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Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School (2013)

Chapter: Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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C

State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity

Table C-1 provides a summary of data extracted from the National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) State School Health Policy Database, which is a comprehensive set of laws and policies from all 50 states on more than 40 school health topics. The database can be found at http://www.nasbe.org/healthy_schools/hs. Begun in 1998 and continuously updated, the NASBE database is another data source that supplements the School Health Policies and Practices Study survey by providing supplemental information on the presence of relevant state laws and policies. The NASBE database provides a summary description of the actual state-level laws, legal codes, rules, regulations, administrative orders, mandates, standards, and resolutions. It includes a summary of the most recent state-level laws and regulations but does not provide historical information on laws that were in place dating back to 1998.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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TABLE C-1 Summary of State Laws and Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity

State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Alabama Code 16-40-1; Administrative Code 290-3-1-02. Requires physical education for students in grades K-8. A minimum daily instructional period of at least 30 minutes is required in grades 1-6. The physical education may include dance class if taught at a magnet school, marching band, JROTC, or other activity as approved by a student’s individualized education program. For grades K-8, no exemptions and no substitutions. The Alabama Course of Study: Physical Education (2009) specifies the required grades K-12 content standards for physical education and is based on the National Standards for Physical Education. Administrative Code 290-2-3 (1997) requires schools to purchase from the list of Health and Physical Education Textbooks Adopted by the Alabama State Board of Education unless another textbook is recommended by the local textbook committee, recommended by the local superintendent, and adopted by the local board of education. The Alabama Department of Education requires a yearly student physical fitness assessment for all students in grades K-12 in physical education. Schools use the President’s Challenge Physical Fitness Test and are required to report the results to the state Department of Education only for odd-numbered years. The minimum requirement for prospective physical education teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor’s degree and completion of a state-approved teacher education program in physical education.

Alaska 04 AAC 06.075 (2005) Physical education is not a required course for students. No state policy. Curriculum Content: Physical Education Content Standards (2010) provide outline objectives for grades K-12. No state policy. No state policy.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
One credit of physical education. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. Each school conducts surve

One credit of either health or physical education. No state policy. Equal opportunity. No state policy. State provides guidance.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Arizona Mandate: State Board of Education Administrative Code R7-2-301 (1993) establishes the minimum course of study and competency goals. Does not specify grades, levels, or a minimum amount of instruction. Exemptions: Arizona Revised Statute 15-102 (no date available) allows for parents to withdraw a child from an activity, class, or program if they object to any activity or learning material. The state adopted the Physical Education Standards (2009), which includes the rationale, standards, and major content areas for physical education. No state policy. The Special Subject Area Endorsement (2008) requires a valid elementary, secondary, or special education certificate, 30 hours of courses to include one course in the methods of teaching physical education at the elementary level, one course for the secondary level, and either 24 semester hours of courses in physical education, content areas, a master’s degree in physical education, or a comparable certificate from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
No state policy. No state policy. Arizona Revised Statute 15-705 (no date available) requires each governing board to adopt policies and procedures including minimum statewide requirements regarding participation in extracurricular activities for pupils in grades 6-12. No state policy. The Department of Education has a step-by-step guide designed to walk schools through the process of creating a wellness policy.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Arkansas Act 317; Code 20-7-135 Mandate: Act 317 (2007) requires 60 minutes per calendar week of physical education training and instruction for students in grades K-6 and for grades 5-8 for schools organized to teach these grades.

The statute requires 90 minutes of additional physical activity per week for grades K-6, which may include physical education in addition to the previous requirement, daily recess, or intramural sports.

The Rules Governing Nutrition and Physical Activity Standards allow local districts to require physical education or activity in excess of these requirements.

Arkansas Public Schools (2009) details the course requirements for students: in grades K-8 all students must receive instruction in physical education (the amount is not specified).
Code 6-16-132 (2003) waivers only for medical or religious reasons. Arkansas has not formally adopted state standards for physical education; however, the state does require schools to follow the K-8 Physical Education and Health Curriculum Framework and Physical Education and Curriculum Framework for Grades 9-12 (2005). The Department of Education requires students to participate in a “national recognized health-fitness assessment for the purpose of setting age-appropriate personal goals” along with improvement in various physical areas. Code 6-16-132 (2003) does not require schools or districts to hire personnel certified in physical education. However, minimum requirements are a bachelor’s degree and passing scores on the appropriate Praxis content knowledge exam.

The State Board of Education’s Rules Governing Nutrition and Physical Activity Standards (2007) require districts to employ at least one licensed and/ or qualified full-time physical education teacher for every 500 students in grades K-6.

Since 2012, all personnel teaching physical education in grades K-12 must hold a physical education license appropriate for the grade levels being taught.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
One-half unit course of physical education. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. Act 1220 of 2003 (Codes 6-7-117 through 6-7-119) predates Section 204 and is generally stronger than the federal requirements.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
California Concurrent Resolution 31; Education Codes 33350, 51210, 51210-1, 51222, 51223, 51225-3

Education Code 51210 (no date available) requires 200 minutes of physical education to be included in the adopted course of study for grades 1-6.

Education Code 51222 requires a minimum of 400 minutes of physical education instruction every 10 school days for students in grades 7-12.

Education Code 51225.3 (2000) does not allow a student to receive a high school diploma without completion of two courses in physical education, unless an exemption was made.
Education Code 51241 (2007) permits a school district to exempt a student if the pupil is ill or injured and a modified program to meet the needs of the pupil cannot be provided or enrolled for one-half, or less, of the work normally required of full-time pupils.

Exemptions from physical education courses may be granted to pupils for 2 years at any time during grades 10-12, inclusive, if the pupil has met satisfactorily any five of the six standards of the physical performance test administered in grade 9 pursuant to Section 60800.

Education Code 51242 (1976) states that students who participate in school-sponsored interscholastic athletic programs may be exempted from courses in physical education.
Education Code 60605.2 (2001): The State Board of Education adopted Physical Education Model Content Standards for California Public Schools (2005). However, the education code does not require schools to follow the standards. California Code of Regulations Title 5, Division 1, Chapter 10, Subchapter 1, Article 3.1, 10060, requires each high school student to be evaluated on his or her progress in each of the following content areas: the effect of physical activity on dynamic health, mechanics of body movement, aquatics, gymnastics and tumbling, individual and dual sports, rhythms and dance, team sports, and combatives. Education Code 51210.2 (2002) encourages each school district to employ a credentialed physical education teacher within any elementary school and to provide each teacher instruction in physical education with yearly theoretical practical training in developmental physical education.

Education Code 44257 (1993) requires the commission to issue single-subject teaching credentials in physical education.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
Two courses in physical education. Not required, but daily recess is encouraged. Education Code 33350 (1976) encourages districts to provide extracurricular physical activity. The education code also establishes the California Department of Education as the authority over interscholastic athletics. Streets and Highways Code 2333.5 (1999) requires the California Department of Transportation, in conjunction with California Highway Patrol, to establish and administer a Safe Routes to School program. Guidance for the Development of California School Wellness Policies (2005), developed in a collaborative effort between the Department of Education and other organizations, provides districts with suggestions and concrete recommendations for meeting Section 204 requirements (Project LEAN and Healthy Children Ready to Learn).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Colorado House Bill 11-1069 (2011) requires each school district board of education to adopt a policy that incorporates a minimum number of minutes of physical activity each month, or each day if the school meets less than 5 days per week, into each elementary school student’s schedule.

The requirement for students who attend 5 days per week for a full day is 600 minutes per month.
No state policy. The Comprehensive Health and Physical Education Standards (2009) provide standards and a suggested curriculum framework for physical education. No state policy. Bachelor’s degree in the liberal arts, with additional coursework in physical education.

