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Control of Invasive Species (2006)

Chapter: References

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Page 87
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2006. Control of Invasive Species. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14020.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2006. Control of Invasive Species. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14020.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2006. Control of Invasive Species. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14020.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2006. Control of Invasive Species. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14020.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2006. Control of Invasive Species. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14020.
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Page 91

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

87 1. Environmental Procedure Manual, Section 4.8, New York State Department of Transportation, Albany, rev. 2004. 2. Schmidt, W., “Plant Dispersal by Motor Vehicles,” Vegetation, Vol. 80, 1989, pp. 147–152. 3. Lonsdale, W.M. and A.M. Lane, “Tourist Vehicles as Vectors of Weed Seeds in Kakadu National Park, Northern Australia,” Biological Conservation, Vol. 69, 1994, pp. 277–283. 4. “Invasive Species,” Executive Order 13112, Presidential Documents, White House, Washington, D.C., Feb. 3, 1999. 5. “Alien Plant Invaders of Natural Areas: Weeds Gone Wild: Background Information,” Alien Plant Working Group, Washington, D.C., 2000 [Online]. Available: www.nps.gov/plants/alien/bkgd.htm. 6. Wilcove, D.S., D. Rothstein, J. Dubow, A. Phillips, and E. Losos, “Leading Threats to Biodiversity: What’s Imperiling U.S. Species?” In Precious Heritage: The Status of Biodiversity in the United States, L. Shaffer and B.A. Stein, eds., Oxford University Press, New York, N.Y., 2000, pp. 239–254. 7. Schmitz, D.C. and D. Simberloff, “Needed: A National Center for Biological Invasions,” Issues in Science and Technology, Vol. 17, 2001, pp. 57–62. 8. Harmful non-Indigenous Species in the United States, Report OTA-F-565, Office of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress, Washington, D.C., Sep. 1993. 9. Callicot, J.B. and G.K. Lore, The Nature of Roadsides and the Tools to Work with It, FHWA-EP-03005, Office of Natural and Human Environment, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., 1999, 32 pp. 10. Invasive Species: Clearer Focus and Greater Commit- ment Needed to Effectively Manage the Problem, Report to Executive Agency Officials, GAO-03-1, U.S. General Accounting Office, Washington, D.C., 2002, 109 pp. 11. “Federal Highway Administration Guidance on Invasive Species,” Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., Aug. 10, 1999 [Online]. Avail- able: www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/inv_guid.htm. 12. Westbrooks, R.G., Invasive Plants: Changing the Landscape of America, Federal Interagency Committee for the Management of Noxious and Exotic Weeds (FICMNEW), Washington, D.C., 1998, 107 pp. 13. 2005/2006 Workplan, Federal Interagency Committee for the Management of Noxious and Exotic Weeds (FICMNEW), Washington, D.C. [Online]. Available: invasivespecies.gov/docs/ficmnewworkplan.pdf. 14. Invasive Species: Federal Efforts and State Perspec- tives on Challenges and National Leadership, GAO- 03-916T, U.S. General Accounting Office, Testimony Before the Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, and Water, Committee on Environment and Public Works, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C., June 17, 2003. 15. Halting the Invasion: State Tools for Invasive Species Management, Environmental Law Institute, 2002 [Online]. Available: www2.eli.org/research/invasives/ pdfs/d12-06.pdf. 16. “Guidelines for Coordinated Management of Noxious Weeds: Development of Weed Management Areas,” The Center for Invasive Plant Management, Bozeman, Mont. [Online]. Available: www.weedcenter.org/ management/guidelines/tableofcontents.html. 17. VanBebber, R., Cooperative Weed Management Area (CWMA) Cookbook, Idaho Noxious Weed Coordinat- ing Committee, Boise, 2005. 18. Worrall, J., Review of Systems for Early Detection and Rapid Response, USDA Forest Service, Prepared for the National Invasive Species Council, Washington, D.C., June 6, 2002. 19. Ruiz, G.M. and J.T. Carlton, Eds., Pathways of Inva- sions: Strategies for Management Across Space and Time, Island Press, Washington, D.C., 2001. 20. Spellerberg, I.F., “Ecological Effects of Roads and Traffic: A Literature Review,” Global Ecology and Biogeography Letters, Vol. 7, 1998, pp. 317–333. 21. Environmental Planning and Management Processes, Roads and Traffic Authority, New South Wales, Australia [Online]. Available: www.rta.nsw.gov.au/ environment/environmentalplanningmgt/index.html. 22. “Environmental Impact Assessment Policy, Guidelines, and Procedures,” Chapter 5.2.2.1, Roads and Traffic Authority, New South Wales, Australia [Online]. Avail- able: www.rta.nsw.gov.au/environment/downloads/en vironmental_impact_assessment_guidelines.html. 23. “Environmental Impact Assessment Policy, Guidelines, and Procedures, Chapter 5.2.2.2, Roads and Traffic Authority, New South Wales, Australia [Online]. Available: www.rta.nsw.gov.au/environment/downloads/ environmental_impact_assessment_guidelines.html. 24. “Environmental Impact Assessment Policy, Guidelines, and Procedures,” Chapters 5.2.2.4 and 9.10.3, Roads and Traffic Authority, New South Wales, Australia [Online]. Available:www.rta.nsw.gov.au/environment/downloads/ environmental_impact_assessment_guidelines.html. 25. Global Invasive Species Program, On-line Toolkit, Cape Town, South Africa, Feb. 15, 2001 [Online]. Available: www.cabi-bioscience.ch/wwwgisp/gtc3.htm. 26. Ecological Risk Assessment in the Federal Government, Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Research, National Science and Technology Council (U.S.), Washington, D.C., 1999. 27. Communication on the Precautionary Principle, Commission of the European Communities, Brussels, Belgium. REFERENCES

