National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Chapter 10 - Further Research
Page 199
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2008. Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13918.
×
Page 199
Page 200
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2008. Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13918.
×
Page 200

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

1. FAA. New England Regional Aviation System Plan, October 2006. 2. Adler, T. Air Travelers 2002/2003: The New Realities? Resource Systems Group, March 2003. 3. Air Transport Action Group. The America’s Air Traffic: 1985-2011. Geneva, 1998. 4. Aaronson, R. Quoted in “World’s Airports Expect Nine Billion Passengers in 2025,” Travel Daily News, February 2007. www.traveldailynews.com/new.asp?newid=35188&subcategory_id=53 5. Southern California Association of Governments. “Regional Aviation Plan for the 2001 Regional Transportation Plan,” 2001. 6. Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments. Washington-Baltimore Regional Airport System Plan Ground Access Update, 2007. 7. Los Angeles World Airports. LAX Master Plan Documents. www.laxmasterplan.org 8. Wen, Y., K. Yan, X. Qiao, and J. Shi. “The Characteristic Analysis of Passengers’ Selection of Ground Transport Mode Connecting Shanghai Pudong International Airport and the Downtown Area,” paper presented at the 85th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, 2006, Washington, D.C., Compendium of Papers CD-ROM. 9. Noble, R., and the Mass Transit Railway Corporation. “Hong Kong’s Airport Express: Lessons from the First Two Months Operations,” paper presented at the Air Rail 98 Conference, Frankfurt, Germany, 1998. 10. Hinz, G. “CTA Shelves Plans for Airport Express Trains,” Crain’s Chicago Business News, October 2006. 11. Metropolitan Transportation Authority New York, NY website (Planning Section). 12. Data for Oakland and San Francisco based on Metropolitan Transportation Commission Year 2002 surveys and San Francisco International Airport Ground Access Survey 2006. Oakland rail share calculated from AirBART ridership data. 13. Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Ground Access Surveys, 2005. 14. MarketSense, from Massachusetts Port Authority Surveys, 2003. 15. National Capital Region Transportation Planning Board, Metropolitan Washington Council of Govern- ments, Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, and Maryland Aviation Administration. 2005 Washington-Baltimore Regional Air Passenger Survey, January 2006. 16. Leigh Fisher Associates, M.A. Coogan, and MarketSense. TCRP Report 62: Improving Public Transportation Access to Large Airports. TRB, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2000. 17. MarketSense, from Atlanta Airport, 2005. 18. Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, Division of Planning and Policy Development. 1990 Rail Passenger Study, p.14. 19. MarketSense, from Los Angeles World Airports, 2001. 20. Resource System Group. Chicago Origin-Destination Survey Report, January 2004. 21. Chicago Transit Authority, Strategic Planning Department. O’Hare Airport Ground Travel Survey, June 1990. 22. MarketSense, from SEATAC Airport Surveys, 2006. 23. Jacobs Consultancy. Terminal Access Study, Portland International Airport, March 2005. 24. Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Surveys, 1992 and 1997. 25. MarketSense, from Philadelphia International Airport Ground Access Survey. 26. Wilson, Hewitt & Associates. Philadelphia International Airport Ground Transportation Passenger Survey, Interpretation of Survey Results, 1986. 27. Meyer, K., C. Schmid, B. Steimann, R. Windisch. Vergleich internationaler Flughäfen, Projekt 42, Zurich Airport Authority, 2005. 28. MTRC. Personal communication, 2005. 29. Soo, E. “Determining Passenger Demands and Customer Service Requirements,” paper presented at the Air Rail East West Conference, Hong Kong, 1998. 199 References

30. Civil Aviation Authority. CAA Passenger Survey Report 2004, Survey of Passengers at Gatwick, Heathrow, Luton, Manchester & Stansted Airports. 31. Aéroports de Paris. Personal communication. 32. International AirRail Organization (IARO). Schiphol Airport. 33. Munich Airport website, www.munich-airport.de/en/consumer/index.jsp. 34. Bayman, R. “Positioning Commuter Rail Services to Serve Airports: Who Needs the Metro?” Paper presented at the Air/Rail East West Conference, Frankfurt, Germany, 1998 35. Civil Aviation Authority. Surveys, 1997. 36. Pavaux, J. “Rail/Air Complementarity in Europe: The Impact of High Speed Train Services.” Institute of Air Transport, Paris, 1991. 37. Sharp, A., and P. LeBlond. IARO Report 10.06: Check-in on Airport Railways; Draft for Consultation, Inter- national Air Rail Organisation, London. 38. Kriger, E., “DUS Rail Access, History Development, Experiences,” presentation at the eAirRail Conference, Düsseldorf, Germany, April 4, 2006 (Survey in 2002). 39. American Travel Survey, 1995. 40. GAO. Intermodal Transportation: Potential Strategies Would Redefine Federal Role in Developing Airport Intermodal Capabilities, 2005. 41. Jones, C. “Remote Baggage Checks Coming to Airport.” Las Vegas Review Journal, May 27, 2005. 42. Bags to Go Enterprises. www.baggagecheckin.com 43. New Jersey Transit. Ongoing program of monitoring. 44. I-95 Corridor Coalition. “Intermodal Service at the Newark Liberty International Airport Train Station: Observations and Lessons Learned,” October 2004. 66.167.232.132/pm/projectmanagement/Upfiles/reports/ full268.pdf 45. Elmore-Yalch, R. TCRP Report 36: A Handbook: Using Market Segmentation to Increase Transit Ridership, TRB, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 1998. 46. Blakenship, A.B., and G.E. Breen. State of the Art of Market Research. American Marketing Association, Chicago, 1996. 47. Leigh Fisher Associates, M.A. Coogan, and MarketSense. TCRP Report 83: Strategies for Improving Public Transportation Access to Large Airports, TRB, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2002. 48. Lehr, F. “Vienna International Airport–AirRail 2007.” Proceedings from International Air Rail Organi- zation, 2007. 200 Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation

Next: Appendix - Abbreviations and Acronyms »
Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 4: Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation examines key elements associated with the creation of a six-step market-based strategy for improving the quality of public mode services at U.S. airports. The report also addresses the context for public transportation to major airports, explores the attributes of successful airport ground access systems, presents an airport by airport summary of air traveler ground access mode-share by public transportation services, and more.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!