre website 2011).

The program will begin its third cycle in Fall 2011, and has added a shorter course.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Examples of Other Networks or Train-the-Trainers Programs." National Research Council. 2011. Research in the Life Sciences with Dual Use Potential: An International Faculty Development Project on Education About the Responsible Conduct of Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13270.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Examples of Other Networks or Train-the-Trainers Programs." National Research Council. 2011. Research in the Life Sciences with Dual Use Potential: An International Faculty Development Project on Education About the Responsible Conduct of Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13270.
×
Page 40
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Examples of Other Networks or Train-the-Trainers Programs." National Research Council. 2011. Research in the Life Sciences with Dual Use Potential: An International Faculty Development Project on Education About the Responsible Conduct of Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13270.
×
Page 41
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Examples of Other Networks or Train-the-Trainers Programs." National Research Council. 2011. Research in the Life Sciences with Dual Use Potential: An International Faculty Development Project on Education About the Responsible Conduct of Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13270.
×
Page 42
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In many countries, colleges and universities are where the majority of innovative research is done; in all cases, they are where future scientists receive both their initial training and their initial introduction to the norms of scientific conduct regardless of their eventual career paths. Thus, institutions of higher education are particularly relevant to the tasks of education on research with dual use potential, whether for faculty, postdoctoral researchers, graduate and undergraduate students, or technical staff.

Research in the Life Sciences with Dual Use Potential describes the outcomes of the planning meeting for a two-year project to develop a network of faculty who will be able to teach the challenges of research in the life sciences with dual use potential. Faculty will be able to incorporate such concepts into their teaching and research through exposure to the tenets of responsible conduct of research in active learning teaching methods. This report is intended to provide guidelines for that effort and to be applicable to any country wishing to adopt this educational model that combines principles of active learning and training with attention to norms of responsible science. The potential audiences include a broad array of current and future scientists and the policymakers who develop laws and regulations around issues of dual use.

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