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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Participants." National Research Council. 2012. U.S. and International Perspectives on Global Science Policy and Science Diplomacy: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13300.
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Appendix B


Workshop Participants

Azamat Abdymomunov

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Office of the Prime Minister, Kazakhstan

Munirul Alam

International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh

Mohamed Behnassi

Faculty of Law, Economics, and Social Science

Ibn Zohr University, Agadir, Morocco

Eric Bone

Office of Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary of State

U.S. Department of State

John P. Boright

U.S. National Academy of Sciences

Thomas Casadevall

U.S. Geological Survey

Hernan Chaimovich

Butantan Foundation, Brazil

C. I. (Jim) Chang

Army Research Laboratory

U.S. Department of Defense

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Participants." National Research Council. 2012. U.S. and International Perspectives on Global Science Policy and Science Diplomacy: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13300.
×

Michael T. Clegg

U.S. National Academy of Sciences

Corey A. Cohn

Office of Science

U.S. Department of Energy

Rita R. Colwell

Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

University of Maryland

Gebisa Ejeta

Department of Agronomy

Purdue University

Mohamed M. El-Faham

Center for Special Studies and Programs

The Library of Alexandria, Egypt

Susan C. Gardner

Office of Science and Technology Cooperation

U.S. Department of State

Cutberto Garza

Boston College

Daniel L. Goroff

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

David A. Hamburg

Carnegie Corporation of New York

American Association for the Advancement of Science

James E. Herrington

Fogarty International Center

National Institutes of Health

Shafiqul Islam

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Tufts University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Participants." National Research Council. 2012. U.S. and International Perspectives on Global Science Policy and Science Diplomacy: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13300.
×

Judith Kimble

Department of Biochemistry

University of Wisconsin–Madison

Celia Merzbacher

Innovative Partnerships

Semiconductor Research Corporation

Khotso Mokhele

Impala Platinum Holdings Ltd. and Adcock Ingram Holdings Ltd., South Africa

C. D. (Dan) Mote Jr.

Department of Mechanical Engineering

University of Maryland

Romain Murenzi

American Association for the Advancement of Science

Cherry A. Murray

School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Harvard University

Elizabeth O’Malley

Office of Science

U.S. Department of Energy

Norman D. Neureiter

Center for Science Diplomacy and Center for Science, Technology, and Security Policy

American Association for the Advancement of Science

Jason Rao

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

Marvadeen Singh-Wilmot

Department of Chemistry

University of the West Indies, Jamaica

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Participants." National Research Council. 2012. U.S. and International Perspectives on Global Science Policy and Science Diplomacy: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13300.
×

Karen Strier

Department of Anthropology

University of Wisconsin–Madison

Volker ter Meulen

German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina

University of Würzburg

Vaughan Turekian

International Office

American Association for the Advancement of Science

James M. Turner

Office of International Affairs

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Charles M. Vest

U.S. National Academy of Engineering

John C. Wall

Cummins Inc.

Doron Weber

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Larry H. Weber

Office of International Science and Engineering

National Science Foundation

Lama Youssef

Ministry of Higher Education, Syria

Abdul Hamid Zakri

Office of the Prime Minister, Malaysia

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Participants." National Research Council. 2012. U.S. and International Perspectives on Global Science Policy and Science Diplomacy: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13300.
×
Page 47
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Participants." National Research Council. 2012. U.S. and International Perspectives on Global Science Policy and Science Diplomacy: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13300.
×
Page 48
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Participants." National Research Council. 2012. U.S. and International Perspectives on Global Science Policy and Science Diplomacy: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13300.
×
Page 49
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Participants." National Research Council. 2012. U.S. and International Perspectives on Global Science Policy and Science Diplomacy: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13300.
×
Page 50
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The United States and other countries around the world face problems of an increasingly global nature that often require major contributions from science and engineering that one nation alone cannot provide. The advance of science and engineering is an increasingly global enterprise, and in many areas there is a natural commonality of interest among practitioners from diverse cultures. In response to challenges, the National Academies held a workshop in Washington, DC, in February 2011, to assess effective ways to meet international challenges through sound science policy and science diplomacy.

U.S. and International Perspectives on Global Science Policy and Science Diplomacy summarizes issues addressed during this workshop. Participants discussed many of the characteristics of science, such as its common language and methods; the open, self-correcting nature of research; the universality of the most important questions; and its respect for evidence. These common aspects not only make science inherently international but also give science special capacities in advancing communication and cooperation. Many workshop participants pointed out that, while advancing global science and science diplomacy are distinct, they are complementary, and making them each more effective often involves similar measures. Some participants suggested it may sometimes be more accurate to use the term global science cooperation rather than science diplomacy. Other participants indicated that science diplomacy is, in many situations, a clear and useful concept, recounting remarkable historical cases of the effective use of international scientific cooperation in building positive governmental relationships and dealing with sensitive and urgent problems.

To gain U.S. and international perspectives on these issues, representatives from Brazil, Bangladesh, Egypt, Germany, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Morocco, Rwanda, South Africa, and Syria attended the workshop, as well as two of the most recently named U.S. science envoys, Rita Colwell and Gebisa Ejeta.

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