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Suggested Citation:"INDEX." National Research Council. 1992. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1806.
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INDEX

Suggested Citation:"INDEX." National Research Council. 1992. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1806.
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Suggested Citation:"INDEX." National Research Council. 1992. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1806.
×

INDEX

A

Active noise control, 44

Air/fuel ratio, 34, 69, 76

Air Quality Act of 1967, 71

Antilock brakes, 58, 59

Automobile consumers, 9-10, 107-120

age and buying preferences, 116-117, 119-120

and fuel economy, 9-10, 27, 111-112, 117-119, 120, 156-159, 170

and fuel prices, 119, 120

and future price increases, 110-111

demand for optional equipment/performance, 110, 117-118, 119

fuel economy/fuel price trade offs, 112-114, 118

mix of automotive purchases, 9, 114

new-car expenditures, 107-111

Automotive industry (U.S.), 8-9, 26, 90-105

capacity for investment, 9, 100-102

employment in, 8, 94-97, 105

financial performance, 91-93, 104

impact of competition, 8, 91-92, 93-102, 105

impact of emissions standards, 94 (note 7), 100, 104

impact of fuel economy standards, 90, 91, 100-102, 159-162

impact of international fuel prices, 103, 105

Japanese transplants, 91, 96-97

plant closings, 94, 95

product development, U.S. vs. Japanese, 98-100, 102, 105

Automotive market, 107-111

new-car expenditures, 107, 109

sales and scrappage, 107-108, 110

Auto/Oil Air Quality Improvement Research Program, 80, 81

C

Car sales by size class, 18, 22

Catalyst systems

heated, 79

NOx, 43, 75, 77-78, 85

three-way, 43, 70, 75, 76-77

Charge to the committee, 1

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), 71

Clean Air Act amendments, 69, 71, 72-75

Concept vehicles, 45, 222-225

see also, prototype vehicles

Corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) system

alternatives/supplements to, 10-11, 173-180, 185-186, 187

fees and rebates, 11, 179-180, 186

increased fuel prices, 11, 173-178, 186

current system, 12, 168-173, 183 (note 28)

strengths, 172-173

weaknesses, 10, 169-172, 186

percentage improvement approach, 10, 181, 187

potential modifications to, 11, 180-185, 186-187

vehicle attribute approach, 181-182

D

Diesel engine 33, 219-221

Downsizing/downweighting, 39, 62, 63

estimates of safety impact, 5-6, 51-55, 62, 63

GAO study, 54-55

need for further study, 63

NHTSA study, 53

OTA study, 55

E

Emissions, 26

data on, 71, 78, 82

health effects, 70, 85

impact on global warming, 70

nature of, 69-72

Emissions control, 7-8, 71-85

costs, 159

during refueling, 70, 80, 85

hydrocarbons, 79

impact on fuel economy, 7-8, 75-82, 105, 164

indirect impacts, 84

meeting future standards, 7-8, 82-83, 84-85

NOx, 76-79

on-board fuel recovery, 70, 80

standards, 72-75, 76

stationary sources, 78, 82

surveillance, 83, 85

Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA)

fuel economy projections, 123, 124, 145, 154, 232

fuel economy technologies, 40, 137-139, 196, 197, 200-214

Suggested Citation:"INDEX." National Research Council. 1992. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1806.
×

Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 12

Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), 44, 77

Externalities, 25, 118

F

Fatal Accident Reporting System (FARS), 54 (note 7), 55-56

Fatality rates, 47

by crash type, 50

trends in, 47, 62

Fatality risk, 56

and crash severity, 49-50

and design compatibility, 51, 59

and ride-down distances, 50

and rollover stability, 5-6, 48-49, 58, 59, 62

Federal Test Procedure (FTP), 30

highway cycle, 37

operating conditions, 31, 37

urban cycle, 37

Fuel

chemical energy in, 31, 32, 35, 36

consumption, 22, 163

prices, 17, 112-114, 173-178

cost-benefits of reduced consumption, 23-25

Fuel economy

and emissions control, 7-8, 75-82, 84-85

and safety standards, 59, 63

determinants, 32-40

Japanese interest in, 90

technologies, 3-5, 7, 40-45

emerging 3-5, 43-45

proven, 3-5, 40-43

trends, 13-22

U.S. vs. Japanese cars, 90

Fuel economy estimates

caveats, 2, 149-150, 164-165

practically achievable, 1, 154-165

cost-benefit consideration, 154-156, 157

costs-benefits for consumers, 156-159

costs-benefits for manufacturers, 159-162

costs-benefits for nation, 163

technically achievable, 1-3, 150-154

Fuel economy projections, 122-146

committee projections, 126-144, 146

alternative methods, 125, 146

assumptions, 125-126

best-in-class projections, 131-135, 146

caveats, 144, 145

historical trend projections, 126-131

Fuel economy projections

committee projections (continued)

technology-penetration projections (shopping cart), 133-144, 146

costs involved, 138, 139-144

previous efforts, 122-125

G

Greenhouses gases, 70, 71

carbon dioxide emissions 24, 104, 156, 163

L

Lean-burn engines, 43, 217-221

Light trucks

sales by size class, 22

standards for, 57-58, 183

M

Mix shifting, 154, 171, 177

and safety, 48, 51, 57

Model year, defined, 12 (note 4)

Multipoint fuel injection, 39, 42

N

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 53, 58

and light trucks, 59

and rollover stability, 59

New Car Assessment Program (NCAP), 58 (note 16)

P

Performance

and fuel economy, 37

passenger cars, 20

Policy coordination and analysis, 8, 165-166

data collection to support, 5

Prototype vehicles, 45, 222-225

see also, concept vehicles

S

Safety, 5-7, 26, 47-63

and fuel economy, 5-7, 59, 60-61, 62, 63, 163

and shift to light trucks, 55, 57-58

and societal values, 7, 61-62, 63

cost of future safety standards, 159

data issues, 55-56

improvements, 7, 58-61, 63

individual vs. societal risk, 56-57, 227-231

standards, 58, 59

see also, downsizing/downweighting, fatality rates, fatality risks

Size class definition, 18 (note 9)

Suggested Citation:"INDEX." National Research Council. 1992. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1806.
×

SRI International

fuel economy projections, 123, 124, 234

fuel economy technologies, 40, 137-139, 196, 197, 200-214

T

Technology forecasting, 26

Time frame of study, 2, 9

Turbo/supercharging, 38

Two-stroke engines, 7, 44, 221-222

V

VTEC engine, 38, 205-206, 219

Suggested Citation:"INDEX." National Research Council. 1992. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1806.
×
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Suggested Citation:"INDEX." National Research Council. 1992. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1806.
×
Page 256
Suggested Citation:"INDEX." National Research Council. 1992. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1806.
×
Page 257
Suggested Citation:"INDEX." National Research Council. 1992. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1806.
×
Page 258
Suggested Citation:"INDEX." National Research Council. 1992. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1806.
×
Page 259
Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go? Get This Book
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This volume presents realistic estimates for the level of fuel economy that is achievable in the next decade for cars and light trucks made in the United States and Canada.

A source of objective and comprehensive information on the topic, this book takes into account real-world factors such as the financial conditions in the automotive industry, costs and benefits to consumers, and marketability of high-efficiency vehicles.

The committee is composed of experts from the fields of science, technology, finance, and regulation and offers practical evaluations of technological improvements that could contribute to increased fuel efficiency. The volume also examines potential barriers to improvement, such as high production costs, regulations on safety and emissions, and consumer preferences.

This practical book is of considerable interest to car and light truck manufacturers, policymakers, federal and state agencies, and the public.

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