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National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop (2013)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
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Appendix C

Biographical Sketches of
Steering Committee Members
and Workshop Presenters

STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Karen Kafadar is Rudy professor of statistics in the College of Arts and Sciences at Indiana University. Previously, she held positions at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the RF/Microwave R&D Department at Hewlett-Packard, the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute, and the University of Colorado, Denver. Her research focuses on robust methods, exploratory data analysis, and characterization of uncertainty in the physical, chemical, biological, and engineering sciences, and on methodology for the analysis of screening trials. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and is an elected member of the International Statistics Institute. She holds a B.S. in mathematics and an M.S. in statistics from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in statistics from Princeton University.

William B. Bonvillian is director of the Washington, DC, office of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Previously, he served as legislative director and chief counsel to U.S. Senator Joseph Lieberman. In these positions, his work has focused on national science policy, particularly in relation to research and development, technology, and innovation. Earlier in his career, he was a partner at a large national law firm and served as the deputy assistant secretary and director of congressional affairs at the U.S. Department of Transportation, where he worked on major transportation deregulation legislation.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×

Fernando Galindo-Rueda leads the science, technology, and innovation indicators unit in the Economic Analysis and Statistics Division of OECD’s Directorate for Science, Technology, and Industry. He is responsible for supporting the work of the OECD Working Party of National Experts on Science and Technology Indicators where he coordinates the upkeep and further development of the Frascati family of internationally adopted statistical standards for the measurement of research and development, innovation, and technology and the publication of OECD publications in this area. Prior to joining the OECD, he was deputy director of business economics at the United Kingdom’s Department of Economic Analysis. Previously, he also held positions in the UK Office for National Statistics and at the London School of Economics. He has a Ph.D. in economics from University College, London.

Christopher T. Hill is a professor in the School of Public Policy at George Mason University. His primary interests are in the history, design, evaluation, and politics of federal policies and programs intended to stimulate technological innovation in the commercial marketplace. He previously served as vice provost for research at George Mason University and held senior positions at the RAND Corporation, the National Research Council, the Congressional Research Service, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment.

Joel L. Horowitz is the Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison professor of economics in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University. Prior to this position, he was on the faculty of the Department of Economics at the University of Iowa and a senior operations research analyst for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. His areas of interest are nonparametric and semiparametric methods. He has a B.S. in physics from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in physics from Cornell University.

David Newman is an associate research faculty member in the Department of Computer Science of the University of California, Irvine. His research interests are in machine learning, topic modeling, and text mining. He has received a Google Research Award for his work in topic mapping. He has a Ph.D. from Princeton University.

Stephanie S. Shipp is a research staff member at the Science and Technology Policy Institute at the Institute for Defense Analyses in Washington, DC. She specializes in the assessment of science and technology projects, programs, and portfolios. Her research involves innovation and competive-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×

ness with recent emphasis on advanced manufacturing, the role of federal laboratories, and funding of high risk/high reward research. Previously, she was director of the Economic Assessment Office in the Advanced Technology Program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and held positions at the U.S. Census Bureau, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the Federal Reserve Board. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She holds a B.A. from Trinity College, Washington, DC, and a Ph.D. in economics from George Washington University.

Eric V. Slud is a mathematical statistician at the Center for Statistical Research and Methodology at the U.S. Census Bureau. His previous position was as a professor in the statistics program at the University of Maryland. His areas of interest include stochastic processes, survival methods, and survey methodology. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association.

Howard Wainer is distinguished research scientist for the National Board of Medical Examiners in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Previously, he served on the faculty of the University of Chicago, at the Bureau of Social Science Research, and as a principal research scientist in the Research Statistics Group at the Educational Testing Service. He has a long-standing interest in the use of graphical methods for data analysis and communication, robust statistical methodology, and the development and application of item response theory. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the American Educational Research Association. He holds a Ph.D. from Princeton University.

