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Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine (2013)

Chapter: Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
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Appendix A

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Dr. Alan M. Kelly, Chair
University of Pennsylvania [Emeritus]

Dr. Alan Kelly received his veterinary medical education at Bristol University in England and then came to the University of Pennsylvania on a National Cancer Institute Fellowship to pursue a PhD in Pathology. He joined the faculty in the Department of Pathobiology at the School of Veterinary Medicine in 1968 where he taught pathology and conducted research on neuro-muscular development in the rat and on the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In 1994 Dr. Kelly became dean of the School and served in this office for the ensuing 12 years, retiring in December 2005. During his deanship the School’s appropriation from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania increased from $12 million to $38 million. Dr. Kelly also raised $127 million for construction of the Hill Pavilion, a new teaching and research building at the School. Since retiring from the dean’s office, Dr. Kelly has introduced a course on global health for veterinary students and undergraduate students at the university and has led the PennVet World Award and Student Inspiration Award competitions.

Dr. Sheila W. Allen
University of Georgia

Sheila W. Allen is the Dean of the University of Georgia’s College of Veterinary Medicine. Prior to being appointed dean in 2005, Dr. Allen served as associate dean for academic affairs at the University of Georgia, where she was extensively involved in developing and revising the college’s DVM curriculum to give students more flexibility in focusing on their areas of interest. She also guided the faculty in changing college admissions procedures so applicants can

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
×

be assessed on criteria in addition to academic credentials. Her area of expertise in teaching and research is oncologic and reconstructive surgery and perioperative pain management. She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and has served as an elected member of the organization’s Board of Regents and was on the group’s examination committee. She was chair of the research committee, which awards Surgeon in Training grants and Diplomate Investigator awards, and she also chaired the publications committee, overseeing publication of the group’s journal, Veterinary Surgery. She is also active in the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges, serving on the Board of Directors as well as the Government Affairs and Leadership Committees. Dr. Allen also serves on the Council on Education of the American Veterinary Medical Association, which is the accrediting body for veterinary medical education. She is on the board of directors of the Georgia Veterinary Medical Association. Dr. Allen received her DVM and BA degrees from Cornell University and completed her MS in veterinary clinical pathology and small animal surgical residency at the University of Georgia.

Dr. Val R. Beasley
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign [Emeritus]

Val R. Beasley is a professor emeritus of comparative biosciences (veterinary, wildlife and ecological toxicology) in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is also Founder and until recently Executive Director of the Envirovet Program in Wildlife and Ecosystem Health. Envirovet is an international educational program that has provided sixteen highly intensive Summer Institutes. In recent years, the 7-week-long Summer Institute has taken place in multiple locations in the southeastern USA and East Africa. Dr. Beasley was in small animal practice for six years in coastal New Jersey and western Ohio before arriving at the University of Illinois. He helped establish the Animal Poison Control Center there. His research interests have included the pathophysiology and fate in the body of mycotoxins and bluegreen algal toxins, the residues and effects of heavy metal contaminants in marine mammals, the potential of brominated flame retardants to trigger thyroid adenomas and hyperthyroidism in cats; and the causes of mass die-offs in flamingos including potential roles of metals, algal toxins, and infectious agents. In recent years, his research has focused largely on causes of amphibian declines. This has included investigations of the direct and indirect impacts of a wide array of ecological and water quality parameters, infectious agents, and contaminants, including nutrients, endocrine disruptors, pesticides, metals and other trace elements. He is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Toxicology. Dr. Beasley received his DVM from Purdue University and his PhD in toxicology from the University of Illinois.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
×