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78. “New York State Department of Transportation Mow- ing Considerations,” Environmental Procedure Man- ual, Albany, 2004. 79. Mowing to Manage Noxious Weeds, Fact Sheet No. 200104, Montana State University Extension Service, Bozeman, Aug. 2002. 80. Guide to Environmental Stewardship Practices, Pro- cedures, and Policies for Highway Construction and Maintenance, Center for Environmental Excellence, American Association for State Highway and Trans- portation Officials, Washington, D.C., draft. 81. “Maintenance Programs, Vegetation Management Sec- tion, Wildlife Habitat Areas,” North Carolina Depart- ment of Transportation, Raleigh [Online]. Available: www.doh.dot.state.nc.us/operations/dp_chief_eng/road side/vegetation/maintenance/wildlifehabitat.html. 82. Environmental Handbook for Transportation Opera- tions, New York State Department of Transportation Environmental Analysis Bureau, Albany, July 2001, p. 3.1.9. 83. 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91 and Revegetation Success, FHWA Report FHWA/ CA/TL-98/18, Federal Highway Administration and State of California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, Mar. 1998, 111 pp. 106. Clary, R.F., Planting Techniques and Materials for Revegetation of California Roadsides, Highway Re- search Report, FHWA/USDA Publication LMPC-2, California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, 1983, 49 pp. 107. Schafer, W.M. and G.A. Nielsen, “Soil Development and Plant Succession on 1- to 50-Year-Old Strip Mine Spoils in Southeastern Montana,” In Ecology and Coal Resource Development, M.K. Wali, Ed., Pergamon Press, New York, N.Y., 1978, pp. 541–549. 108. Hargis, N.E. and E.F. Redente, “Soil Handling for Sur- face Mine Reclamation,” Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, Vol. 5, 1984, pp. 300–305. 109. Claassen, V.P., The Use of Compost and Co-Compost as a Primary Erosion Control Material, FHWA Report FHWA/CA/TL-2002/30, Federal Highway Adminis- tration and State of California Department of Trans- portation, Sacramento, Mar. 2001, 71 pp. 110. McVay, B., “Federal Contacts Dispatch,” Apr. 2000 [Online]. Available: www.fedgovcontracts.com/ pe00-127.htm. 111. Memo to Landscape Architects on Native Landscape Revegetation Commitments, California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, Apr. 28, 2003. 112. Roadside Manual, Washington State Department of Transportation, Olympia, July 2003, pp. 120–121. 113. “Successes in Streamlining,” Newsletter, Volpe Research Center and Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, Cambridge, Mass., Apr. 2004. 114. Masteller, M., Roadside Vegetation Maintenance on Iowa’s State and County Roadsides: A Cost Analysis Begun in 1995, Iowa Department of Transportation, Ames. 115. “Successful Adirondack Partnership Renews Commit- ment, Expands Reach,” Adirondack Park Agency News Release, Ray Brook, N.Y., Apr. 9, 2004. 116. New York State Adirondack Park Agency, New York State Department of Transportation, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Invasive Plant Council of New York State, and the Adirondack Nature Conservancy, Memorandum of Understanding for the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program, Apr. 8, 2004. 