National Academies Press: OpenBook

Challenges in Characterizing Small Particles: Exploring Particles from the Nano- to Microscale: A Workshop Summary (2012)

Chapter: E Origin of and Information on the Chemical Sciences Roundtable

« Previous: D Workshop Attendees
Suggested Citation:"E Origin of and Information on the Chemical Sciences Roundtable." National Research Council. 2012. Challenges in Characterizing Small Particles: Exploring Particles from the Nano- to Microscale: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13317.
×

E

Origin of and Information on the Chemical Sciences Roundtable

In April 1994 the American Chemical Society (ACS) held an Interactive Presidential Colloquium titled “Shaping the Future: The Chemical Research Environment in the Next Century.”1 The report from this colloquium identified several objectives, including the need to ensure communication on key issues among government, industry, and university representatives. The rapidly changing environment in the United States for science and technology has created a number of stresses on the chemical enterprise. The stresses are particularly important with regard to the chemical industry, which is a major segment of U.S. industry, in terms of trade and employment opportunities for a technical workforce. A neutral and credible forum for communication among all segments of the enterprise could enhance the future well-being of chemical science and technology.

After the report was issued, a formal request for such a roundtable activity was transmitted to Dr. Bruce M. Alberts, chairman of the National Research Council (NRC), by the Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives, an informal organization of representatives from the various federal agencies that support chemical research. As part of the NRC, the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology (BCST) can provide an intellectual focus on issues and fundamentals of science and technology across the broad fields of chemistry and chemical engineering. In the winter of 1996 Dr. Alberts asked BCST to establish the Chemical Sciences Roundtable to provide a mechanism for initiating and maintaining the dialogue envisioned in the ACS report.

The mission of the Chemical Sciences Roundtable is to provide a science-oriented, apolitical forum to enhance understanding of the critical issues in chemical science and technology affecting the government, industrial, and academic sectors. To support this mission the Chemical Sciences Roundtable will do the following:

  • Identify topics of importance to the chemical science and technology community by holding periodic discussions and presentations, and gathering input from the broadest possible set of constituencies involved in chemical science and technology.
  • Organize workshops and symposiums and publish reports on topics important to the continuing health and advancement of chemical science and technology.
  • Disseminate information and knowledge gained in the workshops and reports to the chemical science and technology community through discussions with, presentations to, and engagement of other forums and organizations.
  • Bring topics deserving further in-depth study to the attention of the NRC’s Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. The roundtable itself will not attempt to resolve the issues and problems that it identifies—it will make no recommendations or provide any specific guidance. Rather, the goal of the roundtable is to ensure a full and meaningful discussion of the identified topics so that the participants in the workshops and the community as a whole can determine the best courses of action.

_________________________

1 American Chemical Society. 1994. Shaping the Future: The Chemical Research Environment in the Next Century. Report from the Interactive Presidential Colloquium, April 7-9, Washington, D.C.

Suggested Citation:"E Origin of and Information on the Chemical Sciences Roundtable." National Research Council. 2012. Challenges in Characterizing Small Particles: Exploring Particles from the Nano- to Microscale: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13317.
×

This page is Blank

Suggested Citation:"E Origin of and Information on the Chemical Sciences Roundtable." National Research Council. 2012. Challenges in Characterizing Small Particles: Exploring Particles from the Nano- to Microscale: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13317.
×
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"E Origin of and Information on the Chemical Sciences Roundtable." National Research Council. 2012. Challenges in Characterizing Small Particles: Exploring Particles from the Nano- to Microscale: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13317.
×
Page 82
Next: F References »
Challenges in Characterizing Small Particles: Exploring Particles from the Nano- to Microscale: A Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $42.00 Buy Ebook | $33.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Small particles are ubiquitous in the natural and built worlds and have tremendous impact throughout. However, a lack of understanding about the properties and chemical composition of small particles limits our ability to predict, and control their applications and impacts.

Challenges in Characterizing Small Particles: Exploring Particles from the Nano- to Microscales summarizes presentations and discussions at a 2010 National Academies roundtable. Speakers at this roundtable discussed the crucial types of information that need to be determined about small particles in different media. They also explored the critical importance of small particles in environmental science, materials and chemical sciences, biological science, and engineering, and the many challenges involved in characterizing materials at the nano- and microscales. The discussions on characterization included static, dynamic, experimental, computational, and theoretical characterization. The workshop also included several "research tool" presentations that highlighted new advances in characterizing small particles.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!