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The Mathematical Sciences in 2025 (2013)

Chapter: Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
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Appendix F

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Thomas E. Everhart (Chair) is president emeritus of the California Institute of Technology and professor emeritus of electrical engineering and applied physics. He received a Ph.D. in engineering from Cambridge University, England, in 1958. Dr. Everhart joined the University of California at Berkeley in 1958, where he served in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science for more than 20 years. After serving as dean of engineering at Cornell University (1979-1984) and chancellor of the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana (1984-1987), he accepted the presidency of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 1987. He holds a guest appointment at the University of California at Santa Barbara as a Distinguished Visiting Professor and Senior Advisor to the Chancellor. Dr. Everhart’s honors and awards include the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE) Centennial Medal; the 1989 Benjamin Garver Lamme Award from the American Society for Engineering Education; the Clark Kerr Award from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1992; the Founder’s Award in 1995 from the Energy and Resources Group at Berkeley; and the IEEE Founders Medal and Okawa Prize in 2002. A member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and a Foreign Member of the Royal Academy of Engineering, he currently serves on the board of trustees of Caltech and has served on the board of overseers of Harvard University. He is currently a director of the W.M. Keck Foundation and the Kavli Foundation. He has consulted for industry at various times and has served on the boards of directors of General Motors, Hewlett-Packard, Hughes, Raytheon, and Saint-Gobain, among others.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
×

Mark L. Green (Vice-Chair) is a professor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He received a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Princeton University. After teaching at the University of California, Berkeley, and MIT, he came to UCLA as an assistant professor in 1975. He was a founding codirector of the National Science Foundation NSF-funded Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics. Dr. Green’s research has taken him into different areas of mathematics: several complex variables, differential geometry, commutative algebra, Hodge theory, and algebraic geometry. He received an Alfred P. Sloan fellowship, was an invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Berlin in 1998, and was recently elected as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Mathematical Society.

Tanya S. Beder is CEO and chairman of SBCC Group, a financial and risk advisory firm that she founded in 1987. She also serves as a director of American Century mutual fund complex in Mountain View, California, where she chairs the Risk Committee, and as a director of CYS Investments, a specialty finance company traded on the New York Stock Exchange. From 1994 through 2005, Ms. Beder held two senior positions in the asset management industry, first as managing director of Caxton Associates LLC, a $10 billion asset management firm, then as CEO of Tribeca Global Management LLC, a $3 billion dollar multistrategy fund. At SBCC Group, Ms. Beder heads the global strategy, crisis and risk management, derivatives, workout, and fund launch practices. Ms. Beder is a member of the board of directors of the International Association of Financial Engineers, where she co-chairs its Investor Risk Committee. From 1998 through 2003 she was chairman of that association. Euromoney named Ms. Beder one of the top 50 women in finance around the world, and The Hedgefund Journal named her one of the 50 leading women in hedge funds. While CEO of Tribeca, Absolute Return awarded her the prestigious Institutional Investment Manager of the Year Award. Ms. Beder is an author of the book Financial Engineering, The Evolution of a Profession, published in 2011, which discusses the uses and misuses of derivatives and complex instruments in global capital markets, and has written numerous articles in the financial arena. At Stanford University she teaches the course Strategy and Policy Issues in Financial Engineering. Previously Ms. Beder taught courses at Yale University’s School of Management, Columbia University’s Graduate School of Business and Financial Engineering, and the New York Institute of Finance. Ms. Beder also serves on advisory boards at Columbia University and New York University’s Courant Institute and is an appointed Fellow of the International Center for Finance at Yale. She holds an M.B.A.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
×

from Harvard University and a B.A. in mathematics and philosophy from Yale University. She was a member of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF’s) “Odom committee” in the late-1990s, which performed the last introspective study of the mathematical sciences.

James O. Berger is arts and sciences professor in the Department of Statistical Science at Duke University. He received a Ph.D. in mathematics from Cornell University in 1974. Dr. Berger was a faculty member in the Department of Statistics at Purdue University until 1997, at which time he moved to Duke. From 2002 until 2009 he directed the NSF-supported Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute (SAMSI). Dr. Berger was president of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics in 1995 and 1996, chair of the Section on Bayesian Statistical Science of the American Statistical Association in 1995, and president of the International Society for Bayesian Analysis during 2004. Among his awards and honors are Guggenheim and Sloan Fellowships, the President’s Award from the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies in 1985, the Sigma Xi Research Award at Purdue University for contribution of the year to science in 1993, the Fisher Lectureship in 2001, election as foreign member of the Spanish Real Academia de Ciencias in 2002, election to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 2003, an honorary D.Sc. from Purdue University in 2004, and the Wald Lectureship in 2007. Professor Berger currently chairs the NSF’s Advisory Committee for Mathematics and Physical Sciences. His research has primarily been in Bayesian statistics, foundations of statistics, statistical decision theory, simulation, model selection, and various interdisciplinary areas of science and industry, especially astronomy and the interface between computer modeling and statistics. He has supervised 31 Ph.D. dissertations, published over 160 articles, and written or edited 14 books or special volumes.

