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Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence (2013)

Chapter: Appendix C: Open Session Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18311.
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Appendix C

Open Session Agendas

Tuesday December 4, 2012

OPEN SESSION

3:00 p.m. Presentations by CDC Representatives
Robert K. Merritt
Mary Cogswell
Janelle Gunn

A WORKSHOP ON PERSPECTIVES ON
DIETARY SODIUM AND HEALTH
December 5, 2012

National Academy of Sciences
2101 Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20418
Room 125

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

8:00 a.m. Registration
 
8:25 Welcome
BRIAN STROM, Committee Chair
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18311.
×
 
Session 1 – Government Efforts Concerning Sodium Intake
 
8:30 Session 1 Introduction
Moderator: BRIAN STROM
 
8:35 Current CDC Efforts Concerning Sodium Intake
ROBERT K. MERRITT, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 
Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in Adults: The Lifestyle Workgroup Background and Methods
JANET DE JESUS,
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
 
FDA’s Activities in Sodium Reduction
JEREMIAH FASANO,
Food and Drug Administration
 
9:10 Questions for Session 1 Speakers
 
Session 2 – Setting the Stage for Examining Sodium Intake in Populations
 
9:20 Session 2 Introduction
Moderator: JOE IX
 
9:25 Salt Sensitivity: Mechanisms, Diagnosis, and Clinical Relevance
MATT WEIR, University of Maryland
 
9:50 Methodological Considerations to Assess Dietary Sodium Intake in the Population Using What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)
ALANA MOSHFEGH, USDA Agricultural Research Service
 
10:25 Sodium Reduction Initiatives in the Americas
BRANKA LEGETIC, Pan American Health Organization
 
10:50 Questions for Session 2 Speakers
 
11:10 Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18311.
×
 
Session 3 – Approaches to Reviewing Evidence
 
11:25 Session 3 Introduction
Moderator: ALICE LICHTENSTEIN
 
11:30 Lesson Learned on Conducting Nutrition Systematic Reviews
JOSEPH LAU,
Brown University
 
11:50 Questions for Session 3 Speakers
 
12:00 p.m. Lunch
 
Session 4 – Health Effects Associated with Lowering Sodium Intake in the Population
 
1:00 Session 4 Introduction
Moderator: KIRSTEN BIBBINS-DOMINGO
 
1:05 Low Versus Moderate Sodium Intake to Reduce Cardiovascular Events
MARTIN O’DONNELL, McMaster University, Canada National University of Ireland, Dublin
 
1:30 Dietary Sodium and Cardiovascular Outcomes: The Evidence
MICHAEL H. ALDERMAN, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
 
1:55 A Review of Heath Benefits of Lowering Sodium Intake in the United States
LAWRENCE APPEL, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
 
2:20 Importance of Mineral Interactions in Heart and Bone Health: Sodium, Potassium, Calcium, and Magnesium
CONNIE WEAVER, Purdue University
 
2:45 The Pleiotropic Effects of Dietary Sodium
MERLIN THOMAS, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute
 
3:10 Balancing the Evidence Regarding Sodium and Health
SALIM YUSUF, McMaster University, Canada
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18311.
×
 
3:35 Sodium Intake’s Physiological Range: Perturbation’s Pathological Consequences
DAVID MCCARRON, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis
 
4:00 Questions for Session 4 Speakers
 
Session 5 – Public Comments and Review of the Day
 
4:30 Public Comments (5 minutes each)
Moderator: BRIAN STROM
 
5:30 Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18311.
×
Page 137
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18311.
×
Page 138
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18311.
×
Page 139
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18311.
×
Page 140
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Despite efforts over the past several decades to reduce sodium intake in the United States, adults still consume an average of 3,400 mg of sodium every day. A number of scientific bodies and professional health organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association, support reducing dietary sodium intake. These organizations support a common goal to reduce daily sodium intake to less than 2,300 milligrams and further reduce intake to 1,500 mg among persons who are 51 years of age and older and those of any age who are African-American or have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease.

A substantial body of evidence supports these efforts to reduce sodium intake. This evidence links excessive dietary sodium to high blood pressure, a surrogate marker for cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke, and cardiac-related mortality. However, concerns have been raised that a low sodium intake may adversely affect certain risk factors, including blood lipids and insulin resistance, and thus potentially increase risk of heart disease and stroke. In fact, several recent reports have challenged sodium reduction in the population as a strategy to reduce this risk.

Sodium Intake in Populations recognizes the limitations of the available evidence, and explains that there is no consistent evidence to support an association between sodium intake and either a beneficial or adverse effect on most direct health outcomes other than some CVD outcomes (including stroke and CVD mortality) and all-cause mortality. Some evidence suggested that decreasing sodium intake could possibly reduce the risk of gastric cancer. However, the evidence was too limited to conclude the converse—that higher sodium intake could possibly increase the risk of gastric cancer. Interpreting these findings was particularly challenging because most studies were conducted outside the United States in populations consuming much higher levels of sodium than those consumed in this country. Sodium Intake in Populations is a summary of the findings and conclusions on evidence for associations between sodium intake and risk of CVD-related events and mortality.

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