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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Software Tool: Phase II: Prototype of a Decision-Support System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13531.
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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Software Tool: Phase II: Prototype of a Decision-Support System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13531.
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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Software Tool: Phase II: Prototype of a Decision-Support System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13531.
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Page 71
Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Software Tool: Phase II: Prototype of a Decision-Support System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13531.
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SMART Vaccines--Strategic Multi-Attribute Ranking Tool for Vaccines--is a prioritization software tool developed by the Institute of Medicine that utilizes decision science and modeling to help inform choices among candidates for new vaccine development. A blueprint for this computer-based guide was presented in the 2012 report Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Framework: Phase I.

Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Software Tool,Phase II extends the proof-of-concept presented in the Phase I report, which was based on multi-attribute utility theory. This report refines a beta version of the model developed in the Phase I report and presents its next iteration, SMART Vaccines 1.0.

Ranking Vaccines: Phase II discusses the methods underlying the development, validation, and evaluation of SMART Vaccines 1.0. It also discusses how SMART Vaccines should--and, just as importantly, should not--be used. The report also offers ideas for future enhancements for SMART Vaccines as well as for ideas for expanded uses and considerations and possibilities for the future.

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