Luis A. Caffarelli is a professor of mathematics at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences and holds the Sid W. Richardson Foundation Regents Chair in Mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin. He obtained and M.Sc. (1969) and a Ph.D. (1972) at the University of Buenos Aires. He also has been a professor at the University of Minnesota, the University of Chicago, and the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University (NYU). From 1986 to 1996 he was a professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 1991, he was elected to the NAS. He received the Bôcher Prize in 1984. In 2005, he received the prestigious Rolf Schock Prize in Mathematics of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. He recently received the Leroy P. Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Mathematics. Professor Caffarelli is a member of the American Mathematical Society, the Union Matematica Argentina, the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
×

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Pontifical Academy of Sciences. The focus of Professor Caffarelli’s research has been in the area of elliptic nonlinear partial differential equations and their applications. His research has reached from theoretical questions about the regularity of solutions to fully nonlinear elliptic equations to partial regularity properties of Navier-Stokes equations. Some of his most significant contributions are the regularity of free boundary problems and solutions to nonlinear elliptic partial differential equations, optimal transportation theory, and results in the theory of homogenization.

Emmanuel J. Candes is a professor of statistics and mathematics at Stanford University. He has carried out research into compressive sensing, mathematical signal processing, computational harmonic analysis, multiscale analysis, scientific computing, statistical estimation and detection, high-dimensional statistics, theoretical computer science, mathematical optimization, and information theory. He received his Diplôme from the Ecole Polytechnique and his Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University in 1998.

Phillip Colella is senior mathematician and goup leader of the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group at the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a leader in the development of mathematical methods and computer science tools for science and engineering. His work has resulted in software tools applicable in a wide variety of problems in fluid dynamics, shock wave theory, and astrophysics. Dr. Colella received an A.B. and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. He was elected to the NAS in 2004.

David Eisenbud was director of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute at the University of California at Berkeley, from 1997 until 2007, and he continues to serve on the faculty of Berkeley as professor of mathematics. In 2009 he also became director of mathematics and the physical sciences at the Simons Foundation. Dr. Eisenbud received his Ph.D. in mathematics in 1970 at the University of Chicago. He was on the faculty at Brandeis University for 27 years before coming to Berkeley and has also been a visiting professor at Harvard, Bonn, and Paris. His mathematical interests range widely over commutative and noncommutative algebra, algebraic geometry, topology, and computer methods. He was president of the American Mathematical Society (AMS) in 2004 and 2005 and is a director of Math for America, a foundation devoted to improving mathematics teaching. In 2006, Dr. Eisenbud was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Algebra and Number Theory, the Bulletin de la Société Mathématique de

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
×

France, Computing in Science & Engineering, and Springer-Verlag’s book series Algorithms and Computation in Mathematics.

Peter Wilcox Jones is the James E. English Professor of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics at Yale University. He received his doctorate from UCLA in pure mathematics in 1978 and began his lifelong international collaborations during his graduate studies, when he relocated to Paris during his advisor’s year-long sabbatical to the University of Paris at Orsay. Dr. Jones began his academic career at the University of Chicago in 1978, where he served for 2 years as assistant director of the Institut Mittag-Leffler, a research branch of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. He received the Salem Prize in 1981, an award given annually to a young mathematician who has done outstanding work in the theory of Fourier series. Dr. Jones joined the Department of Mathematics at Yale in 1985, where he currently works with a large group that focuses on the value of math in biology and medicine for creating models. Since its inception in 1999, he has served as the chair of the Science Advisory Board at IPAM, a mathematics research institute at UCLA created and funded by the NSF. Dr. Jones is a foreign member of the Swedish Academy of Science and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the NAS.

Ju-Lee Kim is an associate professor of mathematics at MIT. She received a B.S. from the Korean Advanced Institute in Science & Technology in 1991 and a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1997. She had postdoctoral appointments at the École Normale Supérieure and the Institute for Advanced Study before joining the University of Michigan as assistant professor in 1998. In 2002, she moved to the University of Illinois at Chicago before joining MIT. Dr. Kim’s research interests include representation theory, harmonic analysis of p-adic groups, Lie theory, and automorphic forms.

Yann LeCun has been a professor of computer science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at NYU since 2003 and was named Silver Professor in 2008. Dr. LeCun received a Ph.D. in computer science from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris in 1987. He joined the Adaptive Systems Research Department at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, New Jersey, in 1988, where he later became head of the Image Processing Research Department within the Speech and Image Processing Research Lab at AT&T Labs-Research. In 2002, he became a fellow of the NEC Research Institute (now NEC Labs America) in Princeton, New Jersey. Dr. LeCun’s research focuses on machine learning, computer vision, pattern recognition, neural networks, handwriting recognition, image compression, document understanding, image processing, VLSI design, and information theory. His handwriting recognition technology is used by several banks around the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
×

world, and his image compression technology is used by hundreds of Web sites and publishers and millions of users to access scanned documents on the Web.