High school physical education teachers are required to have a bachelor’s degree in physical education, as outlined in State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-8.16 2004).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. Statute 43-1-1601 (2004) requires the Department of Transportation to establish and administer a Safe Routes to School program to distribute federal funds to improve pedestrian and bicyclist safety in school areas. No state policy.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Connecticut Chapter 164 Section 10-16b, Chapter 170 Section 10-221o, and Chapter 170 Section 10-221a. Statute Chapter 164 Sec. 10-16b (1997) requires that students in public schools receive physical education instruction. Statute Chapter 170 Section 10-221o of the Connecticut General Statutes (2004) requires each local board of education to include in a regular K-5 school day a period of physical exercise, with the exception of those students requiring special education and related services. The Action Guide for School Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies (2009) provides guidelines and policy recommendations to local districts for physical education, along with other areas. Statute Chapter 170 Section 10-221a allows for medical exemption. No state policy. Physical Fitness Assessment: All students in grades 4, 6, 8, and 10 participating in physical education are required to complete a physical fitness assessment.

Fitness assessment data are to be reported to the Connecticut State Department of Education annually for inclusion in each school district’s Strategic School Profile.
Bachelor’s degree with a major in physical education.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
One credit of physical education. While not specifying “recess,” Chapter 170 Section 10-221 (2003) requires each local board to include a period of physical exercise in the regular school day for students in grades K-5. No state policy. No state policy. State provides guidance.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Delaware Administrative Code 14:505 (2004) and Administrative Code 14:503 (2005).

Administrative Code 14:503 (2005) requires students in grades 1-8 to be enrolled in a physical education program.
Administrative Code 14:503 allows the physical education requirements to be waived only for students who have an excuse from a qualified physician or objections based on religious beliefs. The Delaware Recommended Curriculum and Delaware Standards for Physical Education are aligned with and reflect the NASPE-approved National Standards for Physical Education for all students in grades K-12. Code 14:122(b) (2006) requires each school district to assess the physical fitness of each student at least once at the appropriate elementary, middle, and high school level, with the results to be provided to the parent, guardian, or relative caregiver.

Code 14:122(b) (2006) also provides for the fitness assessments to be administered at common grade levels statewide.
The minimum requirements for licensure as a physical educator are a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university, completion of a teacher preparation program in physical education for grades K-12, and completion of a minimum of 27 semester hours in physical education coursework.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
One credit of physical education. No state policy. Administrative Code 14:1001 (2002) states “local school districts shall establish their own academic eligibility criteria for participation in extra-curricular activities for all extra-curricular activities except for interscholastic athletics,” which are defined in Administrative Codes 14:1008 and 14:1009 (2004). Administrative Code 10:17 (2002) authorizes the Department of Transportation to establish and administer a Safe Routes to School program. State provides guidance.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Florida Statute 1003.455 (2007) requires 150 minutes of physical education each week for students in grades K-5. This was expanded in 2008 to include the requirement for students in grade 6 who are enrolled in a school that contains one or more elementary grades. It requires instruction to be at least 30 consecutive minutes on any day that physical education instruction is given.

Beginning with the 2009-2010 school year, students in grades 6-8 were required to complete the equivalent of one class period per day of physical education for one semester of each school year.
Waivers are permitted for certain conditions for high school, which include JROTC, marching band, and interscholastics with specified requirements. Grades K-8 can be waived for special requirements. The Next Generation Sunshine State Standards for Physical Education (2008), which are based on the National Standards for Physical Education, describe the state’s learning expectations for grades K-12.

The state does not provide or recommend particular curriculum materials.
No state policy. For certification in K-12 physical education, Rule 6A-4.0283 (2003) requires a bachelor’s degree or higher with either a teacher education major in physical education or 30 semester hours in physical education that includes areas specified in the rule.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
Statute 1003.428 requires one credit in physical education to include integration of health beginning with students entering their first year of high school in the 2007-2008 school year. No state policy. Statute 1000.05 (2004) prohibits the exclusion; requires equal athletic opportunities for both genders. Statute 1002.20 (2004) mandates that all students first enrolling in a school be eligible; specifies academic and conduct requirements. Statute 335.066 (2002) establishes the Safe Paths to Schools program in the Department of Transportation. Statute 18.1003.453 (2006) requires every school district to review its school wellness policy annually.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Georgia Georgia Codes 20-2-142, 20-2-776 (2009), and 20-2-142; State Board of Education Rules 160-4-2-.12 (2011) and 160-4-2-.47 (2002).

Georgia Code 20-2-142 (no date available) requires the state Board of Education to prescribe a course of study in health and physical education for all grade levels.

State Board of Education Rule 160-4-2-.12 2011) requires 90 hours of contact instruction in physical education and health for students in grades K-5 and must be made available for students in grades 6-12.
No state policy. The Quality Core Curriculum Standards and Resources. Code 20-2-777 (2009) requires each local school district to conduct an annual fitness assessment program once each school year for students in grades 1-12. The assessment must be conducted during a physical education course taught by a physical education instructor. The minimum requirements for prospective health and physical education teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure is a renewable certificate, according to Public Standards Commission Rule 505-2-.71 (2004).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
State Board of Education Rule 160-4-2-.47 (2002) requires high school students to complete one unit of health and physical education (out of 22 units). No state policy. State Board of Education Rule 160-5-1-.19 (1997) requires each local school board to adopt a policy regulating competitive interscholastic activities for grades 6-12. Student eligibility and physical examination requirements are outlined in the rule. No state policy. No state policy.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Hawaii State Board of Education Policy 4540 (2006).

The state Wellness Guidelines, which schools are required to implement over a 4-year period through 2010-2011, require 45 minutes of physical education classes per week for grades K-3, 55 minutes per week for grades 4-5, 107 minutes per week for elementary grade 6, and 200 minutes per week for secondary grades 6-12.
No state policy. The state has adopted Physical Education Content Standards (2005) for grades K-12 that serve as a guideline but not a specific curriculum for schools to follow. No state policy. The minimum requirement for prospective physical education teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor’s degree, with no additional coursework in physical education.

The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in Administrative Rule 8-54-9 (1998).
Idaho Statute 33-1605 (no date available) requires all school districts to provide instruction in health and physical fitness. No state policy. The Idaho Content Standards for Physical Education (2010) set uniform content standards for physical education for elementary, middle, and high schools. No state policy. No state policy.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
State Board of Education Policy 4540 (2006) requires one credit of physical education. No state policy. No state policy. Statute 291C-A (2012) creates a Safe Routes to School program within the Department of Transportation, Department of Education, and Department of Health. The state Board of Education amended its Health, Wellness, and Safety Policy in 2006 to require the Department of Education to create a plan for measuring implementation of the wellness policy. Hawaii is unique in that the entire state constitutes a single school district.



No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Illinois 105 Illinois Compiled Statute 5/27-5 (1996) mandates all school boards to provide for instruction and training in physical education of students in their schools. 105 Illinois Compiled Statute 5/27-6 (1996) also states that students enrolled in public schools (K-12) must engage in a course of physical education daily during the school day. A school board may authorize an exemption for students in grades 11 and 12 for the following reasons: (1) ongoing participation in interscholastic athletic programs, (2) enrollment in academic classes required for admission to an institution of higher learning, (3) enrollment in academic classes required for graduation from high school, (4) involvement in a for-credit marching band program (grades 9-12), and (5) involvement in a school-sponsored JROTC program or to receive special education support and services. 105 Illinois Compiled Statute 5/27-7 (1998) calls for the state Board of Education to prepare and make available guidelines that incorporate the purposes stated in the statute for physical education for all grades and types of schools. In 1997 the state approved the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health. No state policy. Candidates must complete a state-approved program for physical education that is based on state content and teacher standards.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
No state policy, but exemptions exist for grades 11-12. No state policy; however, recess may count toward the daily physical education mandate 105 Illinois Compiled Statute 5/27-6 (1996) at the elementary level as long as it is supervised by a certified teacher. No state policy. 20 Illinois Compiled Statute 2705/2705-317 (2002) requires the state Board of Education, and the Department of Transportation to establish and administer a Safe Routes to School program. The state Board of Education and the Illinois Nutrition Education and Training Program provides districts with wellness policy resources. The state Board of Education also adopted a State Goal on Wellness Policy (2007).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Indiana Code 20-30-5-7 (2005) requires school corporations (local school districts) to provide physical fitness as part of the curriculum.

Code 20-30-5-7.5 (2006) requires school corporations to provide daily physical activity in elementary school, which may include recess.

