National Academies Press: OpenBook

Discovering the Brain (1992)

Chapter: Acknowledgments

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Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences. 1992. Discovering the Brain. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1785.
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Acknowledgments

This book was triggered by the July 1990 symposium that was organized by the Institute of Medicine to initiate the Decade of the Brain. The speakers listed below participated in the meeting and graciously cooperated during the preparation of the book:

* Huda Akil, Mental Health Research Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Duane Alexander, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

Floyd E. Bloom, Department of Neuropharmacology, Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, California

D. Allan Bromley, Executive Office of the President, Washington, D.C.

Barbara Bush, Washington, D.C.

Silvio Conte (deceased), United States House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

** W. Maxwell Cowan, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences. 1992. Discovering the Brain. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1785.
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Pete V. Domenici, United States Senate, Washington, D.C.

* Patricia Goldman-Rakic, Department of Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut

Murray Goldstein, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

Frederick K. Goodwin, Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, Rockville, Maryland

Enoch Gordis, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, Rockville, Maryland

Alberto Grignolo, FIDIA Pharmaceuticals, Washington, D.C.

Roger Guillemin, Whittier Institute, La Jolla, California

David H. Hubel, Department of Neurobiology, Harvard University Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

Lily Yeh Jan, Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco

Richard T. Johnson, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

Lewis L. Judd, National Institute of Mental Health, Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, Rockville, Maryland

Eric R. Kandel, Center for Neurobiology and Behavior, Columbia University, New York, New York

Carl Kupfer, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

Thomas W. Langfitt, The Glenmede Trust Company and The Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Robert Lefkowitz, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

Alan I. Leshner, National Institute of Mental Health, Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, Rockville, Maryland

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences. 1992. Discovering the Brain. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1785.
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David T. Mahoney, David Mahoney Ventures, New York, New York

Joseph B. Martin, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco

James O. Mason, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C.

Guy M. McKhann, Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland

Vernon B. Mountcastle, Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

Michael I. Posner, Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene

* Dominick P. Purpura, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York

* Marcus E. Raichle, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri

Pasko Rakic, Section of Neuroanatomy, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut

* Lewis P. Rowland, Department of Neurology, College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York

Charles R. Schuster, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, Rockville, Maryland

Terrence J. Sejnowski, Computational Neurobiology Laboratory, Salk Institute, San Diego, California

* Solomon H. Snyder, Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

Louis W. Sullivan, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C.

James D. Watson, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York

T. Franklin Williams, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

* Member, Steering Committee

** Chair, Steering Committee

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences. 1992. Discovering the Brain. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1785.
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Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences. 1992. Discovering the Brain. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1785.
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Page 161
Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences. 1992. Discovering the Brain. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1785.
×
Page 162
Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences. 1992. Discovering the Brain. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1785.
×
Page 163
Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences. 1992. Discovering the Brain. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1785.
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Page 164
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Discovering the Brain Get This Book
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The brain ...

There is no other part of the human anatomy that is so intriguing. How does it develop and function and why does it sometimes, tragically, degenerate?

The answers are complex. In Discovering the Brain, science writer Sandra Ackerman cuts through the complexity to bring this vital topic to the public.

The 1990s were declared the "Decade of the Brain" by former President Bush, and the neuroscience community responded with a host of new investigations and conferences. Discovering the Brain is based on the Institute of Medicine conference, Decade of the Brain: Frontiers in Neuroscience and Brain Research.

Discovering the Brain is a "field guide" to the brain—an easy-to-read discussion of the brain's physical structure and where functions such as language and music appreciation lie. Ackerman examines:

  • How electrical and chemical signals are conveyed in the brain.
  • The mechanisms by which we see, hear, think, and pay attention—and how a "gut feeling" actually originates in the brain.
  • Learning and memory retention, including parallels to computer memory and what they might tell us about our own mental capacity.
  • Development of the brain throughout the life span, with a look at the aging brain.

Ackerman provides an enlightening chapter on the connection between the brain's physical condition and various mental disorders and notes what progress can realistically be made toward the prevention and treatment of stroke and other ailments.

Finally, she explores the potential for major advances during the "Decade of the Brain," with a look at medical imaging techniques—what various technologies can and cannot tell us—and how the public and private sectors can contribute to continued advances in neuroscience.

This highly readable volume will provide the public and policymakers—and many scientists as well—with a helpful guide to understanding the many discoveries that are sure to be announced throughout the "Decade of the Brain."

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