Jun Liu is a professor of statistics at Harvard University and of biostatistics in the Harvard School of Public Health. His research deals with statistical imputation, Gibbs sampling, graphical models, genetics, image reconstructions, and other methods of biostatistics and bioinformatics. He holds a B.S. in mathematics from Peking University (1985) and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Chicago (1991). Dr. Liu began his career at Harvard in 1991, was at Stanford in 1994-2000, and returned to Harvard in 2000. His honors include selection as a Medallion lecturer of the Institute for Mathematical Statistics (IMS) in 2002; receipt of the 2002 COPSS Presidents’ Award, given annually by five leading statistical societies to a young individual for outstanding contributions to the profession of statistics; election as an IMS fellow in 2004; and selection as Bernoulli lecturer by the Bernoulli Society, 2004. He is the author of Monte Carlo Strategies in Scientific Computing (2001), has overseen 18 Ph.D. students, and has contributed to 18 software modules for computational biology.

Juan Maldacena is a theoretical physicist at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Among his many discoveries, the most famous is the AdS/CFT correspondence, the conjecture about the equivalence of string theory on Anti de Sitter (AdS) space and a conformal field theory defined on the boundary of the AdS space. Dr. Maldacena obtained his “licenciatura” (a 6-year degree) in 1991 from the Instituto Balseiro from the Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Bariloche, Argentina. He then obtained his Ph.D. at Princeton University in 1996 and went on to a postdoctoral position at Rutgers University. In 1997, he joined Harvard University as associate professor, being promoted to professor of physics in 1999. Since 2001 he has been a professor at the Institute for Advanced Study. He has the Edward A. Bouchet Award of the American Physical Society (2004), the Xanthopoulos International Award for Research in Gravitational Physics (2001), the Sackler Prize in Physics, a MacArthur fellowship in 1999, and the Dirac medal in 2008.

John W. Morgan is director of the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics at SUNY-Stony Brook. He received his B.A. and Ph.D. in mathematics from Rice University in 1968 and 1969, respectively. He was an instructor at Princeton University from 1969 to 1972 and an assistant professor at MIT from 1972 to 1974. He has been on the faculty at Columbia University since 1974. In July 2009, Dr. Morgan moved to Stony Brook University to become the first director of the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics. He has been

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
×

a visiting professor at Harvard University, Stanford University, the Université de Paris, MSRI, the Institute for Advanced Study, and the Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques. A member of the NAS, he is an editor of the Journal of the American Mathematical Society and Geometry and Topology.

Yuval Peres obtained his Ph.D. in 1990 from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, working under Hillel Furstenberg. In 1993, Dr. Peres joined the faculty of the statistics department at the University of California, Berkeley, where he served as a professor in the mathematics and statistics departments until moving recently to Microsoft Research to manage the Theory Group. Peres’s research encompasses a broad range of topics in theoretical probability. His research could be characterized as probability on infinite discrete structures where geometry plays a role. This includes, for instance, the study of random percolation on infinite Cayley graphs, where (in contrast to the usual d-dimensional lattice setting) one has the possibility of coexistence of infinitely many infinite components. Peres’s work illustrates and delineates active and exciting areas where probability meets other areas of pure mathematics.

Eva Tardos is the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University and was department chair 2006-2010. She received her B.A. and Ph.D. from Eötvös University in Budapest. She had a Humboldt fellowship at the University of Bonn, postdoctoral fellowships at MSRI and from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences at Eötvös University, and was a visiting professor at the Department of Mathematics at MIT in 1987-1989 before joining the faculty at Cornell. Dr. Tardos won the Fulkerson Prize, awarded jointly by the Mathematical Programming Society (MPS) and the AMS, and the Dantzig prize, awarded jointly by MPS and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). She was awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship (1991-1993), an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award (1991-1996), the David and Lucille Packard Foundation Fellowship in Science and Engineering (1990-1995), and a Guggenheim fellowship (1999-2000). She is a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), INFORMS, and SIAM, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the NAE. Dr. Tardos’s research interest is algorithms and algorithmic game theory, the subarea of computer science theory that involves designing systems and algorithms for selfish users. Her research focuses on algorithms and games on networks. She is most known for her work on network-flow algorithms, approximation algorithms, and quantifying the efficiency of selfish routing.