511 Indiana Administrative Code 6.1-5-2.6 (2010) includes physical education in the required curriculum for elementary school. 511 Indiana Administrative Code 6.1-5-3.6 includes physical education in the required curriculum for middle school.
No state policy. 511 Indiana Administrative Code 6.1-5-0.6 (2010) requires each school corporation to develop and implement a curriculum for K-12. No state policy. Required to have a bachelor’s degree with a content area in physical education from an approved program. Prospective high school teachers are required to have a major in physical education from an approved program. The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in 515-8-1-29.1 (2010).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
Two credits of physical education. No state policy.

Indiana Administrative Code 20-30-5-7.5 (2006) requires school corporations to provide daily physical activity for students in elementary school consisting of curricula and programs and may include the use of recess beginning in the 2006-2007 school year.
No state policy. No state policy. Code 20-26-9 (2006) requires each school board to establish a coordinated school health advisory council.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Iowa Code 256.11 (2005) requires physical education to be taught in grades 1-12. All students in grades 9-12 are required to participate in physical education activities for at least a one-eighth of a unit each semester.

Code 256.11(6) (2009) requires students in grades K-5 to engage in 30 minutes of physical activity daily and students in grades 6-12 to engage in 120 minutes per week.

Exemptions may be granted on the basis of conflict with religious beliefs, upon a written request from a parent.

For students in grades 6-12, the requirement may be met by participation in interscholastic athletics, school-sponsored marching band, show choir, dance, drill, cheer or similar activities, specified non-school sports activities, or similar endeavors that involve movement, manipulation, or exertion of the body.
Code 256.11 (2009) allows for exemptions for work study, special academic classes, or athletics for students in 12th grade.

Students in grades 9-12 may be excused if requested by a parent or guardian but must participate in an athletic program.

This is not required if a parent or guardian files a written statement with the school principal stating that the course or activity conflicts with religious belief.
281 Iowa Administrative Code 12.5 outlines the specifics of instruction that students should receive in prekindergarten, kindergarten, and grades 1-12. No state policy. 282 Iowa Administrative Code 13.28 states that the minimum requirement for a physical education K-12 basic teacher license and physical education endorsement is the completion of 24 semester hours in specific courses.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
One credit of basic physical education. The Iowa Association of School Board’s model wellness policy (2010) recommends at least 20 minutes a day of recess and discourages more than 2 hours of inactivity a day. The policy also recommends that withholding recess should not be used as a tool for punishment. 281 Iowa Administrative Code 36.14 prescribes rules for participation in extracurricular athletic competition. 281 Iowa Administrative Code 36.15 prescribes the eligibility requirements. Code 280.13 organization must be registered with the Department of Education. No state policy. The Iowa Association of School Boards provides a model wellness policy and additional support materials.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Kansas State Board Regulation 91-31-32 (2005) requires that as a prerequisite for accreditation each school provide physical education.

The Kansas School Wellness Policy Model Guidelines (2005) provide time recommendations for physical education.

House Resolution 6011 2006) states the legislature’s support for physical education and urges the state Board of Education to require some type of physical education class for grades K-12.
Regulation 91-31-35 (2005) allows the physical education (including health) high school graduation requirement to be waived for medical or religious reasons.

Regulation 91-31-34 (2005) states that “a school shall neither offer credit for athletic practice nor count athletic practice as a physical education course.”
The state does not have a required or suggested curriculum. However, the Department of Education encourages use of the Kansas Model Curricular Standards for Physical Education (no date available) to plan and implement health education in schools. No state policy. The minimum requirement for prospective physical education teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor’s degree, with no additional coursework in physical education.

Kentucky Kentucky schools must follow the Program of Studies for Kentucky Schools Grades PreK-12 2006), which outlines minimum state education requirements and provides curriculum guidelines. No state policy. The state Board of Education’s Learning Goals and Academic Expectations detail the state’s standards. Under revision. Bachelor’s degree, successful completion of the applicable assessment, and a recommendation from an approved preparation program.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
State Board Regulation 91-31-35 (2005) requires one unit of physical education. The Wellness Policy Guidelines recommend that elementary schools provide 20 minutes of supervised recess daily. No state policy. No state policy. The state requires local education agencies to annually complete the online Wellness Policy Builder assessment tool required by Senate Bill 154.
One unit of both health and physical education. No state policy. State Board of Education Regulation 702 KAR 7:065 (2004) designates the Kentucky High School Athletic Association as the agent to manage interscholastic athletics at the high school level. No state policy. Revised Statute 158.856 (2005) requires each school food service director to annually assess and prepare a written report for local school board members, council members, and parents that addresses compliance with federal food and meal standards.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Louisiana Bulletin 741 (2008) requires students in grades 1-6 and 7-8 to receive 150 minutes of physical education per week. Bulletin 741, 2717, allows an approved JROTC program to be substituted for the two credits of health and physical education upon board approval.

Exemptions for medical reasons only, but the number of credits required for graduation remains at 23.
The Louisiana State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education formally adopted Physical Education Content Standards with Bulletin 102 (2009).

The standards document also serves as a suggested curriculum framework, although local schools are not required to adhere to it.
No state policy. Bachelor’s degree, with 4 semester hours in health and physical education.

Secondary certification requires a completion of 30 hours of health and physical education courses.

Maine Statute Title 20-A 4711 (2001) requires all elementary schools to provide the basic coursework, which includes physical education, for all students. No state policy. PreK-12 standards are in place, but there is no curriculum. Title 20-A Chapter 207-A and Chapter 222 provide guidance on instruction standards and assessment requirements. Bachelor’s degree with at least 36 credit hours in physical education.

Maryland Codes 7-409 (2005) and 2-205 (1996) require each public school to have a physical education program for all students in grades K-12.

State Board of Education Regulation 13A.04.13.01 (2001) outlines the requirements for the physical education instructional program in grades K-12.
No state policy. Regulation 13A.04.13.01 (2001) provides program goals for physical education in grades K-12. No state policy. Bachelor’s degree with a major in physical education or completion of 36 semester hours of course content work in physical education and completion of the professional education course and experience requirements found in State Board of Education Regulation 13A.12.02.06 (2003).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
In Bulletin 741 (2005), Section 2319 requires 1.5 units of physical education. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Dairy Council, created a comprehensive Model School Wellness Policy (2006).

Education Rule Chapter 127 (2002) requires one credit of physical education. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. The state Board of Education adapted its model local wellness policy (2005) directly from the Michigan State Board of Education’s Policy (2005).

One-half credit of physical education. No state policy. State Board of Education Regulation 13A.06.03.02 (1994) sets the eligibility requirements for student participation in interscholastic athletics at the high school level. No state policy. House Bill 1264 (2009) authorizes local school systems to develop and implement annual wellness policy implementation and monitoring plans.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Massachusetts General Law 71.1 (no date available) requires all schools to provide instruction in physical education, but grade levels or amounts of instruction are not specified.

General Law 71.3 (no date available) states that “physical education shall be taught as a required subject in all grades for all students in the public schools for the purpose of promoting the physical well-being of such students.”
General Law 71.3 allows waivers for medical reasons. General Law 71.1 requires instructions in “fitness and body dynamics.”

The Common Core of Learning (1994) outlines the state’s basic standards for students, and the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Curriculum Framework (1999) provides a more detailed vision of standards for what students should be able to learn and know regarding physical activity and fitness in grades PreK-12. The framework serves as a suggested curriculum for local schools.
No state policy. Bachelor’s degree (603 CMR 7.05 [2006] provides general guidelines).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
High school students are not required to complete specified units of physical education. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. House Bill 4459 (2010) requires each School Wellness Advisory Council to review and evaluate the school district’s wellness policy every 3 years.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Michigan The Michigan State Board of Education’s nonbinding Policy on Quality Physical Education (2003) recommends that instructional periods total 150 minutes per week for elementary school students and 225 minutes per week for middle and high school students.

The Model Local Wellness Policy (2005) recommends districts adopt policies promoting physical education opportunities.
Michigan Compiled Law 380.1278b allows a student to substitute one physical education and health credit to acquire extra English language arts, mathematics, science, or world language credits, if a student has an approved personal curriculum.

