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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
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Appendix A

WORKSHOP AGENDA
REDUCING TOBACCO-RELATED CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY: A WORKSHOP

June 11 and 12, 2012

Lecture Room
National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20418

STATEMENT OF TASK

An ad hoc committee will plan and conduct a public workshop, whose agenda will examine the impact of tobacco use on cancer incidence and mortality, and explore ways to reduce that impact. The workshop, which will feature invited presentations and discussion, will address such topics as

•   evidence linking tobacco use to the incidence, progression, and treatment outcome for various types of cancer;

•   biological mechanisms responsible for that linkage and how to target them;

•   the impact of state, federal, and employer programs to reduce tobacco use;

•   the new role of the FDA in regulating tobacco products; and

•   international perspectives.

Workshop participants will discuss potential ways in which research could advance the prevention and treatment of tobacco-related cancers as well as enhance the regulation of tobacco products from a cancer perspective. Workshop participants will also explore potential ways to more broadly

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
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implement effective strategies to reduce tobacco use. An individually-authored summary of the workshop will subsequently be prepared by a designated rapporteur.

AGENDA

Day 1: June 11, 2012
 
8:00 a.m. Breakfast and Registration
 
8:30 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks from the IOM National Cancer Policy Forum
 

•   John Mendelsohn, MD Anderson Cancer Center National Cancer Policy Forum Chair

 

•   Roy Herbst, Yale Cancer Center Workshop Planning Committee Chair

 
8:40 a.m. Session 1: Workshop Introduction: The Changing Face of Tobacco Use Over Time
Moderator: Roy Herbst

Epidemiology Perspective on Tobacco Use in the United States
 

•   Terry Pechacek, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 
  Societal and Policy Perspective on Tobacco Use
 

•   Kenneth Warner, University of Michigan

 
  Panel Discussion
 

•   Including speakers and Otis Brawley, American Cancer Society

 
10:00 a.m. Session 2: Federal Level Tobacco Policy
Moderator: Matthew Myers, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
×
  Overview of the National Tobacco Strategy

•   Howard Koh, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

 

•   Lawrence Deyton, FDA Center for Tobacco Products

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

 

•   Tim McAfee, CDC Office on Smoking and Health

 
  Panel Discussion
 

•   Including speakers and David Abrams, Legacy

 
11:45 a.m. Lunch
 
12:45 p.m. Session 3: State Level Tobacco Policies
Moderator: Carolyn Dresler, Arkansas Department of Health

State Policy Initiatives and Funding Needs
 

•   Danny McGoldrick, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

 
  Overview of State Tobacco Control Programs
 

•   Karla Sneegas, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 
  State-Level Exemplars of Policy Change
 

•   Thomas Land, Massachusetts Department of Public Health

 

•   Colleen Stevens, California Department of Health Services

 
  Panel Discussion
 

•   Including speakers and Russ Sciandra, American Cancer Society

 
2:45 p.m. Break
 
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
×
3:00 p.m. Session 4: Treatment for Cessation
Moderator: Michael Fiore, University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention

Cessation: Clinical Practice and Guidelines
 

•   Michael Fiore, University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention

 
  Opportunities and Challenges for Health Care Providers in Tobacco Dependence Treatment
 

•   Linda Sarna, University of California, Los Angeles

 
  The Art of Treatment: Clinical Applications and Challenges
 

•   Richard Hurt, Mayo Clinic

 
  Lung Cancer Screening and Cessation
 

•   Jamie Ostroff, Memorial-Sloan Kettering

 
  Panel Discussion
 
5:00 p.m. Wrap-Up and Adjourn Day 1
Roy Herbst, Yale Cancer Center
 
Day 2: June 12, 2012
 
7:30 a.m. Breakfast and Registration
 
8:00 a.m. Welcome, Recap of Day 1
 

•   Roy Herbst, Yale Cancer Center

 
8:05 a.m. Session 5: Cancer Patients
Moderators: Roy Herbst, Yale Cancer Center, and Ellen R. Gritz, MD Anderson Cancer

Molecular Biology
 

•   Fadlo Khuri, Emory University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
×
 
  Tobacco Use and Cancer Outcomes
 

•   Graham Warren, Roswell Park Cancer Institute

 
  Tobacco Cessation in Cancer Patients
 

•   Ellen R. Gritz, MD Anderson Cancer Center

 
  The War on Cancer Starts with Tobacco Control
 

•   K. Michael Cummings, Medical University of South Carolina

 
  Panel Discussion
 

•   Including speakers and Michele Bloch, National Cancer Institute

 
10:05 a.m. Break
 
10:15 a.m. Session 6: Communication: What Messages Are Most Effective for Preventing Initiation of and for Quitting Tobacco Use
Moderators: Benjamin Toll, Yale Cancer Center, and Brenda Nevidjon, Duke University

Cigarette Warning Labels
 

•   David Hammond, University of Waterloo

 
  Technology-Based Programs for Prevention and Cessation
 

•   Alexander V. Prokhorov, MD Anderson Cancer Center

 
  Message Framing to Promote Tobacco Cessation
 

•   Benjamin Toll, Yale Cancer Center

 
  Media to Reduce Tobacco Use
 

•   Cheryl G. Healton, Legacy

 
  Panel Discussion
 

•   Including speakers and Geoffrey Fong, University of Waterloo

 
12:15 p.m. Wrap-Up and Adjourn
Roy Herbst, Yale Cancer Center
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13495.
×
Page 92
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Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in United States, causing more than 440,000 deaths annually and resulting in $193 billion in health-related economic losses each year--$96 billion in direct medical costs and $97 billion in lost productivity. Since the first U.S. Surgeon General's report on smoking in 1964, more than 29 Surgeon General's reports, drawing on data from thousands of studies, have documented the overwhelming and conclusive biologic, epidemiologic, behavioral, and pharmacologic evidence that tobacco use is deadly. This evidence base links tobacco use to the development of multiple types of cancer and other life-threatening conditions, including cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Smoking accounts for at least 30 percent of all cancer deaths, and 80 percent of lung cancer deaths. Despite the widespread agreement on the dangers of tobacco use and considerable success in reducing tobacco use prevalence from over 40 percent at the time of the 1964 Surgeon General's report to less than 20 percent today, recent progress in reducing tobacco use has slowed. An estimated 18.9 percent of U.S. adults smoke cigarettes, nearly one in four high school seniors smoke, and 13 percent of high school males use smokeless tobacco products.

In recognition that progress in combating cancer will not be fully achieved without addressing the tobacco problem, the National Cancer Policy Forum of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened a public workshop, Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality, June 11-12, 2012 in Washington, DC. In opening remarks to the workshop participants, planning committee chair Roy Herbst, professor of medicine and of pharmacology and chief of medical oncology at Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital, described the goals of the workshop, which were to examine the current obstacles to tobacco control and to discuss potential policy, outreach, and treatment strategies that could overcome these obstacles and reduce tobacco-related cancer incidence and mortality. Experts explored a number of topics, including: the changing demographics of tobacco users and the changing patterns of tobacco product use; the influence of tobacco use on cancer incidence and cancer treatment outcomes; tobacco dependence and cessation programs; federal and state level laws and regulations to curtail tobacco use; tobacco control education, messaging, and advocacy; financial and legal challenges to tobacco control efforts; and research and infrastructure needs to support tobacco control strategies, reduce tobacco related cancer incidence, and improve cancer patient outcomes. Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality summarizes the workshop.

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