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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13485.
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Appendix C

Workshop Agenda

DEFINING THE ADEQUACY OF SNAP ALLOTMENTS

A Workshop for the Committee on Examination of the
Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP Allotments

House of Sweden
2900 K Street, NW
Washington, DC 20007

March 28, 2012

8:00-8:45 a.m.

Registration

INTRODUCTION

8:50

Welcome

Julie Caswell, Chair, Committee on Examination of the Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP Allotments

SESSION 1: APPROACHES TO DETERMINING NUTRITIONAL ADEQUACY AMONG SNAP PARTICIPANTS

 

Moderated by James Ziliak, Committee on Examination of the Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP Allotments

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13485.
×

9:00

Defining Nutritional Adequacy in Food Assistance Programs: Food-Based vs. Nutrient-Based Assessment

Suzanne Murphy, Emeritus, University of Hawaii Cancer Center

9:20

Food Insecurity, SNAP Participation, and Alleviation of Hunger

Craig Gundersen, University of Illinois

9:40

Food Insecurity Measures and Assessment of Nutritional Adequacy

Ed Frongillo, University of South Carolina

10:00

Q&A

10:30

Break

SESSION 2: FOOD PURCHASE AND CONSUMPTION BEHAVIOR IN LOW-INCOME HOUSEHOLDS

 

Moderated by Sara Bleich, Committee on Examination of the Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP Allotments

11:00

Influence of Special Needs on Purchase Decisions of Low-Income Households

Hilary Seligman, University of California, San Francisco

11:20

Tracking Purchase Behavior of Low-Income Households: Assessment of Data Needs

Ephraim Leibtag, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (USDA-ERS)

11:40

Q&A

12:00 p.m.

Break for Lunch

SESSION 3: DESIGN OF THE SNAP BENEFIT

 

Moderated by Barbara Laraia, Committee on Examination of the Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP Allotments

1:00

The SNAP Benefit Formula: Overview and Policy Perspectives

Parke Wilde, Tufts University

1:20

Geographic Differences in SNAP Benefit Formula: Lessons from the Supplemental Poverty Measure

Trudi Renwick, U.S. Census Bureau

1:40

Q&A

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13485.
×

SESSION 4: CHALLENGES TO ACHIEVING NUTRITIONAL ADEQUACY FOR SNAP PARTICIPANTS

 

Moderated by Sheila Mammen, Committee on Examination of the Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP Allotments

2:00

Choices Consumers Make to Stretch Food Dollars

Elaine Waxman, Feeding America, Chicago, Illinois

2:20

Ways SNAP Participants Supplement Their Benefits: Challenges Faced by Seniors

Enid Borden, Meals On Wheels, Alexandria, Virginia

2:40

Q&A

3:00

Break

SESSION 5: CHALLENGES TO DEFINING THE ADEQUACY OF SNAP ALLOTMENTS

 

Moderated by Jamie Dollahite, Committee on Examination of the Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP Allotments

3:30

Food Prices and Selection Options in Food Stores and Markets Serving Low-Income Households

Helen Jensen, Iowa State University

3:50

Time Challenges: Food Preparation

George Davis, Virginia Tech

4:10

Administrative Challenges: Accessing SNAP Benefits

Stacy Dean, Center for Budget and Policy Priorities

4:30

Q&A

5:00

Public Comments

5:30

Final Comments and Adjourn

 

Julie Caswell, Chair, Committee on Examination of the Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP Allotments

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13485.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13485.
×
Page 195
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13485.
×
Page 196
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13485.
×
Page 197
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13485.
×
Page 198
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For many Americans who live at or below the poverty threshold, access to healthy foods at a reasonable price is a challenge that often places a strain on already limited resources and may compel them to make food choices that are contrary to current nutritional guidance. To help alleviate this problem, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) administers a number of nutrition assistance programs designed to improve access to healthy foods for low-income individuals and households. The largest of these programs is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly called the Food Stamp Program, which today serves more than 46 million Americans with a program cost in excess of $75 billion annually. The goals of SNAP include raising the level of nutrition among low-income households and maintaining adequate levels of nutrition by increasing the food purchasing power of low-income families.

In response to questions about whether there are different ways to define the adequacy of SNAP allotments consistent with the program goals of improving food security and access to a healthy diet, USDA's Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) asked the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to conduct a study to examine the feasibility of defining the adequacy of SNAP allotments, specifically: the feasibility of establishing an objective, evidence-based, science-driven definition of the adequacy of SNAP allotments consistent with the program goals of improving food security and access to a healthy diet, as well as other relevant dimensions of adequacy; and data and analyses needed to support an evidence-based assessment of the adequacy of SNAP allotments.

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy reviews the current evidence, including the peer-reviewed published literature and peer-reviewed government reports. Although not given equal weight with peer-reviewed publications, some non-peer-reviewed publications from nongovernmental organizations and stakeholder groups also were considered because they provided additional insight into the behavioral aspects of participation in nutrition assistance programs. In addition to its evidence review, the committee held a data gathering workshop that tapped a range of expertise relevant to its task.

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