Dr. Bonnie Buntain
University of Calgary

Bonnie Buntain is the Assistant Dean of Government and International Relations and a Professor of Public Health at the University of Calgary Veterinary Medicine with a joint appointment in the Faculty of Medicine. She is an expert advisor to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Public Health Agency of Canada and the Auditor General of Canada. Prior to joining the faculty in January 2007, Dr. Buntain was the Chief Public Health Veterinarian of the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), United States Department of Agriculture. At the USDA Dr. Buntain advised the Office of Field Operations of all veterinary issues regarding food safety, humane slaughter and handling and optimizing the use, retention and recruitment of public health veterinarians. During her 16 years in public practice, Dr. Buntain has also held other government positions: a scientific reviewer for the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Veterinary Medicine; the National Program Leader for Veterinary Medicine at the USDA’s Extension Service; and the Director of Animal Care at the USDA’s Animal and Plant Inspection Service. In 1995, FSIS selected her to establish and manage their first Animal Production Food Safety staff. In 1999 she was promoted to Assistant Deputy Administrator of FSIS’s Office of Public Health and Science. Dr. Buntain is the President of the Association of Food Safety Veterinarians and Chair of the United States Animal Health Association’s Food and Feed Safety Committee. She was also associated with the University of Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine as an Adjunct Assistant Professor, and served on the Advisory Council for the Center for Corporate and Government Practice. She has received numerous awards for her work. In 2000, Dr. Buntain was awarded “Outstanding Veterinarian in Food Safety” by the American Association of Food Safety Veterinarians, and “Outstanding Woman in Veterinary Medicine” by the Association for Women Veterinarians. In 2002, she received a Certificate of Merit for her work on the Food Biosecurity Action Team. In 2004, Dr. Buntain became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and was inducted into the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society. In 2006 she was inducted into the National Academies of Practice. Dr. Buntain received her DVM (1977) from Colorado State University, and her BS and MS in Animal Science from the University of Hawaii. Dr. Buntain completed an internship in Food Animal Medicine at the University of Glasgow, Scotland in 1978 and a two-year residency in Large Animal Medicine and Surgery at the University of Missouri in 1980. She owned an equine veterinary practice in Hawaii from 1980-1990, and hosted an award-winning public television show, “Pets and People”.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
×

Dr. Henry E. Childers
American Veterinary Medical Association

Dr. Henry Childers, a small animal practitioner in Cranston, Rhode Island, is only the second veterinarian to serve as both president of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) and the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). In addition to his practice, he is an assistant clinical professor in the School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. After earning his veterinary degree from Auburn University, Dr. Childers served two years in the U.S. Army Veterinary Corp before acquiring the Cranston Animal Hospital in 1957. He became a Diplomate in the specialty, American Board of Veterinary Practitioners where he served as a member of their Council of Regents and was chairman of their Continuing Education Committee. Throughout his career Dr. Childers has been active in organized veterinary medicine. In addition to serving two terms as President of the Rhode Island Veterinary Medical Association, Dr. Childers served as their secretary/treasurer, and chaired the Continuing Education Committee for 15 years. He also served as chair of the Rhode Island Veterinary Board of Examiners. Nationally, Dr. Childers served as the president of the AVMA, and served on the AVMA Councils on Education and Public Relations, the Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities, and as a consultant to the National Board Examination Committee. As an AVMA Executive Board member, he represented District I, acting on behalf of veterinarians in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island and Vermont, on the AVMA Executive Board. Dr. Childers served as President of the American Animal Hospital Association, chair of their Annual Scientific Meeting, President of the AAHA Foundation, and as a member of the Review Board of the Foundation. His awards include: first recipient of the Rhode Island Veterinary Medical Association Veterinarian of the Year Award; (2006); 2001 Massachusetts Veterinary Medical Association’s Distinguished Service Award (2001); the AAHA Practitioner of the Year Award (1992) and AAHA’s Northeast Region Practitioner of the Year (1991); 1995 Rhode Island Veterinary Medical Association (RIVMA) Vanguard Award for his services to the Association (1995); 1990 Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine’s Distinguished Alumnus Award (199); 1984 AVMA Veterinary Continuing Educator Award (1984); and the Tuft University School of Veterinary Medicine Childers Award, an annual award established in 1992 in honor of Dr. Childers for sustained and extraordinary contributions to the education of Tufts Veterinary students

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
×

Dr. Gary Cockerell
Cockerell Alliances

Gary Cockerell is a private consultant (Cockerell Alliances) and Director of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists and Society for Toxicological Pathology Coalition for Veterinary Pathology Fellows, a unique educational partnership between industry and academia he founded in 2004. From 1998-2003 and until its acquisition by Pfizer, he served as Director of Investigative Toxicology for the Pharmacia Corporation in Kalamazoo, MI. During this time he also founded the Investigative Toxicology Interest Group, an inter-pharmaceutical effort to benchmark strategies and practices used for investigational toxicology and pathology studies in drug development programs. Before joining the pharmaceutical industry, Dr. Cockerell served on the faculty of the Department of Pathology of Colorado State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (1985-1998), and before that, of the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University (1976-1985). He is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists. Since 2009 he has also served as a consulting pathologist for Seventh Wave Laboratories, a contract research organization based in St. Louis, Missouri.

