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Deterrence and the Death Penalty (2012)

Chapter: Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2012. Deterrence and the Death Penalty. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13363.
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Appendix


Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Daniel S. Nagin (Chair) is Teresa and H. John Heinz III university professor of public policy and statistics in the Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses on the evolution of criminal and antisocial behaviors over the life course, the deterrent effect of criminal and noncriminal penalties on illegal behaviors, and the development of statistical methods for analyzing longitudinal data. His work has appeared in such diverse outlets as the American Economic Review, the American Sociological Review, the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Archives of General Psychiatry, Psychological Methodology, Law & Society Review, and Stanford Law Review. He is an elected fellow of the American Society of Criminology and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and he was the 2006 recipient of the American Society of Criminology’s Edwin H. Sutherland Award. He holds a Ph.D. from the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University.

Kerwin K. Charles is the Edwin and Betty L. Bergman distinguished service professor in the Harris School of public policy studies at the University of Chicago and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on a range of subjects in the broad area of applied microeconomics, including how mandated minimum marriage ages affects young people’s marriage and migration behavior; the effect of racial composition of neighborhoods on the social connections people make; differences in visible consumption across racial and ethnic groups; the effect of retirement on subjective well-being; and the propagation of wealth across generations within a family. His recent work has studied the degree

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2012. Deterrence and the Death Penalty. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13363.
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to which prejudice can account for wages and employment differences by race and gender. He has a Ph.D. from Cornell University.

Philip J. Cook is the ITT/Sanford professor of public policy and professor of economics and sociology at Duke University. Previously, he served as director and chair of Duke’s Sanford Institute of Public Policy, and he has been a visiting scholar at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He has served as a consultant to the U.S. Department of Justice (Criminal Division) and the U.S. Department of the Treasury (Enforcement Division). He has published on a wide range of topics, including punishment, deterrence of crime, the costs of crime, homicide and economic conditions, and the epidemic in youth violence of the late 1980s and early 1990s. His other research interests include evaluation methods; public health policy; and the regulation of alcohol, guns, and gambling. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California at Berkeley.

Steven N. Durlauf is the Kenneth J. Arrow and Laurents R. Christensen professor of economics at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Previously, he served as director of the economics program at the Santa Fe Institute and as general editor of the revised edition of the New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics. His primary research interests involve the integration of the social influences into the theoretical and statistical analysis of economic phenomena, and he has also studied issues related to racial profiling, deterrence and imprisonment, and deterrence and death penalty. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University.

Amelia M. Haviland holds the Anna Loomis McCandless chair at the Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University, and she is a senior statistician at RAND. Her research focuses on causal analysis with observational data and analysis of longitudinal and complex survey data with applications in health, criminology, and economics. Her methodological work has included new methods to combine semi-parametric mixture modeling for longitudinal data with propensity score approaches to causal modeling and methods for creating minimum mean squared error composite estimates from a combination of probability and nonprobability samples. She is a recipient of the Thomas Lord Scholarship Award from the RAND Institute for Civil Justice. She holds a Ph.D. in statistics and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

Gerard E. Lynch is a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and he is the Paul J. Kellner professor of law at the Columbia University School of Law. Previously, he served on the U.S. District Court for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2012. Deterrence and the Death Penalty. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13363.
×

the Southern District of New York. Prior to his appointment to the bench, he served as vice dean of the Columbia University School of Law. His main areas of expertise include sentencing and criminal law and procedure. He is a recipient of the Edward Weinfeld Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Administration of Justice from the New York County Lawyers’ Association and of the Wien Prize for Social Responsibility from Columbia University. He holds degrees from Columbia College and the Columbia University School of Law.

Charles F. Manski is a Board of Trustees professor in economics at Northwestern University. Previously, he served on the faculties of the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and Carnegie Mellon University. His research spans econometrics, judgment and decision, and the analysis of social policy. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and an elected fellow of the Econometric Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He holds a B.S. and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

John V. Pepper is associate professor of economics at the University of Virginia. His research focuses on program evaluation methods, applied econometrics, and public economics. He has published widely on a range of topics, including evaluation of criminal justice data and programs, food assistance programs, health and disability programs, and welfare programs. He is on the board of the Michigan Retirement Research Center and of the Southern Economics Association. He is a coeditor of the Southern Economic Journal, and he served as a guest editor for a special issue of the American Journal of Law and Economics, which focused on empirical research on the death penalty. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

James Q. Wilson was the Reagan professor of public policy at Pepperdine University and a distinguished scholar in the Department of Political Science and senior fellow at the Clough Center at Boston College. Previously, he was the Shattuck professor of government at Harvard University and the James Collins professor of management and public policy at the University of California at Los Angeles. His national positions related to issues of public policy included chair of the White House Task Force on Crime, chair of the National Advisory Commission on Drug Abuse Prevention, member of the Attorney General’s Task Force on Violent Crime, member of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board, and member of the board of directors of the Police Foundation. He held a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2012. Deterrence and the Death Penalty. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13363.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2012. Deterrence and the Death Penalty. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13363.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2012. Deterrence and the Death Penalty. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13363.
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Page 126
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2012. Deterrence and the Death Penalty. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13363.
×
Page 127
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2012. Deterrence and the Death Penalty. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13363.
×
Page 128
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Many studies during the past few decades have sought to determine whether the death penalty has any deterrent effect on homicide rates. Researchers have reached widely varying, even contradictory, conclusions. Some studies have concluded that the threat of capital punishment deters murders, saving large numbers of lives; other studies have concluded that executions actually increase homicides; still others, that executions have no effect on murder rates. Commentary among researchers, advocates, and policymakers on the scientific validity of the findings has sometimes been acrimonious.

Against this backdrop, the National Research Council report Deterrence and the Death Penalty assesses whether the available evidence provides a scientific basis for answering questions of if and how the death penalty affects homicide rates. This new report from the Committee on Law and Justice concludes that research to date on the effect of capital punishment on homicide rates is not useful in determining whether the death penalty increases, decreases, or has no effect on these rates. The key question is whether capital punishment is less or more effective as a deterrent than alternative punishments, such as a life sentence without the possibility of parole. Yet none of the research that has been done accounted for the possible effect of noncapital punishments on homicide rates. The report recommends new avenues of research that may provide broader insight into any deterrent effects from both capital and noncapital punishments.

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