117. “Beyond Pesticides/National Coalition Against the Misuse of Pesticides, Pesticides and You,” Vol. 19, No. 1, 1999, p. 15 [Online]. Available: http://www. beyondpesticides.org/infoservices/pesticidesandyou/ Spring%2099/The%20Right%20Way%20to%20Veg etation%20Management.pdf. 118. Obstacles Hinder Federal Rapid Response to Grow- ing Threat of Invasive Species, Report to Congress, U.S. General Accounting Office, Washington, D.C., July 2001. 119. “Time for a National Center?” Greener Roadsides, Fall 2001. 120. Johnson, A., Best Practices Handbook on Roadside Vegetation Management, Minnesota Technology Transfer (T2) LTAP Program, Center for Transporta- tion Studies, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 2000, p. 4. 121. Lacey, C.A., et al., “Bounty Programs & Incentives: An Effective Weed Management Tool,” Weed Tech- nology, Vol. 2, 1988, pp. 196–197. 122. Larson, J., Curriculum Guidelines and Starter Kits on Controlling Invasive Species, Columbus High School, Columbus, Mont. 123. Parker, K.F., An Illustrated Guide to Arizona Weeds, University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1990. 124. Annotated Literature Review: Model Rapid Response Plan for Great Lakes Aquatic Invasions, Great Lakes Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species, draft, July 2003, 11 pp. 125. Larsen, D. and K. Freitag, Control of Invasive Exotic Plants in the Great Plains: An Annotated Bibliography, Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, U.S. Geo- logical Survey, Jamestown, N.D., 1996. 126. Bibliography of Non-Native Aquatic Species in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Regions, Gulf Marine Fisheries Commission, Ocean Springs, Miss. 127. Annotated Bibliography of the Invasive Species of the Gulf Coast—Galveston Bay Invasive Species Risk Assessment Project, Central Southwest/Gulf Coast Infor- mation Node, National Biological Information Infra- structure, U.S. Geological Survey, The Woodlands, Tex. 128. Rutledge, C.R. and T. McLendon, An Assessment of Exotic Plant Species of Rocky Mountain National Park: Appendix III—Useful Resources, Department of Rangeland Ecosystems Science, Colorado State Uni- versity, Ft. Collins, 1996, 97 pp. 129. Bowen, B. and C. Bailey, Invasive Pest Plants in the Southern Appalachian Mountain Region Bibliography Database, Southern Appalachian Information Node, National Biological Information Structure, U.S. Geo- logical Survey, Reston, Va.,

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TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Synthesis 363: Control of Invasive Species explores the extent to which state departments of transportation are identifying actions that affect the spread of invasive species, preventing introduction, tracking status and locations of “invasives” in a timely and ongoing manner, controlling found populations, restoring invaded habitats, conducting research, and sharing lessons learned. The report documents successful practices and lessons learned. It also synthesizes the state of the practice in developing Integrated (Roadside) Vegetation Management, along with physical, chemical, biological, and cultural control mechanisms.

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