Dr. Harold Davis
Amgen, Inc. [retired]

Harold Davis is the former Vice President of Pre-clinical Safety at Amgen, Inc. He also was the Director of Toxicology and Laboratory Animal Resources at Amgen. Prior to his retirement from the Air Force with the rank of lieutenant colonel, Dr. Davis served as the Chief of Ultrastructural Pathology at the Naval Medical Research Institute in Bethesda, MD., and as Chief of Pathology at the School of Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. He decided to make a career in the pharmaceutical/biotechnology industry and worked at American Cyanamid Inc. in Pearl River, N. Y., until that company was acquired by American Home Products of Philadelphia. Dr. Davis has been actively involved with the Association of Minority Health Professional Schools.. He is a past president of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, and has served on the Board of Directors of the California Biomedical Research Association and the Science Board to the US Food and Drug Administration. A native of Birmingham, Alabama, Dr. Davis received his PhD in cardiovascular pathology from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, and his DVM (1976) and BS from Tuskegee University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
×

Dr. Malcolm Getz
Vanderbilt University

Malcolm Getz is an associate professor of economics at Vanderbilt University. He is also the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Economics at Vanderbilt. His research interests are in urban economics, public finance, and higher education. He was Director of the Jean and Alexander Heard Library (1984-94) and Associate Provost for Information Services and Technology (1985-94). He is the author of several books, including Economic Challenges in Higher Education (with Charles T. Clotfelter, Ronald G. Ehrenberg, John J. Siegfried; University of Chicago Press, 1991) and Veterinary Medicine in Economic Transition (Iowa State University Press, 1997). Dr. Getz won the Jeffrey Nordhaus Prize for Teaching in the College of Arts and Science (1998), the Ernest A. Jones Prize for Faculty Advising (1998), and the Madison Sarratt Prize for Undergraduate Teaching at Vanderbilt (2000). His latest book is: Investing in College, A Guide for the Perplexed (Harvard University Press, 2007). Dr. Getz received his PhD (1973) in economics from Yale University, and BA (1967) in economics from Williams College.

Dr. Tracey S. McNamara
Western University of Health Sciences

Tracey S. McNamara is a veterinary pathologist and consultant. She specializes in the recognition and understanding of the diseases of captive and free-ranging wildlife and is best known for her work on West Nile virus. Dr. McNamara held the Schiff Family Distinguished Scientist in Wild Animal Pathology endowed chair at the Bronx Zoo/Wildlife Conservation Society (1987-2003). She received the President’s Award from the American Veterinary Medical Association in recognition of “her contributions and dedication to animal, human, and public health [for] overcoming obstacles and resistance to identify West Nile Virus [and for utilizing] the facilities of zoos to establish surveillance and monitoring programs to control and combat the disease”. She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathology and Vice President of the Charles Louis Davis, DVM Foundation for the Advancement of Veterinary and Comparative Pathology. Dr. McNamara was a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Associate of the Consortium for Conservation Medicine (Harvard Medical School’s Center for Health and Global Environment, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine’s Center for Conservation Medicine and Wildlife Trust), a Visiting Fellow in the Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Service, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, and Adjunct Professor

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
×

in the Department of Pathology of Purdue University. Dr. McNamara received her DVM from the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University, and her BS in psychology and French literature from St. Lawrence University.

Dr. Gay Y. Miller
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Gay Y. Miller is a professor with appointments in the Departments of Pathobiology and Veterinary Clinical Medicine in the College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics in the College of Agricultural, Consumer, and Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Population Medicine, in the College of Veterinary Medicine, and the University of Minnesota. Her professional interests are in the economic impact of disease prevention and control in food animals. This has been an expanding area of interest for the veterinary profession in the last three decades. She has worked on computer modeling and estimating the economic impact of disease prevention and control programs for food animal producers at the farm level. In 2006-2007, Dr. Miller did an AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowship, and was placed to work in the USDA, Veterinary Services, National Center for Animal Health Emergency Management, National Veterinary Stockpile. As a result of these experiences, she has maintained on-going working relationships with Veterinary Services and has had cooperative agreements with them since that time. Her research and service work now is focused on Foreign Animal Disease Preparedness and Response, the economic impacts of FADs and how to cost effectively and efficiently manage FAD preparedness and response. Dr. Miller received her PhD (1991) in agricultural economics, DVM (1981), and BS (1977) degrees in agricultural economics from the Ohio State University, and MS (1982) in agricultural economics from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Dr. Bennie I. Osburn
University of California, Davis [Emeritus]

Bennie I. Osburn is retired Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine at University of California (UC), Davis and was interim executive director of the Association of American Veterinary Colleges. His scientific career focused on the health and welfare of food animals, particularly cattle and sheep. He has been involved in key discoveries about food animal viruses, developmental immunology, congenital infections and more recently, food safety. He has published more than 285 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Osburn is a member of the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars, Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
×

Pathologist (ACVP) and Past President of ACVP, the American Association of Veterinary Immunologists, Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges, and Chair of USDA’s Agricultural Biotechnology Research Advisory Committee. Dr. Osburn served as head of the Infectious Disease and Immunology Unit at the California Regional Primate and Research Center from 1975 to 1983 and as Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Programs at UC Davis from 1975 until he became dean in 1996. Dr. Osburn earned his BS and DVM degrees at Kansas State University, and his PhD (1965) in Comparative Pathology at the University of California, Davis. From 1964 to 1968 he served on the faculty at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Oklahoma State University.