In addition, students may test out of any state-required graduation credit.
Schools are encouraged to use the Michigan Department of Education’s Physical Education Content Standards and Benchmarks (1998). No state policy. No state policy.

Minnesota Statute 120A.22 (2005) requires physical education for students ages 7-16 (and frequency not specified) and assigns responsibility for developing standards to local districts.

Although not outlined in code, precedence has determined that physical education must be taught at all grade levels in elementary and middle/junior high schools, and must be taught at least once in high school.
The state Board of Education requires all students to participate in physical education classes unless there is an appropriate written request (from a parent, guardian, or medical practitioner) for a student not to participate. Standards are to be developed locally. The Healthy Kids Bill (2010) requires the Department of Education to adopt the NASPE standards as statewide standards. Local districts are required to develop assessments for physical education. State Board of Education Rule 8710.4700 (2002) requires a bachelor’s degree.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
Michigan Compiled Law 380.1278a (2007) requires one credit of health and physical education. Schools have flexibility in how they meet the requirement. The Michigan State Board of Education (2000) recommends that public schools offer daily recess or physical activity. No state policy. No state policy. The Michigan State Board of Education Model Local Wellness Policy (2005) provides a comprehensive policy template for districts to meet Section 204 requirements that can be modified to address local governance issues.



Must be taught at least once in high school. No high school graduation requirement. No state policy. Statute 121A.04 (2003) requires each educational institution to provide equal opportunities for both sexes to participate in its athletic program. No state policy. The Healthy Kids Bill (2010) encourages the Department of Education to develop guidelines that local districts can adopt.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Mississippi Code 37-13-134 (2007) requires the following for physical education: 150 minutes weekly of activity-based instruction as defined by the state Board of Education instruction for K-8 and half of a Carnegie unit of physical activity or physical education for graduation (grades 9-12).

State Board of Education Policy 4012 (2008) defines physical education, physical activity and activity-based instruction and further stipulates that of the required 150 minutes of activity-based instruction, the total number of minutes of physical education may not be under 50 per week for grades K-8.
State Board of Education Policy 4012 (2008) allows extracurricular activities in grades 7-8, which is sanctioned by the Mississippi High School Association and JROTC if approved by the Mississippi Department of Education supervises practices and games.

State Board of Education Policy 4012 (2008) also allows for a medical exemption.
Standard 33 of the Mississippi Public School Accountability Standards (2006) states the basic curriculum of each elementary and middle school to include physical education.

Standard 32 requires physical education be a part of the high school basic curriculum on an elective basis.
State Board of Education Policy 4012 (2008) requires fitness testing using the Fitnessgram®, Activity-gram®, President’s Challenge to Fitness, or other comparable program.

The assessment must be conducted in grade 5, and the grade the student will earn the one-half Carnegie unit of physical education for graduation.
The minimum requirement for prospective physical education teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor’s degree, a standard MS license, and 21 semester hours in physical education.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
Half of a Carnegie unit of physical activity or physical education. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. The state Department of Education produced the Local School Wellness Policy Guide for Development (2005).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Missouri Statute 161.102.

The Missouri School Improvement Program, which includes school accreditation standards (2001), requires that each elementary student receives instruction in physical education for a minimum of 50 minutes each week (25 minutes for half-day kindergarten classes) and that the classes be taught by teachers certificated in the field.

Junior high/ middle schools must teach physical education to all students for a minimum of 3,000 minutes each year.
None, except for students in the adult diploma program.

The state’s Graduation Requirements Handbook (2009) specifies that “courses devoted to conditioning for interscholastic sports or practicing for interscholastic sports may not be counted toward meeting the minimum requirement.”
5 CSR 50-375.100 (1996) lists the Show-Me standards for health and physical education.

The state’s voluntary framework is Missouri’s Framework for Curriculum Development in Health Education and Physical Education (2009), which calls for students to receive instruction on efficiency of human movement and performance and on physical activity and lifetime wellness.
Each year schools are required to submit by building the percentage of 5th- and 9th-grade students who meet the minimum criteria for the Missouri Physical Fitness Assessment Program (2000). The state does not have a policy specifically stating preservice physical educator requirements; however, revised Statute 168.081 (2002) prohibits a person from engaging in the practice of teaching in grades K-12 without a valid Missouri certificate.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
One unit credit in physical education, out of 24 specified units, as outlined in the Graduation Requirements Handbook (2009). SB291 (2009) requires elementary schools to provide students a minimum of one recess period of 20 minutes per day. This may be incorporated into the lunch period. No state policy. No state policy. A local wellness policy presentation created by a Department of Education staff member includes resources, guidelines, requirements, etc., to aid districts in developing local wellness policies.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Montana Elementary, middle/junior high, and high school students are required to take health enhancement courses per standards for school accreditation outlined in State Board of Education Administrative Rule 10.54.2501 (2000).

State Board of Education Administrative Rule 10.55.905 (2000) requires one unit of health enhancement, with one-half unit each year, for 2 years in high school and one-half unit each year for middle school students.

A “unit” is equal to 225 minutes per week. (Note: In the Montana School Accreditation Standards, the traditional disciplines of health education and physical education are combined into one content area called health enhancement.)
No state policy. With State Board of Education Administrative Rule 10.54.7010-7073 (1999), the State Board adopted the Health Enhancement K-12 Content and Performance Standards for grade levels (by end of grades 4, 8, and 12). The state does not require schools to follow a specific curriculum. No state policy. No state policy.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
State Board of Education Administrative Rule 10.55.905 (2000) requires one unit of health enhancement, with one-half unit each year, for 2 years in high school. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. The State Board of Public Education adopted a position statement encouraging districts to adopt and implement local wellness policies.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Nebraska 92 Nebraska Administrative Code 10-004.04B7 (no date available) requires that the high school program include 20 instructional units (out of a total of 400) or 2 years of daily classes or the equivalent in personal health and physical fitness.

92 Nebraska Administrative Code 10-004.03A9 (no date available) and 92 Nebraska Administrative Code 10-004.03A9 (no date available) mandate physical education for elementary and middle school.
No state policy. 92 Nebraska Administrative Code 10-004.02A6, 92 Nebraska Administrative Code 10-004.03A9, and 92 Nebraska Administrative Code 10-004.04B7 outline the required K-12 curriculum for Nebraska schools.

The Nebraska Physical Education Essential Learnings (2006) outlines what students are expected to know and be able to do by the end of grades 2, 5, 8, and 12.
No state policy. The minimum requirements for a physical education endorsement are at least 27 semester hours in physical education courses for K-6 or 7-12 endorsements.

Both endorsements require a minimum of 15 semester hours in scientific foundations and a minimum of 12 semester hours in techniques.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
92 Nebraska Administrative Code 10-004.04B7 (no date available) requires that the high school program include 20 instructional units (out of a total of 400) or 2 years of daily classes or the equivalent in personal health and physical fitness. No state policy. Statute 79-2,116 (no date available) declares it unfair and discriminatory to deny comparable opportunities for interscholastic and intramural athletic programs for both genders. No state policy. No state policy.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Nevada Nevada Revised Statute 389.018 (2003) requires physical education be taught, as practicable, in all public schools. State Board of Education Administrative Codes 389.2425, 389.283, 389.2946, 389.386, and 389.485, detail student performance standards in physical education for grades 2, 3, 5, 8, and high school. No mandate for elementary, middle, or high school. State Board of Education Administrative Code 389.488 (1987) allows a student to be exempt from taking a course in physical education based on a physical or mental condition supported by a written statement from a physician, religious beliefs supported by a written statement from a parent/guardian, enrollment in JROTC, or intentions of enrolling in a course comparable to physical education.

A school district may exempt a pupil for not more than one credit for participating in interscholastic athletics, on a drill team, in a marching band, in a dance group, or on a cheerleading squad if school sponsored and if the student participates for at least 120 hours.
State Board of Education Administrative Codes 389.283, 389.2946, 389.386, and 389.485 also include student performance standards for physical education for grades 2, 3, 5, 8, and 12.

The state Department of Education’s website offers documents that summarize the Physical Education Content Standards (2000).

