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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2013. Benefits, Burdens, and Prospects of the American Community Survey: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18259.
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References

Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans (2012). State of the Asian Pacific Minnesotans. St. Paul, MN: Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans. Accessed: http://www.capm.state.mn.us/pub_demo.html [August 2012].

Herriot, R., D. Bateman, and W. F. McCarthy (1989). The Decade Census Program—A new approach for meeting the nation’s needs for sub-national data. In Proceedings of the Social Statistics Section, American Statistical Association, pp. 351–355. Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association.

Joyce, P. M., D. Malec, R. J. A. Little, and A. Gilary (2012). Statistical Modeling Methodology for the Voting Rights Act Section 203 Language Assistance Determinations. Revised from January 24, 2012, original. Research Report Series, Statistics #2012-02. Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau. Accessed: www.census.gov/srd/papers/pdf/rrs2012-02.pdf [August 2012].

National Cooperative Highway Research Program (2007). A Guidebook for Using American Community Survey Data for Transportation Planning. NCHRP Report 588. Washington, DC: Transportation Research Board.

National Cooperative Highway Research Program(2011, August). Producing Transportation Data Products from the American Community Survey That Comply with Disclosure Rules. NCHRP Web-Only Document 180; contractor’s final report for NCHRP Project 08-79. Washington, DC: Transportation Research Board.

National Research Council (1995). Measuring Poverty: A New Approach. Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance: Concepts, Information Needs, and Measurement Methods, Constance F. Citro and Robert T. Michael, eds., Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council (2006). Once, Only Once, and in the Right Place: Residence Rules in the Decennial Census. Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, Daniel L. Cork and Paul R. Voss, eds., Committee on National Statistics, Division

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2013. Benefits, Burdens, and Prospects of the American Community Survey: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18259.
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      of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council (2007a). Tools and Methods for Estimating Population at Risk from Natural Disasters and Complex Humanitarian Crises. Committee on the Effective Use of Data, Methodologies, and Technologies to Estimate Subnational Populations at Risk. Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, Division on Earth and Life Studies, and Committee on Population, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council (2007b). Using the American Community Survey: Benefits and Challenges. Panel on the Functionality and Usability of Data from the American Community Survey. Constance F. Citro and Graham Kalton, eds., Committee on National Statistics, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

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New York City Center for Economic Opportunity (2012, April). The CEO Poverty Measure, 2005–2010. Working Paper. New York City: New York City Center for Economic Opportunity. Accessed: http://www.nyc.gov/html/ceo/downloads/pdf/CEO_Poverty_Measure_April_16.pdf [July 2012].

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2013. Benefits, Burdens, and Prospects of the American Community Survey: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18259.
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U.S. Census Bureau (2006, October). Design and Methodology. Current Population Survey Technical Paper 66. Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau.

U.S. Census Bureau (2008a, November). A Compass for Understanding and Using American Community Survey Data: What Congress Needs to Know. Drafted by Terri Ann Lowenthal and Mary Jo Hoeksema. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. U.S. Census Bureau (2008b, December). A Compass for Understanding and Using American Community Survey Data: What High School Teachers Need to Know. Drafted by William P. O’Hare, Linda A. Jacobsen, and Mark Mather. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2013. Benefits, Burdens, and Prospects of the American Community Survey: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18259.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2013. Benefits, Burdens, and Prospects of the American Community Survey: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18259.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2013. Benefits, Burdens, and Prospects of the American Community Survey: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18259.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2013. Benefits, Burdens, and Prospects of the American Community Survey: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18259.
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Page 169
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2013. Benefits, Burdens, and Prospects of the American Community Survey: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18259.
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In June 2012, the Committee on National Statistics (sponsored by the U.S. Census Bureau) convened a Workshop on the Benefits (and Burdens) of the American Community Survey (ACS)---the detailed demographic and economic survey that began full-scale data collection in 2005 and that replaced the traditional "long form" in the 2010 census. ACS data are used by numerous federal agencies to administer programs, yet the ACS only moved from abstraction to reality for most users in 2010, when the first ACS estimates for small areas (based on 5 years of collected data) were made available. Hence, the workshop marked the opportunity to develop a picture of the breadth of the nonfederal user base of the ACS---among them, the media, policy research and evaluation groups (that distill ACS results for the media and broader public), state and local agencies, businesses and economic development organizations, and local and regional planning authorities---and to gather information on users' experiences with the first full releases of ACS products.

In addition to covering innovative uses of the information now available on a continuous basis in the ACS, the workshop gave expression to the challenges and burdens associated with the survey: the time burden places on respondents, the challenges of explaining and interpreting estimates with increased levels of variability, and the privacy and confidentiality implications of some of the ACS content. Benefits, Burdens, and Prospects of the American Community Survey: Summary of a Workshop provides a factual summary of the workshop proceedings and hints at the contours of the ACS user constituency, providing important input to the ongoing review and refinement of the ACS program.

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