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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Glossary." National Research Council. 2012. Effective Tracking of Building Energy Use: Improving the Commercial Buildings and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13360.
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Appendix G

Glossary

area probability sample a sample generated by dividing a geographic
area into a number of smaller areas and then
sampling from a subset of these areas
coverage error bias resulting from the omission of units from
the sampling frame
end use a specific activity that requires energy (for example,
space heating or refrigeration)
Energy Star certification a joint program of the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency and the U.S. Department
of Energy that certifies energy-efficient products
geocoding the process of appending geographic identifiers
(codes or coordinates) to an address
hot deck imputation a method for handling missing data by filling in
a missing value with a response from another
case within the same data set
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Glossary." National Research Council. 2012. Effective Tracking of Building Energy Use: Improving the Commercial Buildings and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13360.
×
LEED certification a building certification system providing
verification that a building was designed and
built according to a set of “green” standards
list sample a sample generated from a sampling frame that
exists in a list form (such as a list of housing
unit addresses)
multistage sampling a sampling process involving several stages,
in which units at each subsequent stage (for
example, households) are subsampled from
previously selected larger units (for example,
city blocks or neighborhoods)
sampling frame the set of units from which the sample is
selected
sampling units the individual units selected from the sampling
frame
show card an interviewing aid consisting of a paper version
of answer options or definitions associated
with questionnaire items and used during an
in-person interview when the questions are read to the respondent and may be too difficult
to understand or remember without a
visual aid (also referred to as hand cards or flash cards)
smart meter electric meter that transmits electricity consumption
data to the utility and typically enables
a consumer to see a detailed breakdown
of the electricity usage information collected
by the meter
stratified sample a sampling technique that involves dividing
the sampling frame into distinct subgroups
of similar units and then selecting a separate
sample from each of the subgroups
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Glossary." National Research Council. 2012. Effective Tracking of Building Energy Use: Improving the Commercial Buildings and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13360.
×
Page 123
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Glossary." National Research Council. 2012. Effective Tracking of Building Energy Use: Improving the Commercial Buildings and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13360.
×
Page 124
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The United States is responsible for nearly one-fifth of the world's energy consumption. Population growth, and the associated growth in housing, commercial floor space, transportation, goods, and services is expected to cause a 0.7 percent annual increase in energy demand for the foreseeable future. The energy used by the commercial and residential sectors represents approximately 40 percent of the nation's total energy consumption, and the share of these two sectors is expected to increase in the future.

The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) are two major surveys conducted by the Energy Information Administration. The surveys are the most relevant sources of data available to researchers and policy makers on energy consumption in the commercial and residential sectors. Many of the design decisions and operational procedures for the CBECS and RECS were developed in the 1970s and 1980s, and resource limitations during much of the time since then have prevented EIA from making significant changes to the data collections. Effective Tracking of Building Energy Use makes recommendations for redesigning the surveys based on a review of evolving data user needs and an assessment of new developments in relevant survey methods.

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