Schools are not required to follow a specific curriculum.
No state policy. Bachelor’s degree and the completion of 12 semester hours of physical education.

For prospective secondary physical education candidates, the minimum requirements are a bachelor’s degree and a major (constituting 36 semester hours) or minor in physical education.

For a K-12 physical education endorsement, a candidate must also possess a bachelor’s degree, 42 semester hours of coursework, and 22 semester hours of professional education as outlined in State Board of Education Administrative Code 391.280 (1991).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
State Board of Education Rule 389.664 (Board of Education Rule) requires two units of physical education to receive a standard high school diploma. No state policy. No state policy. Assembly Bill 231 (2005) requires local and regional governmental entities to conduct a review and evaluation of existing walking paths and sidewalks for pupils in a 1-mile radius of each public school. The State Board of Education implemented mandatory guidelines via a Statewide School Wellness Policy (2005).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
New Hampshire State Board of Education Rule Ed 306.26 (2005) gives local school boards the authority to adopt instructional time requirements for K-8 physical education. The state permits local districts to allow students to substitute extended learning (activities provided outside the regular school day that align with the local physical education curriculum) to meet the physical education requirements in middle and high school. The Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines (2005) provide suggestions for curriculum content in physical education for students in grades K-12. No state policy. The minimum requirement for prospective physical education teachers in grades K-12 prior to licensure is a bachelor’s degree and demonstrated competency in the areas described in State Board of Education Rule Ed 507.16 (2003).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
State Board of Education Rule Ed 306.27 (2005) requires that high school students complete one credit in physical education coursework in order to graduate (out of 20 required), and high schools must offer at least two credits in physical education (out of 45 required). State Board of Education Rule Ed 310.04 (2005) requires developmentally appropriate daily physical activity to encourage physical activity recess periods. No state policy. No state policy. The state Department of Education has created a Local Wellness Policy Toolkit (2005) that includes school wellness policy and resources assessment form.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
New Jersey New Jersey Statutes Annotated 18A:35-7&8 (1967) require that students in grades 1-12 receive 150 minutes (or 2 hours) of health, safety, and physical education per week.

Local school districts decide how many minutes per week are necessary in each area in order to achieve the core standards.
Determined by local school boards. Per State Board of Education Administrative Code 6A:14-4.1(f) (no date available), schools are required to provide alternatives in order for students with a disability to meet the physical education core standards. The mandatory core curriculum content standards for Comprehensive Health and Physical Education (2009) include instruction in identifying the short- and long-term benefits of physical activity and engaging students in vigorous physical activity that develops all components of fitness.

Standards 2.5, Motor Skill Development, and 2.6, Fitness, must be met by the end of grades 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12.
No state policy. State Board of Education Administrative Code 6A:9-9.2 (2004) allows a physical education or health and physical education endorsement, which both authorize the holder to teach physical education in public schools.

For an endorsement in health and physical education, State Board of Education Administrative Code 6A:9-11.8 (2004) requires a candidate to fulfill a 30-credit sequence of courses and a minimum of 15 credits in physical education.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
State Board of Education Administrative Code 6A:8-5 (no date available) requires 3.75 credits of health and physical education per year (out of a total 110 credits required). No state policy. New Jersey Administrative Code 6A:16 requires a medical examination prior to participation on a school-sponsored interscholastic or intramural team or squad for students enrolled in grades 6-12. New Jersey Statute Annotated 18A:33-15 to 18 (2007) requires school districts participating in any of the federally funded child nutrition programs to submit their local policies to the state Department of Agriculture for a compliance check with the state’s Model Nutrition Policy (2005).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
New Mexico 22-13-1 New Mexico Statute Annotated (2005) requires students in grades 1-8 to receive instruction in physical education. 6.30.2.10.J9(n) New Mexico Administrative Code (2000) allows the physical education graduation requirement to be waved because of a permanent or chronic medical condition that does not permit physical activity. 6.29.9.8 New Mexico Administrative Code (2009) details the New Mexico Public Education Department K-12 content standards with benchmarks and performance standards for physical education.

Local school districts are required to align their K-12 physical education curriculum to these K-12 Physical Education Standards (1997, revised 2006) content standards with benchmarks and performance standards.
No state policy. Complete the requirements for an elementary (K-8) license (6.61.2 New Mexico Administrative Code) or a middle school (5-9) license (6.61.3 New Mexico Administrative Code) or a secondary (7-12) license (6.61.4 New Mexico Administrative Code) or a PreK-12 license (6.61.5 New Mexico Administrative Code).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
New Mexico Statute Annotated (2009) requires students to have one unit in physical education or other physical activity. The School Wellness Policy Guidance Document recommends that schools provide daily recess for all elementary students. It also recommends that all districts prohibit withholding physical activity (physical education class, recess, etc.) as a means/method of punishment. State Board of Education Administrative Code 6.13.3.8 (2000) sets the eligibility requirements for student participation in interscholastic student activities.

State Board of Education Administrative Code 6.13.4.8 (2000) requires local school boards to provide comparable athletic opportunities for both sexes.
66-7-501 New Mexico Statute Annotated (2003) creates the Safe Routes to School program to increase and make safer a student’s ability to walk or ride a bicycle to school. Rule 6.12.6 New Mexico Administrative Code requires each school district and charter school to develop and implement a policy that addresses student and school employee wellness through a coordinated school health approach.

The law goes beyond federal minimum requirements to specifically include nutritional requirements for a la carte items and school-sponsored fundraisers before, during, and after school hours and requires that a planned, sequential K-12 health and physical education curriculum aligned with state benchmarks be included in the wellness policy.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
New York Regulation 135.4(c)(2)(a) requires daily participation in physical education for students in grades K-3 and three times each week for grades 4-6. The minimum time devoted to physical education shall be at least 120 minutes each week. For grades 7-12 the regulations require physical education three times per week in one semester, and two times per week in the second, or a comparable time each semester if the school is organized in other patterns. Education Law 803 requires physical education instruction for all pupils above the age of 8 in all elementary and secondary schools. No state policy. Standard 1 of the Learning Standards for Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer Sciences (1996) provides a suggested curriculum framework but does not require that schools adhere to it or any other specific curriculum. No state policy. Bachelor’s degree with specified coursework and grades for all teachers and must pass the Assessment of Teaching Skills, CST in Physical Education, and the LAST.

Candidates must also have 40 days of supervised teaching experience in physical education within the applicable grade range and fingerprint clearance.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
Regulation 100.5 (2005) requires high school students to earn 2 units in physical education (out of 22). No state policy. No state policy. Transportation Law 444 (Section 14, Subdivision 35) (2004) establishes and administers a Safe Routes to School program. A February 2005 memo to school food services directors/managers from the state Department of Education provides guidance and suggestions for creating local wellness policies, including links to resources, background information, rationales, and policy process guidance.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
North Carolina State Board of Education Policy GCS-S-000 (2005) requires students enrolled in K-8 to participate in physical activity as part of the district’s physical education curriculum.

Elementary schools should consider providing 150 minutes per week and middle schools should consider 225 minutes per week, including a minimum of physical education every other day for the school year.
No state policy. The North Carolina Healthful Living Standard Course of Study (2006) outlines the content that districts are expected to follow.

The curriculum calls for students in grades K-12 to receive instruction in motor skills and movement patterns, skill acquisition and performance, establishing and maintaining regular participation in physical activity, accepting responsibility for personal fitness, demonstrating responsible personal and social behavior in physical activity settings, and development of an awareness of the intrinsic value and benefits of participation in physical activity.
The North Carolina Healthful Living Standard Course of Study (2006) requires that students in select grades complete a pre- and post-health-enhancing fitness assessment, including heart monitoring. An approved teacher education program requires a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 at the time of admission to and exit from the program, a satisfactory Praxis I score for admission to the program, a minimum of 10 weeks of student teaching, completion of a technology product of learning, and completion of a program of study that meets state-approved standards and indicators for the specialty area.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
One credit (out of 20) in health and physical education. Although there is no specific recess requirement, State Board of Education Policy GCS-S-000 (2005) requires schools to provide a minimum of 30 minutes daily of moderate to vigorous physical activity to all K-8 students.

