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Fairness in Employment Testing: Validity Generalization, Minority Issues, and the General Aptitude Test Battery (1989)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches, Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches, Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1989. Fairness in Employment Testing: Validity Generalization, Minority Issues, and the General Aptitude Test Battery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1338.
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Page 329
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches, Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1989. Fairness in Employment Testing: Validity Generalization, Minority Issues, and the General Aptitude Test Battery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1338.
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Page 330
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches, Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1989. Fairness in Employment Testing: Validity Generalization, Minority Issues, and the General Aptitude Test Battery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1338.
×
Page 331
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches, Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1989. Fairness in Employment Testing: Validity Generalization, Minority Issues, and the General Aptitude Test Battery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1338.
×
Page 332
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches, Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1989. Fairness in Employment Testing: Validity Generalization, Minority Issues, and the General Aptitude Test Battery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1338.
×
Page 333
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches, Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1989. Fairness in Employment Testing: Validity Generalization, Minority Issues, and the General Aptitude Test Battery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1338.
×
Page 334

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CBiographical Sketches JOHN A. HARTIGAN (Chair) is the Eugene Higgins professor of statis- tics and director of the Statistical Computing Laboratory at Yale Univer- sity. His teaching and research interests center on the foundations of probability and statistics, Bayes theory, classification, statistical comput- ing, and graphical methods. He is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute and the Royal Statistical Society. He received BSc and MSc degrees in mathematics from the University of Sydney and a PhD degree in mathematical statistics from Princeton University. LORRIE A. SHEPARD (Vice Chair) is professor and chair of research and evaluation methodology in the School of Education at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She is past president of the National Council on Measurement in Education and past editor of both the Journal of Educational Measurement and the American Educational Research Jour- nal. Her research includes applied psychometric studies, aimed at topics such as standard setting and bias detection, and policy studies addressing issues of test use. She received a BA degree in history from Pomona College and an MA degree in counseling and a PhD degree in educational research from the University of Colorado. MARCUS ALEXIS is dean of the College of Business Administration at the University of Illinois, Chicago. An expert on decision making, marketing, and the economic role of minorities, he has taught at Macal 329

330 APPENDIX C ester College, De Paul University, the University of Rochester, and Northwestern University and has been a Ford Foundation faculty study fellow at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- ogy. He was a commissioner of the Interstate Commerce Commission from 1979 to 1981. He is currently deputy chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, a trustee of the Teachers Insurance & Annuity Association (TIAA), and a member of the board of directors of the Metropolitan Planning Council for the City of Chicago. He is a member of the board of governors of the Beta Gamma Sigma society, a member of the American Economic Association, the National Economic Associa- tion, and the Econometric Society, and a past member of the board of the Caucus of Black Economists. He is on the editorial board of the Review of Black Political Economy and has served on the board of economists of Black Enterprise. He received AB and honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degrees from Brooklyn College, an MA degree from Michigan State University, and a PhD degree in economics from the University of Minnesota. MANFRED EMMRICH is director of the North Carolina State Employ- ment Service Division of the Employment Security Commission of North Carolina, responsible for the operation of employment services provided by 84 local Job Service centers and branch offices across the state. From 1978 to 1985, Emmrich served as a senior associate with MDC, Inc., a nonprofit research and development group with special interests in productivity and employment and training issues. Emmrich was chair of the Employment Security Commission of North Carolina from 1973 to 1978, responsible for the state's employment service, unemployment insurance, and labor market information programs. From 1962 to 1973, Emmrich held various management and executive positions in the Macke Company. Prior to entering the private sector, Emmrich served in the U.S. Army as an officer in Army Intelligence and Security. A former president of the Interstate Conference of Employment Security Agencies, Inc., Emmrich currently serves on that organization's Employment and Training Committee. Emmrich has a BA degree in economics from Davidson College. LARRY V. HEDGES is chairman of the Measurement Evaluation and Statistical Analysis Program and of the Department of Education at the University of Chicago. His research is concerned with statistical methods for combining evidence from replicated research studies, statistical mod- els in cognitive psychology, and the social psychology of scientific research. He is the coauthor (with Ingram Olkin) of Statistical Methods for Meta-Analysis and is the associate editor of the Journal of Educa- tional Statistics and Psychological Bulletin. He received a BA degree

APPENDIC C 33) from the University of California, San Diego, and MS and PhD degrees from Stanford University, all in statistics. IRA J. HIRSH is Edward Mallinckrodt distinguished university professor of psychology and audiology at Washington University, where he has also been chair of the Department of Psychology and dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. His research on speech, hearing, and deafness has been carried out at the Central Institute for the Deaf, where he was formerly director of research and is currently senior research scientist. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America (past president), the American Psycholog- ical Association, and the American Speech and Hearing Association. From 1982 to 1987 he was chair of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education of the National Research Council. He has an AB degree from the New York State College for Teachers at Albany, an MA degree from Northwestern University, and a PhD degree in experimental psychology from Harvard University. RICHARD M. JAEGER is professor of education and director of the Center for Educational Research and Evaluation at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. His research is concerned with educational measurement and applied statistics. He is coeditor of Minimum Compe- tency Achievement Testing (1980), author of Statistics: A Spectator Sport (1983) and Sampling in Education and the Social Sciences (1984), and editor of Complementary Methods for Research in Education (19871. He is past editor of the Journal of Educational Measurement and is on the editorial boards of several journals. He is past president of the National Council on Measurement in Education and a member of the American Statistical Association, the American Educational Research Association, and the American Evaluation Association. He received a BA degree in mathematics from Pepperdine College and MS and PhD degrees in mathematical statistics and educational research methodology, respec- tively, from Stanford University. STEPHEN P. KLEIN is a senior research scientist with the RAND Corporation where he directs policy research studies in the fields of education, health, and criminal justice. He also serves as a consultant to several professional licensing boards on matters relating to testing. He is a member of the American Psychological Association, the American Educational Research Association, and the National Council on Measure- ment in Education. He received a BS degree from Tufts University and MS and PhD degrees in industrial psychology from Purdue University. ROBERT L. LINN is professor of education at the University of Colo- rado, Boulder. His research is directed at applied and theoretical prob

