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Suggested Citation:"List of Podcast Tutorials." National Research Council. 2013. The Informed Brain in a Digital World: Interdisciplinary Research Team Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18268.
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List of The Informed Brain in a Digital World Podcast Tutorials

The Effects of the Digital Age on Education
Podcast Released: September 13, 2012
Michael Keller
Ida M. Green University Librarian
Director of Academic Resources Stanford University

The Trajectory, Value, and Risk of Extreme Life Logging
Podcast Released: September 20, 2012
Cathal Gurrin
SFI Stokes Lecturer School of Computing
University of Ireland, Dublin City

The Impact of the Internet on the Social Behavior
Podcast Released: September 27, 2012
Robert Kraut
Herbert A. Simon Professor of Human-Computer Interaction
Human-Computer Interaction Institute
Carnegie Mellon University

Suggested Citation:"List of Podcast Tutorials." National Research Council. 2013. The Informed Brain in a Digital World: Interdisciplinary Research Team Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18268.
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Differences in Cognitive and Brain Function of Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants
Podcast Released: October 2, 2012
Clifford Nass
Thomas M. Storke Professor of Communication
Stanford University

The Effects of the Digital Age on Health and Wellness
Podcast Released: October 11, 2012
Larry Smarr
Director, Calit2
University of California, San Diego

The Brain-Computer Interface
Podcast Released: October 17, 2012
Scott Grafton
Professor
Psychological & Brain Sciences
University of California, Santa Barbara

All tutorials are available at www.keckfutures.org.

Suggested Citation:"List of Podcast Tutorials." National Research Council. 2013. The Informed Brain in a Digital World: Interdisciplinary Research Team Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18268.
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Page 99
Suggested Citation:"List of Podcast Tutorials." National Research Council. 2013. The Informed Brain in a Digital World: Interdisciplinary Research Team Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18268.
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The Informed Brain in a Digital World: Interdisciplinary Research Team Summaries Get This Book
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Digital media provide humans with more access to information than ever before—a computer, tablet, or smartphone can all be used to access data online and users frequently have more than one device. However, as humans continue to venture into the digital frontier, it remains to be known whether access to seemingly unlimited information is actually helping us learn and solve complex problems, or ultimately creating more difficulty and confusion for individuals and societies by offering content overload that is not always meaningful.

Throughout history, technology has changed the way humans interact with the world. Improvements in tools, language, industrial machines, and now digital information technology have shaped our minds and societies. There has always been access to more information than humans can handle, but the difference now lies in the ubiquity of the Internet and digital technology, and the incredible speed with which anyone with a computer can access and participate in seemingly infinite information exchange. Humans now live in a world where mobile digital technology is everywhere, from the classroom and the doctor's office to public transportation and even the dinner table. This paradigm shift in technology comes with tremendous benefits and risks. Interdisciplinary Research (IDR) Teams at the 2012 National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference on The Informed Brain in the Digital World explored common rewards and dangers to Humans among various fields that are being greatly impacted by the Internet and the rapid evolution of digital technology.

Keynote speaker Clifford Nass of Stanford University opened the dialogue by offering insight into what we already know about how the "information overload" of the digital world may be affecting our brains. Nass presented the idea of the "media budget," which states that when a new media emerges, it takes time away from other media in a daily time budget. When additional media appear and there is no time left in a person's daily media budget, people begin to "double book" media time. Personal computers, tablets, and smartphones make it easy to use several media simultaneously, and according to Nass, this double-booking of media can result in chronic multitasking, which effects how people store and manage memory. Although current fast-paced work and learning environments often encourage multitasking, research shows that such multitasking is inefficient, decreases productivity, and may hinder cognitive function. National Academies Keck Future Initiative: The Informed Brain in a Digital World summarizes the happenings of this conference.

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