Recess is often used to fulfill this requirement.

In addition, the policy prohibits taking away structured/ unstructured recess and other physical activity from students as a form of punishment and prohibits using severe and inappropriate exercise as a form of punishment for students.
16 North Carolina Administrative Code 06E .0202 (2000) allows only students in grades 7-12 to participate in interscholastic athletic competition. Requirements to qualify for participation are outlined in the code. No state policy. State nutrition consultants review local wellness policies as part of the School Meal Initiative Review.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
North Dakota In Code 15.1-21-01 (no date available), the superintendent ensures that all students will receive instruction in physical education. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. The minimum requirements to teach physical education are possession of a license to teach by the education Code 15.1-18-10.


Ohio Pursuant to Ohio Administrative Codes 3301-35-04 (2001) and 3313.60 (2001), physical education is a required part of the curriculum for all levels, although duration and frequency are not specified. Ohio Revised Code 3313.6016 (2010) requires the Board of Education of each city or local school district to require all students in K-12 to engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate to rigorous physical activity each school day, exclusive of recess. Pursuant to Ohio Administrative Code 3313.603 (2007), the Board of Education of each school district may adopt a policy to excuse from the physical education requirement each student who, during high school, has participated in interscholastic athletics, marching band, or cheerleading for at least two full seasons. If the board or another authority adopts such a policy, it may not require the student to complete any physical education course as a condition to graduate. No state policy. No state policy. Physical educators in Ohio are required to hold a multiage license in physical education valid for teaching physical education in grades PreK-12.

Ohio Revised Code 3319.076 2010) requires all physical education teachers hired by districts after July 1, 2013, to provide instruction in grades K-12 to have a valid license for teaching physical education pursuant to Ohio Revised Code 3319.076 (2010).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
Code 15.1-21-02 (2007) requires one unit of physical education, of which one-half may be health for grades 9-12 (local district requirements range from one-half to two credits of physical education for graduation). No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. The state Department of Public Instruction provides resources from its Moving Forward with School Wellness: Making Your District Policy Work for Healthy Children workshop. In conjunction with Team Nutrition, the department has produced a Local Wellness Policy handout (2006) with information on federal wellness requirements and to help aid school districts in the basic requirements for local wellness policies.

Complete one-half unit of coursework in physical education. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. Healthier Schools: A Brighter Tomorrow, which acts as a guide for the development of wellness policies and points to examples of best practices in other states.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Oklahoma Statute 70-11-103.9 (2005) requires that all public elementary schools, grades K-5, provide instruction in physical education or an exercise program for a minimum of an average of 60 minutes per week. Senate Bill 1186 (2008) requires an additional 60 minutes each week of physical activity, which may include, but is not limited to, physical education, exercise programs, fitness breaks, recess, classroom activities, and wellness and nutrition education. Each school district board of education shall determine the specific activities and means of compliance with the provisions of the law. Statute 70-11-103.9 (2005) requires school districts to provide all students physical education programs, which may include athletics, for accreditation. No state policy. Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS) Integrated Curriculum: Health, Safety and Physical Education (2002) provides a suggested framework to promote the health and well-being of each student in grades K-12 and guide them toward becoming physically active for life. No state policy. Competencies for Licensure & Certification (2002) provides an outline of the knowledge and skills required for physical education/safety licensure and certification.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
No state policy. 70-11-103.9 (2007) requires the Board of Education to strongly encourage school districts to incorporate physical activity into the school day by providing to students in full-day kindergarten and grades 1-5 at least a 20-minute daily recess, in addition to the 60 minutes of required physical education. It also encourages districts to allow students brief physical activity breaks throughout the day, physical activity clubs, and special events. No state policy. No state policy. Statute Title 70 Section 24-100b (2005) requires each school district to report to the state Department of Education on the district’s wellness policy, goals, guidelines, and progress in implementing the policy and attaining the goals.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Oregon Oregon Administrative Rule 581-022-1210 (2005) requires school districts to provide a K-12 instructional program that includes physical education.

House Bill 3141 (2007) requires every public school student in grades K-8 to participate in physical education for the entire school year.

Students in grades K-5 are required to participate in physical education for at least 150 minutes each week. Students in grades 6-8 are required to participate in physical education for at least 225 minutes each week. School districts are required to devote at least 50 percent of physical education class time to actual physical activity. Full compliance is required by the 2017-2018 school year.
Oregon Administrative Rule 581-022-1910 (1996) allows a district to excuse a pupil from a state-required program or learning activity to accommodate a student’s disability or religious beliefs. The Physical Education Standards (2005) recommend students in grades K-12 acquire the knowledge and skills to understand the role of physical activity in promoting health.

Oregon Administrative Rule 581-022-1210 requires each district to have a planned K-12 instructional program with common curriculum goals and content standards in physical education.

House Bill 3141 (2007) requires school districts to offer instruction in physical education that meets the academic content standards for physical education adopted by the State Board of Education under Oregon Revised Statute 329.045 2003).
No state policy. Oregon Administrative Rule 584-036-0015 (2005) states that an elementary subject matter endorsement for grades PreK-9 is valid for departmental assignments in physical education. All subject matter endorsements, except elementary, are valid for teaching physical education in grades 5-12. For a basic physical education endorsement, 48 quarter hours are required to demonstrate the competence outlined in Oregon Administrative Rule 548-038-0230 (1989).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
Oregon Administrative Rule 581-022-1130 (2002) states that students must complete one unit of coursework in physical education. No state policy. Oregon Administrative Rule 581-022-1680 (1996) states that school districts may allow only organizations that have been approved by the state board to administer interscholastic activities. Oregon Revised Statute 195.119 (2003) requires local governments to work with school district personnel to identify barriers and hazards to children walking or bicycling to and from school. House Bill 2742 (2005) establishes the Safe Routes to School program and funds within the Department of Transportation. The Department of Education has provided local education agencies with several documents for creating and implementing wellness policies, including a school wellness newsletter with tips, resources, and highlights of exemplary districts.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Pennsylvania Students at the elementary, middle, and high school levels shall receive planned instruction in physical education aligned with the academic standards according to 022 PA Code 4.27 (1999). Further details of the requirements at the elementary level can be found in 022 PA Code 4.21 (1999), at the middle school in 022 PA Code 4.22 1999), and at the high school level in 022 PA Code 4.23 (1999). Parents/ guardians may remove the child from instruction when it conflicts with religious beliefs.

A written request must be submitted to the school.
Academic Standards for Health, Safety, and Physical Education (2003) describe what students should know and be able to do by the end of grades 3, 6, 9, and 12. The standards are mandated and binding. Schools are not required to follow a specific curriculum but are required to use the standards as a curricular framework for development of the local curriculum. No state policy. 24 P.S. 12-1202 (no date available) requires that teachers be certified in the field in which they teach.

Rhode Island Statute § 16-22-4 (2008) requires all children in grades 1-12 attending public schools to receive instruction in health and physical education for an average of at least 20 minutes in each school day. No state policy. Statute § 16-22-4 (2008) requires the physical education curriculum to be based on the physical education standards of the Rhode Island Physical Education Framework: Supporting Physically Active Lifestyles Through Quality Physical Education (2003) by September 2012. Statute § 16-1-5 (2004) assigns the Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education to establish an assessment program in areas of health and fitness. The minimum certification requirement for prospective physical education teachers is a bachelor’s degree that must include 24 semester hours of physical education coursework.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
022 PA Code 57.31 (1988) requires the completion of one health and physical education credit. No state policy. 022 PA Code 4.27 (1999) requires students of both sexes to have equal access in interscholastic and intramural programs. No state policy. Local education agencies are required to complete a Local Wellness Policy Checklist and submit it to the state Department of Education with their Wellness Policy.

Statute § 16-22-4 (2008) requires all children in grades 1-12 attending public schools to receive instruction in health and physical education for an average of at least 20 minutes in each school day.