Margaret H. Wright is Silver Professor of Computer Science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, NYU. She received an M.S. and a Ph.D.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
×

in computer science and a B.S. in mathematics, all from Stanford University. Before joining NYU in 2001, she was a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff and Bell Labs fellow at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies. Her research interests include optimization, linear algebra, scientific computing, and real-world applications. She is the coauthor of two books, Practical Optimization and Numerical Linear Algebra and Optimization, and the author or coauthor of many research papers. She has chaired the Advisory Committee for the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Directorate at the NSF, and the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee for the U.S. Department of Energy; she has also served on several other committees for the NSF and the NRC. She is a member of the scientific advisory board of the DFG Research Center “Matheon” (Berlin) and of the Center for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (Sweden). A member of both the NAS and NAE, she recently chaired the 2010 International Review of Mathematical Sciences Research in the United Kingdom. Dr. Wright is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; she also received a doctorate in mathematics (honoris causa) from the University of Waterloo (Canada) and an honorary doctorate of technology from the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.

Joe B. Wyatt served as chancellor and CEO of Vanderbilt University from 1982 to 2000. During that time, he led Vanderbilt’s ascent into the top tier of U.S. teaching and research universities. He oversaw the expansion of the university’s academic offerings, the diversification of the student body, and the increase of Vanderbilt’s endowment from $170 million to more than $2 billion. Prior to joining Vanderbilt, Dr. Wyatt was a member of the faculty and administration at Harvard University, serving as vice president for administration from 1976 to 1982. During this period, he led EDUCOM, a consortium of 450 universities that developed computer networks and systems for sharing information and resources. In addition Dr. Wyatt co-authored the book Financial Planning Models for Colleges and Universities and wrote numerous papers and articles in the fields of technology, management, and education. Dr. Wyatt’s earlier career focused on computer science and systems, beginning at General Dynamics Corporation in 1956, and continuing at Symbiotics International, Inc., a company he co-founded in 1965. Mr. Wyatt was a co-founder, vice chairman of the board, and chairman of the Investment Committee for the Massachusetts Technology Development Corporation, a public/private venture capital group that has financed many successful technology-based companies in Massachusetts. He is currently chairman of the board of the Universities Research Association.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
×

Staff

Scott T. Weidman is the director of the National Research Council’s Board on Mathematical Sciences and Their Applications (BMSA). He joined the NRC in 1989 with the Board on Mathematical Sciences and moved to the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology in 1992. In 1996 he established a new board to conduct annual peer reviews of the Army Research Laboratory, which conducts a broad array of science, engineering, and human factors research and analysis, and he later directed a similar board that reviews the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Dr. Weidman has been full-time with the BMSA since mid-2004. During his NRC career, he has staffed studies on a wide variety of topics related to mathematical, chemical, and materials sciences, laboratory assessment, risk analysis, and science and technology policy. His current focus is on building up the NRC’s capabilities and portfolio related to all areas of analysis and computational science. He holds bachelor degrees in mathematics and materials science from Northwestern University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied mathematics from the University of Virginia. Prior to joining the NRC, he had positions with General Electric, General Accident Insurance Company, Exxon Research and Engineering, and MRJ, Inc.

Michelle Schwalbe is a program officer with the BMSA and the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems (BEES) within the National Research Council. She has been with the National Academies since 2010, when she participated in the Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program with BMSA. She then joined the Report Review Committee of the National Academies before re-joining BMSA and later joining BEES. With BMSA, she has worked on assignments relating to verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification; the future of mathematical science libraries; the mathematical sciences in 2025; and the Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. Her interests lie broadly in mathematics, statistics, and their many applications. She received a B.S. in applied mathematics specializing in computing from UCLA, an M.S. in applied mathematics from Northwestern University, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Northwestern University.

Thomas Arrison is a senior staff officer in the Policy and Global Affairs division of the National Academies. He joined the National Academies in 1990 and has directed a range of studies and other projects in areas such as international science and technology relations, innovation, information technology, higher education, and strengthening the U.S. research enterprise. He holds M.A.s in public policy and Asian studies from the University of Michigan.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2013. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/15269.
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The mathematical sciences are part of nearly all aspects of everyday life--the discipline has underpinned such beneficial modern capabilities as Internet search, medical imaging, computer animation, numerical weather predictions, and all types of digital communications. The Mathematical Sciences in 2025 examines the current state of the mathematical sciences and explores the changes needed for the discipline to be in a strong position and able to maximize its contribution to the nation in 2025. It finds the vitality of the discipline excellent and that it contributes in expanding ways to most areas of science and engineering, as well as to the nation as a whole, and recommends that training for future generations of mathematical scientists should be re-assessed in light of the increasingly cross-disciplinary nature of the mathematical sciences. In addition, because of the valuable interplay between ideas and people from all parts of the mathematical sciences, the report emphasizes that universities and the government need to continue to invest in the full spectrum of the mathematical sciences in order for the whole enterprise to continue to flourish long-term.

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