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Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community: Workshop Summary (2012)

Chapter: Appendix D: Abbreviations and Acronyms

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Abbreviations and Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13344.
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D

Abbreviations and Acronyms

ACO Accountable Care Organization
ADLs activities of daily living
AI Adequate Intake
AoA Administration on Aging

BMI body mass index

CACFP Child and Adult Care Food Program
CBO community-based organization
CCTP Community Based Care Transition Program
CDSMP Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, Stanford University
CFSM Core Food Security Module
CMS Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
CN congregate nutrition services
CPS Current Population Survey
CSFP Commodity Supplemental Food Program
CTI Care Transitions Intervention®

DASH Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension
DGA Dietary Guidelines for Americans
DGAC Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee
DOT Department of Transportation
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Abbreviations and Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13344.
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DPP Diabetes Prevention Program
DRI Dietary Reference Intake

EAR Estimated Average Requirement

FMS financial management services
FNB Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine, The National Academies
FY fiscal year

GAO Government Accountability Office

HDN home-delivered nutrition services
HHS Department of Health and Human Services
HUP Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania

IOM Institute of Medicine, The National Academies

MNT medical nutrition therapy
MOWAA Meals On Wheels Association of America

NH nursing home
NHANES National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
NIA National Institute on Aging
NIH National Institutes of Health

OAA Older Americans Act

P.L. public law

QALY quality-adjusted life year
QIO Quality Improvement Organization

RD registered dietitian
RDA Recommended Daily Allowance

SNAP Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
SOW statement of work

TEFAP The Emergency Food Assistance Program

USDA U.S. Department of Agriculture

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Abbreviations and Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13344.
×
VA Veterans Administration
VD-HCBS Veterans Directed Home- and Community-Based Services
VHA Veterans Health Administration

WIC Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Abbreviations and Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13344.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Abbreviations and Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13344.
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Page 139
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Abbreviations and Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13344.
×
Page 140
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Abbreviations and Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13344.
×
Page 141
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Abbreviations and Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13344.
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Page 142
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The U.S. population of older adults is predicted to grow rapidly as "baby boomers" (those born between 1946 and 1964) begin to reach 65 years of age. Simultaneously, advancements in medical care and improved awareness of healthy lifestyles have led to longer life expectancies. The Census Bureau projects that the population of Americans 65 years of age and older will rise from approximately 40 million in 2010 to 55 million in 2020, a 36 percent increase. Furthermore, older adults are choosing to live independently in the community setting rather than residing in an institutional environment. Furthermore, the types of services needed by this population are shifting due to changes in their health issues. Older adults have historically been viewed as underweight and frail; however, over the past decade there has been an increase in the number of obese older persons. Obesity in older adults is not only associated with medical comorbidities such as diabetes; it is also a major risk factor for functional decline and homebound status. The baby boomers have a greater prevalence of obesity than any of their historic counterparts, and projections forecast an aging population with even greater chronic disease burden and disability.

In light of the increasing numbers of older adults choosing to live independently rather than in nursing homes, and the important role nutrition can play in healthy aging, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened a public workshop to illuminate issues related to community-based delivery of nutrition services for older adults and to identify nutrition interventions and model programs.

Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community summarizes the presentations and discussions prepared from the workshop transcript and slides. This report examines nutrition-related issues of concern experienced by older adults in the community including nutrition screening, food insecurity, sarcopenic obesity, dietary patterns for older adults, and economic issues. This report explores transitional care as individuals move from acute, subacute, or chronic care settings to the community, and provides models of transitional care in the community. This report also provides examples of successful intervention models in the community setting, and covers the discussion of research gaps in knowledge about nutrition interventions and services for older adults in the community.

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