332 APPENDIX C lems in educational and psychological measurement. He is a former president of the Division of Evaluation, Measurement, and Statistics of the American Psychological Association, former president of the National Council on Measurement in Education, and former vice president of the American Educational Research Association for the Division of Measure- ment and Research Methodology. He has served as editor of the Journal of Educational Measurement and was vice chair of the committee that developed the 1985 Standards for Educational and Psychological Test- ing. He received an AB degree in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and an MA degree in psychology and a PhD degree in psychological measurement from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. JOHN M. RAUSCHENBERGER is a personnel research consultant in the Workforce Research and Selection Systems Section of the Employee Development Office at the Ford Motor Company. He is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the Academy of Management, and the Equal Employment Advisory Council's Subcommittee on Employee Selection Procedures. He serves as a special reviewer for the Journal of Appliecl Psychology and is on the editorial board of Personnel Psychology journal. He received a BS degree in psychology and MA and PhD degrees in industrial psychology, all from Michigan State University. MICHAEL ROTHSCHILD is professor of economics and dean of social sciences, University of California, San Diego. His research concerns the economics of information, financial economics, law and economics, and industrial organization. He is a member and fellow of the Econometric Society and a member of the American Economic Association. He received a BA degree from Reed College, an MA degree from Yale University, and a PhD degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. PAUL R. SACKETT is associate professor at the Industrial Relations Center of the University of Minnesota. He was previously associate professor of psychology at the University of Illinois, Chicago, and on the faculty of the School of Business at the University of Kansas. He has published extensively in the areas of assessment of managerial potential, job analysis, honesty in the workplace, and psychometric issues in employee selection. He is coauthor (with George F. Dreher) of Perspec- tives on Employee Stapling and Selection (1983), editor of Personnel Psychology, and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Applied Psychology. He received a PhD degree in psychology from the Ohio State University.

APPENDIC C 333 O. PETER SHERWOOD iS solicitor general of New York State. A litigator, he has tried cases and argued appeals in many state and federal courts, including several cases involving challenges to employment testing practices under Title VII. Before joining the Office of the New York Attorney General, he was an assistant counsel at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc., where his practice was focused on fair employment practices litigation. Until 1987 he was an adjunct assistant professor of law at the New York University School of Law, where he taught constitutional law and fair employment practices law. He received a BA degree from Brooklyn College of the City University of New York and a ID degree from New York University School of Law. HOWARD F. TAYLOR iS professor of sociology at Princeton University. His research interests encompass the methodology of test score herita- bility estimation, social psychology, and race and ethnic relations. His books include The IQ Game: A Methodological Inquiry into the Heredity- Environment Controversy (1980) and Balance in Small Groups (1978~. He is a member of the American Sociological Association, a fellow of the Sociological Research Association, and vice president of the Eastern Sociological Society and has been a member of the editorial boards of several journals. He received a BA degree from Hiram College and MA and PhD degrees in sociology from Yale University. ALEXANDRA K. WIGDOR iS study director of the Committee on the General Aptitude Test Battery and also serves as study director of the Committee on the Performance of Military Personnel. Previously, as study director of the Committee on Ability Testing, she coedited (with Wendell R. Garner) Ability Testing: Uses, Consequences, and Contro- versies (1982~. Trained as an historian, her research interests now include human performance assessment, the legal and social dimensions of psychological testing, and the development of governmental policy on testing and selection. A member of Phi Beta Kappa, she received BA and MA degrees from the University of Missouri and studied further at the Free University of Berlin, the University of Maryland, and the Institute for Historical Research, University of London. HILDA WING, currently a research psychologist with the Federal Aviation Administration, served as research associate for the Committee on the General Aptitude Test Battery and the Committee on the Perfor- mance of Military Personnel. Previously she was with the Psychological Corporation, served as chief of the predictor development team at the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, and was research psychologist at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. Her primary area of expertise is personnel testing. She is a member of the

334 APPENDIX C American Psychological Association and has served as chair of its Committee on Employment and Human Resources, and of its Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessment. She received an AB degree in mathematics from Middlebury College and MA and PhD degrees in experimental psychology from the Johns Hopkins University.

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Declining American competitiveness in world economic markets has renewed interest in employment testing as a way of putting the right workers in the right jobs. A new study of the U.S. Department of Labor's General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB) Referral System sheds light on key questions for America's employers: How well does the GATB predict job success? Are there scientific justifications for adjusting minority test scores? Will increased use of the GATB result in substantial increases in productivity?

Fairness in Employment Testing evaluates both the validity generalization techniques used to justify the use of the GATB across the spectrum of U.S. jobs and the policy of adjusting test scores to promote equal opportunity.

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