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Climate and Social Stress: Implications for Security Analysis (2013)

Chapter: Appendix B: Briefings Received by the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Briefings Received by the Committee." National Research Council. 2013. Climate and Social Stress: Implications for Security Analysis. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14682.
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Appendix B

Briefings Received by the Committee

January 12, 2012. Daniel Cooley, Colorado State University. Estimating probabilities of climate events in the joint tail.

January 12, 2012. David R. Easterling, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Summer temperatures and drought.

January 12, 2012. Lisa Goddard, Columbia University. Looking to the future: Decadal variability and its prediction in dynamical models.

January 12, 2012. Mary Hayden, National Center for Atmospheric Research. The dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti at the margins: Sensitivity of a coupled natural and human system to climate change.

January 12, 2012. Upmanu Lall, Columbia University. Floods: National Research Council study climate change and security.

January 12, 2012. Robert Lempert, RAND Corporation. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation.

January 12, 2012. Richard L. Smith, University of North Carolina and Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute. Estimating probability of an extreme weather event in the next ten years.

January 12, 2012. Gabriel Vecchi, NOAA and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Cat. 4–5 landfalling tropical cyclones in the coming decade.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Briefings Received by the Committee." National Research Council. 2013. Climate and Social Stress: Implications for Security Analysis. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14682.
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January 13, 2012. Kristie L. Ebi, Carnegie Institution of Washington. IPCC Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation.

March 1, 2012. Daniel P. Aldrich, Purdue University and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). The past, present, and future of the Fukushima nuclear crisis.

March 1, 2012. Marc F. Bellemare, Duke University. Rising food prices, food price volatility, and social unrest.

March 1, 2012. Gary Eilerts, USAID and Chris Funk, U.S. Geological Survey. Climate and related factors that influence African food security: African food security conditions are an important feature of U.S. national security.

March 1, 2012. Thomas M. Parris, ISciences. Environmental indications and warnings.

March 1, 2012. Kaitlin Shilling, Stanford University. Climate and conflict.

March 1, 2012. Mark L. Wilson, University of Michigan. Climate impacts on emerging and re-emerging diseases.

March 2, 2012. Neil Adger, University of East Anglia. Migration, climate change, and national security.

March 2, 2012. Jack A. Goldstone, George Mason University. Forecasting political instability: Political Instability Task Force history and approach.

March 2, 2012. Joseph Hewitt, University of Maryland. 2011 alert lists: Methodological overview.

March 2, 2012. Sari Kovats, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Climate change and health.

March 2, 2012. Jürgen Scheffran, Universität Hamburg. Conflict sensitivity in climate hot spots.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Briefings Received by the Committee." National Research Council. 2013. Climate and Social Stress: Implications for Security Analysis. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14682.
×
Page 187
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Briefings Received by the Committee." National Research Council. 2013. Climate and Social Stress: Implications for Security Analysis. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14682.
×
Page 188
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Climate change can reasonably be expected to increase the frequency and intensity of a variety of potentially disruptive environmental events--slowly at first, but then more quickly. It is prudent to expect to be surprised by the way in which these events may cascade, or have far-reaching effects. During the coming decade, certain climate-related events will produce consequences that exceed the capacity of the affected societies or global systems to manage; these may have global security implications. Although focused on events outside the United States, Climate and Social Stress: Implications for Security Analysis recommends a range of research and policy actions to create a whole-of-government approach to increasing understanding of complex and contingent connections between climate and security, and to inform choices about adapting to and reducing vulnerability to climate change.

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