No graduation requirement.
No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. Statute § 16-2-9(a)(25) (2005), Statute § 16-21-28 (2005), and Statute § 16-7.1-2(h) 2005) require the school committee of each district to establish a district-wide coordinated school health and wellness subcommittee, chaired by a member of the full school committee, to implement policies and plans to meet Section 204 requirements.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
South Carolina Code 59-10-10 (2005) mandates that students in grades K-5 be provided with at least 150 minutes of physical activity per week, 90 minutes of which must be in physical education. Code 59-10-10 (2005) allows students in grades K-5 to be exempt from physical education and activity requirements if they meet the standards for exemptions set forth in Code 59-29-80. Exemptions are granted for students involved in a military or naval JROTC.

Waiver from the local school board of trustees for medical or religious reasons.
The Board of Education adopted the Physical Education Curriculum Standards (2008). The state does not require schools to follow a specific curriculum, nor does it provide one. Code 59-10-10 requires each student’s individual fitness status to be reported to their parent or legal guardian during their 5th-grade, 8th-grade, and high school physical education courses. Bachelor’s degree, certification at the early childhood, elementary, middle, secondary, or PreK-12 level, minimum qualifying score on the content-area examination, and 30 semester hours in physical education coursework.

South Dakota Physical education is not required at any specific grade level. No state policy. The State Board of Education approved voluntary South Dakota Physical Education Content Standards (2000), which are organized in grade-level clusters K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12. The state does not require or recommend a specific curriculum framework or curriculum materials. No state policy. Bachelor’s degree, with 2 semester hours of first aid and health.

For prospective teachers in high school, the state requires a bachelor’s degree, with at least 24 semester hours in health coursework.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
One unit (out of 24) of physical education or JROTC for a high school diploma, per State Board of Education R 43-259 (2003). The Position Statement on School Recess of the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness recommends that schools allot time each day for supervised recess for elementary students. It also states that recess should not be denied as a form of punishment. State Board of Education Regulation R 43-244 (1980) prohibits schools serving grades 1-6 from providing competitive sports “of a varsity pattern with scheduled league games and championships.”

State Board of Education Regulation R 43-244.1 (1988) and Code 59-39-160 (no date available) outline the academic requirements for students in grades 9-12 to participate in interscholastic activities.
Code 59-17-150 (2004) requires municipal and county governing bodies to work with school districts to identify barriers and hazards to children walking or bicycling to and from school. Code 59-10-330 (2005) requires each school district to establish and maintain a Coordinated School Health Advisory Council. The council is required to assess, plan, implement, and monitor district and school health policies and programs, including the development of a district wellness policy.

Beginning with students who are freshmen in the fall of 2013, one-half unit of physical education is required (2009). No state policy. Statute 13-36-4 (2003) gives the school board power to delegate the control, supervision, and regulation of any high school interscholastic activities to any voluntary, nonprofit association. Statute 13-36-7 (2003) deems any student enrolled in a public school district eligible to participate in any interscholastic activity sponsored by the South Dakota High School Activities Association. No state policy. The Board of Education has produced a Model Wellness Policy (2005) based on science, research, and existing practices from exemplary states and local school districts around the country. The policy encourages school districts to establish and maintain a coordinated school health program that addresses all components of school health, including mental health services and school health services, which are not addressed in the model.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Tennessee Physical education is a required subject for students in grades K-8. Rules of the State Board of Education Minimum Requirements for the Approval of Public Schools 0520-1-3-.05 (2008) state modifications for students with disabilities.

In addition, the rules permit school districts and schools to allow students to substitute JROTC for their required Lifetime Wellness credit in high school.
Lifetime Wellness: Grades 9-12 (2007) and Physical Education: Grades 9-12 provides the required curriculum standards for health, physical fitness education, and wellness in high school. Physical fitness assessment guidelines can be found at the Tennessee Department of Education website, Lifetime Wellness: Grades 9-12 (2007). Bachelor’s degree, a supervised physical education internship or student teaching experience in both K-4 and 5-12 settings, and a major in physical education.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
1.5 credits of physical education and wellness. Although not specifically requiring recess, 49-6-1021 (2006) requires each local education agency to integrate a minimum of 90 minutes of physical activity per week into the instructional school day for elementary and secondary school students. Rules of the State Board of Education Minimum Requirements for the Approval of Public Schools 0520-1-3-.05 (2008) state that interscholastic athletics shall not be substituted for the wellness requirement. No state policy. The Tennessee State Board of Education Physical Activity Policy 4.206 (2005) requires each school district’s School Health Advisory Council to annually administer the CDC’s SHI: A Self-Assessment and Planning Guide and report a summary to the state.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Texas Education Code 28.002 (2007) requires students in grades K-5 to participate in daily physical activity for at least 30 minutes throughout the school year. This may be accomplished through the physical education curriculum or daily recess. Students in grades 6-8 are required to participate for at least 30 minutes for at least four semesters. If this is impractical due to scheduling or other factors, the district may require a student to participate in moderate or vigorous physical activity for 135 minutes per week or 225 minutes per 2 weeks on a block schedule. State Board of Education Administrative Code 74.11 (1997) allows for temporary or permanent medical exemption. It also gives school districts permission to allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for credit toward the high school graduation requirements.

Waivers may be granted for credit to individual students for involvement in high-quality private or commercially sponsored programs (minimum of 5 hours per week) and those in Olympic-level physical training (15 hours per week).

The graduation requirements state that the following activities can be substituted for the physical education requirement: drill team, marching band, cheerleading, JROTC, athletics, dance I-IV, and approved private programs and certain career and technical education courses.
Education Code 28.002 (2009) requires a physical education curriculum that is sequential, developmentally appropriate, and designed, implemented, and evaluated to enable students to develop the motor, self-management, and other skills necessary to participate in physical activity throughout life. State Board of Education Administrative Code 74.1 (2004) requires each school district offering K-12 to adopt a physical education curriculum. State Board of Education Administrative Codes 116.1 to 116.52 (1998) describe the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Physical Education. Education Code 38.101 (2007) requires a school district to assess the physical fitness of students enrolled in grades 3-12. Students with a disability are exempt from this requirement.

Education Code 38.103 (2007) requires the school district to provide summarized results to the Department of Education.
No state policy.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
One credit of physical education to receive a high school diploma according to State Board of Education Administrative Code 74.51 (2003). No state policy; however, Education Code 28.004 (2003) requires the local School Health Advisory Council to consider and make policy recommendations to the district concerning the importance of daily recess for elementary school students. Texas Administrative Code 76.1001 (2003) states that an extracurricular activity is an activity sponsored by the school district that is not necessarily directly related to instruction of essential knowledge and skills but may have an indirect relation to some areas of the curriculum. Transportation Code 201.614 (2001) establishes a Safe Routes to School program within the Department of Transportation. The state Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Division, has implemented mandatory guidelines via the Texas Public School Nutrition Policy (2004) that local wellness policies are required to meet (and are encouraged to surpass).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Utah According to R277-700.3 (2004), the state Board of Education requires instruction in physical education in grades K-2 (as a part of integrated curriculum) and grades 3-6, and one credit in physical education in middle school. No state policy. The Physical Education Core—Secondary (2005) and Physical Education Core—Elementary (1997) sets standards for students in grades K-12 to receive instruction in physical education and activity. No state policy. The minimum requirement for prospective physical education teachers in elementary grades prior to licensure is a bachelor’s degree, with no additional coursework in health.

For prospective teachers in middle or high school, a candidate is required to have a major or state endorsement in physical education, in addition to a bachelor’s degree.

Vermont 16 Vermont Statute Annotated 906 (1998) requires public schools to provide students with a physical education course of study, although duration and frequency are not specified.

The Nutrition and Physical Fitness Guidelines (2005) recommend 150 minutes per week of physical education for elementary students and 225 minutes per week for middle and high school students.
No state policy. The Vermont Physical Education Grade Expectations (2004) set health knowledge and skills standards for students in grades PreK-12. Standard 2 requires students to learn to identify healthy behaviors and learn the benefit of exercise. The Vermont Physical Education Grade Expectations (2004) require student assessment in physical education (Fitnessgram® or other nationally accredited test) for grades 5-12. Board Rules 5440-08, 5441, and 5445 (2005) require a bachelor’s degree in physical education and a practicum in physical education at the appropriate grade level.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
1.5 credits in physical education. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. The Utah legislature passed a resolution urging schools, school districts, health care providers, community-based organizations, businesses, and families to work with the legislature to establish comprehensive wellness policies to help prevent and reduce the prevalence of overweight children and adolescents.