Dr. Mark V. Pauly
University of Pennsylvania

Mark Pauly received a PhD in economics from the University of Virginia. Dr. Pauly is a former commissioner on the Physician Payment Review Commission and an active member of the Institute of Medicine. One of the nation’s leading health economists, Dr. Pauly has made significant contributions to the fields of medical economics and health insurance. His classic study on the economics of moral hazard was the first to point out how health insurance coverage may affect patients’ use of medical services. Subsequent work, both theoretical and empirical, has explored the impact of conventional insurance coverage on preventive care, on outpatient care, and on prescription drug use in managed care. He is currently studying the effect of poor health on worker productivity. In addition, he has explored the influences that determine whether insurance coverage is available and, through several cost effectiveness studies, the influence of medical care and health practices on health outcomes and cost. His interests in health policy deal with ways to reduce the number of uninsured people through tax credits for public and private insurance, and appropriate design for Medicare in a budget-constrained environment. Dr. Pauly is a co-editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics and an associate editor of the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty. He has served on Institute of Medicine panels on public accountability for health insurers under Medicare and on improving the supply of vaccines.

Dr. Fred W. Quimby
The Rockefeller University [retired]

Fred Quimby is the former Associate Vice President and Senior Director of the Laboratory Animal Research Center at Rockefeller University, positions he held until 2007. Before arriving at Rockefeller, he was a Professor of Pathology at Weill Medical College of Cornell University and the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine. He was a faculty member in the Graduate Schools of Veterinary Medicine, Immunology, and Environmental Toxicology with primary

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
×

research interests in immunotoxicology and immune mediated diseases of animals. He was also the Director of the Division of Laboratory Animal Services and the Cornell University Center for Research Animal Resources. Since retirement Dr. Quimby has consulted for several academic institutions and corporations. He previously served on eight NRC/ILAR committees including the Committee on Increasing Veterinary Involvement in Biomedical Research (2004) and the Committee for the Update of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (2011).

Dr. Stephen F. Sutherland
Pfizer Animal Health

Stephen F. Sutherland is the Senior Director of U.S. Regulatory Affairs at Pfizer Animal Health’s Veterinary Medicine Research and Development organization. He served as a private practitioner in companion and food animal practices for five years. He entered the animal health pharmaceutical industry as a Technical Services veterinarian for Bristol-Myers Animal Health. He has also served as a Director of Technical Services and Director of Product Development for Fort Dodge Animal Health. He has held a variety of positions over the past 15 years while employed by Upjohn, Pharmacia and Upjohn, Pharmacia, and now Pfizer, with positions including Manager of New Business Development, Director and Senior Director of Global Regulatory Affairs, and Senior Director of U.S. Clinical Development. Dr. Sutherland received his DVM and BS degrees from the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Workforce Needs in Veterinary Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13413.
×
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The U.S. veterinary medical profession contributes to society in diverse ways, from developing drugs and protecting the food supply to treating companion animals and investigating animal diseases in the wild. In a study of the issues related to the veterinary medical workforce, including demographics, workforce supply, trends affecting job availability, and capacity of the educational system to fill future demands, a National Research Council committee found that the profession faces important challenges in maintaining the economic sustainability of veterinary practice and education, building its scholarly foundations, and evolving veterinary service to meet changing societal needs.

Many concerns about the profession came into focus following the outbreak of West Nile fever in 1999, and the subsequent outbreaks of SARS, monkeypox, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, highly pathogenic avian influenza, H1N1 influenza, and a variety of food safety and environmental issues heightened public concerns. They also raised further questions about the directions of veterinary medicine and the capacity of public health service the profession provides both in the United States and abroad.

To address some of the problems facing the veterinary profession, greater public and private support for education and research in veterinary medicine is needed. The public, policymakers, and even medical professionals are frequently unaware of how veterinary medicine fundamentally supports both animal and human health and well-being. This report seeks to broaden the public's understanding and attempts to anticipate some of the needs and measures that are essential for the profession to fulfill given its changing roles in the 21st century.

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