The State Board of Education Manual of Rules and Practices (2006) requires 1 year of physical education. The Nutrition and Physical Fitness Guidelines (2005) recommend daily recess for grades PreK-8. The guidelines also recommend that recess and physical activity breaks not be taken away as a form of discipline. No state policy. No state policy. The Commissioner of Education and the state school boards association created the Nutrition and Fitness Policy Guidelines (2004), a model school fitness and nutrition policy consistent with 16 Vermont Statute Annotated 216 (2004).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Virginia Code 22.1-207 (1991) requires that physical and health education be emphasized throughout the public school curriculum, but the statute does not specify grade levels or amounts of instructional time. No state policy. The Health Education Standards of Learning (2008) require students in grades K-10 to be able to explain good health and the benefits of physical activity and fitness and the role of regular physical activity. The Physical Education Standards of Learning (2008) require a standardized physical assessment of students in grades 4-12. 8 Virginia Administrative Code 20-21-280 (1998) states the minimum requirements as graduation from a teacher preparation program in health and physical education or completion of a major in health and physical education or 45 semester hours of coursework in the areas specified in the code.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
8 Virginia Administrative Code 20-131-50 (2000) requires 2 credits in health and physical education (out of 22). State Board Rule 8 Virginia Administrative Code 20-131-200 (2006) requires elementary schools to provide students with daily recess during the school year as determined appropriate by the school. Code 22.1-276.3 (2005) requires any organization governing interscholastic activities in public high schools to develop, implement, and enforce rules stating that any school athletic team member determined to have used anabolic steroids. No state policy. The Superintendent of Public Instruction issued a memo asking each school division (district) to report on the status of the local wellness policy as part of the required School Health Advisory Board Annual Report.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Washington Revised Code of Washington 28A.230.040 (1984) requires every student in grades 1-8 to receive instruction in physical education.

Revised Code of Washington 28A.210.365 2007) states that a goal of Washington state is to ensure that by 2010 all students in grades 1-9 should have at least 150 minutes of quality physical education every week.
Revised Code of Washington 28A.230.040 allows only those students who have a physical disability or religious belief or who participate in directed athletics to be excused from instruction in physical education.

Revised Code of Washington 28A.210.365 (2007) states that a goal of Washington state is to ensure that, beginning with the 2011-2012 school year, any district waiver or exemption policy from physical education requirements for high school students should be based on meeting both health and fitness curricula concepts as well as alternative means of engaging in physical activity and but should acknowledge students’ interest in pursuing their academic interests.
The Essential Academic Learning Requirements for Health and Fitness (2003) set requirements for physical education for grades 5 and 8 and high school. Fitness assessments mandatory in 2008-2009 for middle and high school grades and in 2009-2010 for elementary grades. The minimum requirement for prospective physical education teachers in high school is a bachelor’s degree, with at least 30 semester hours in physical education.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
Washington Administrative Code 180-51-061 (2001): Beginning July 1, 2004, students who enter the 9th grade or begin the equivalent of a 4-year high school program will be required to complete two credits of health and fitness courses (out of 19 required credits).

Details are also provided in High School Graduation Requirements (2004).
No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. Revised Code of Washington 28A.210.360 (Senate Bill 5436, 2004) requires districts to adopt local wellness policies and mandates the creation of a model policy and recommendations consistent with and above the federal requirements by a broad-based advisory committee.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
West Virginia Code 18-2-7a (2005) requires students in elementary school to participate in at least 30 minutes of physical education at least 3 days a week, and requires at least one full period of physical education in middle school. Code 18-2-7a (2005) allows the state to grant waivers to school districts regarding physical education time requirements.

The waiver allows districts to develop alternative programs if schools do not have the required number of certified physical education instructors or adequate physical setting to meet the state requirements.
State Board Policy 2520.6 (2003) provides content standards and objectives for physical education but does not mandate any specific curriculum. Code 18-2-7a requires the state board to prescribe a program within the existing health and physical education program that incorporates fitness testing, reporting, recognition, and fitness events and incentive programs and that requires participation in grades 4-8 and the required high school course. Per Board Policy 5202 (2004), the minimum requirement for prospective physical education teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor’s degree.

Wisconsin Statute 121.02 (2001) and school district standards require physical education at least three times per week for grades K-6, weekly for middle school, and three courses in grades 9-12. No state policy. The Department of Public Instruction provides guidance for schools in its voluntary Physical Education Standards (2010).

Schools are not required to use a specific curriculum program.
No state policy. To qualify for a license to teach physical education, an applicant must complete a program that incorporates Wisconsin’s model academic standards for physical education and assists prospective educators in developing specific competencies according to Administrative Code PI 34.30 (2000).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
At least one full course credit of physical education for students in high school. No state policy. Board Policy 2436.10 (1984) outlines the requirements for participating in nonacademic activities in grades 7-12. No state policy. State Board of Education Policy 4321.1 (2008) and Statute 126-86-12 (2008) outline requirements of local wellness policies that county boards of education are required to follow. These exceed the federal requirements.

Code PI 18.03 (1986) and Statute 118.33(1) a (1) require 1.5 credits in physical education to be completed over 3 years. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. The Department of Public Instruction published School Wellness Policy: Broadening the Policy (2005), which puts pertinent state statutes and policies into context within Section 204 requirements and promotes a coordinated school health plan approach to wellness based on CDC guidance documents.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
State State Statute and/or Policy Waivers Curriculum Assessment Certification
Wyoming Rule 5218, Chapter 31 (2003) requires all public school children in grades 1-8 to be proficient in physical education as mandated by the state board in the Wyoming Health Education Content and Performance Standards (2008). No state policy. The Wyoming Physical Education Content and Performance Standards (2008) set benchmarks for standards that students must master in the grade spans of K-4, 5-8, and 9-12.

While a curriculum framework is provided, specific courses, materials, or instructional methodology are not mandated by the state.
No state policy. The minimum requirement for prospective physical educators in the elementary and middle grades prior to licensure is a bachelor’s degree, with 27 hours in the applicable content area.

For prospective teachers in high school, the state requires a bachelor’s degree, with an endorsement in physical education as specified in Section 12 of Rule 4897, Chapter 7 (2002).
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
×
Graduation Requirement Recess Athletics Walk/Bike Wellness Policy
Proficiency in physical education. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy. No state policy.


Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: State Legislative Policies on Physical Education and Physical Activity." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18314.
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Next: Appendix D: Workshop and Panel Public Sessions »
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Physical inactivity is a key determinant of health across the lifespan. A lack of activity increases the risk of heart disease, colon and breast cancer, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, anxiety and depression and others diseases. Emerging literature has suggested that in terms of mortality, the global population health burden of physical inactivity approaches that of cigarette smoking. The prevalence and substantial disease risk associated with physical inactivity has been described as a pandemic.

The prevalence, health impact, and evidence of changeability all have resulted in calls for action to increase physical activity across the lifespan. In response to the need to find ways to make physical activity a health priority for youth, the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Physical Activity and Physical Education in the School Environment was formed. Its purpose was to review the current status of physical activity and physical education in the school environment, including before, during, and after school, and examine the influences of physical activity and physical education on the short and long term physical, cognitive and brain, and psychosocial health and development of children and adolescents.

Educating the Student Body makes recommendations about approaches for strengthening and improving programs and policies for physical activity and physical education in the school environment. This report lays out a set of guiding principles to guide its work on these tasks. These included: recognizing the benefits of instilling life-long physical activity habits in children; the value of using systems thinking in improving physical activity and physical education in the school environment; the recognition of current disparities in opportunities and the need to achieve equity in physical activity and physical education; the importance of considering all types of school environments; the need to take into consideration the diversity of students as recommendations are developed.

This report will be of interest to local and national policymakers, school officials, teachers, and the education community, researchers, professional organizations, and parents interested in physical activity, physical education, and health for school-aged children and adolescents.

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