WORKSHOP PRESENTERS

Jeff Alexander is a senior science and technology policy analyst with SRI International. His research focuses on the areas of technology analysis, national and regional innovation policy, corporate and government research and development management, and collaborative innovation networks. Prior to joining SRI International, he was chief knowledge officer at New Economy Strategies, an economic development consulting firm, and vice president and director of research at Washington CORE, which provides technology market research and policy analysis to numerous international clients. He holds a B.A. in international relations from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in management and technology from the George Washington University School of Business.

Mark Boroush is project officer in the Research and Development Statistics Program for the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES) of the National Science Foundation. At NCSES, Boroush is respon-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×

sible for national statistics and analysis on the status of the U.S. science and engineering enterprise, including the contributions to the nation’s economy. Prior to his position at NCSES, Boroush was a senior policy analyst in the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Technology Administration, where he was a member of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Inter-agency Working Group on the Science of Science Policy. Before that, Boroush was the principal U.S. government delegate to the OECD’s Working Party on Innovation and Technology Policy. He also worked at the National Institutes of Health and the Office of Technology Assessment. Boroush started out as a biochemist in basic life sciences research at Harvard University and the University of Michigan. His B.A. was from Case Western Reserve University. He also received a master’s degree in economics and public policy from the University of Michigan.

Daniel Carr is a professor of statistics in the Volgenau School of Information Technology and Engineering at George Mason University. His principal research interests are in the fields of statistical graphics and visual analytics for use in communication, data exploration, hypothesis generation, and model criticism. He holds a B.A. from Whitman College, a master’s degree in education from Idaho State University, and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin.

Kaye Husbands Fealing is a study director with the Committee on National Statistics at the National Research Council and the William Brough professor of economics at Williams College. Previously, she was a visiting professor at the Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota and served as a program director in the economics program at the U.S. National Science Foundation. She holds a B.A. in mathematics and economics from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

Julie Gershunskaya is a mathematical statistician at the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Her areas of interest include survey sampling methodology, small-area estimation, robust estimation, and resampling methods. She has recently applied these methods to survey data on the Current Employment Statistics. She has a number of achievement awards from BLS and the U.S. Department of Labor. Dr. Gershunskaya received her B.S. and M.S. in mathematics from Moscow State University, and her Ph.D. in survey methodology from the University of Maryland, College Park.

David Goldston is director of government affairs for the Natural Resources Defense Council in Washington, DC. Previously, he held various positions on Capitol Hill, working primarily on science and environmental policy,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×

and he served as chief of staff of the House Committee on Science. He has been a visiting lecturer at Princeton and Harvard Universities and a columnist for the journal Nature. He has a B.A. in history and has completed the course work for a Ph.D. in American history at the University of Pennsylvania.

Martin Grueber is a research leader for the technology partnership practice at Battelle. In this position, he coauthors the annual Battelle/R&D Magazine global research and development funding forecast. He previously worked as deputy director of the Rhode Island Economic Policy Council, manager of the Samuel Slater Technology Fund, and manager of the research staff for the Industrial Technology Institute. He has a B.S. in social science and an M.A. in geography from Michigan State University.

John Jankowski is director of the Research and Development (R&D) Statistics Program in the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). His work has included the implementation of several major federal statistical R&D initiatives, including development of an R&D satellite account to the U.S. System of National Accounts, the collection of academic and biomedical cyberinfrastructure statistics, and conceptualization of the government’s first data-linking project to track global R&D investments. Prior to joining NSF, he served as assistant director for strategic and policy analysis at the Distilled Spirits Council and as an economics researcher on energy and mineral issues at Resources for the Future. He holds degrees from Georgetown University and the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies.

John L. King is the acting director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Office of the Chief Scientist and senior advisor for Agricultural Economics and Rural Communities, on detail from the Resource Environment and Science Policy Branch of the USDA Economic Research Service. His research has focused on innovation and science policy, including the influence of intellectual property, industry structure, and knowledge flows on public and private decision making in agricultural research and development. He has served on the National Science and Technology Council’s interagency working group on Science of Science Policy and the Research in Engineering Education Science Performance Team since 2006, and more recently has been active in USDA implementation of the STAR METRICS initiative to develop new ways to examine the reach and impact of federal science. He codeveloped the Agricultural Biotechnology Intellectual Property database (http://www.ers.usda.gov/data/agbiotechip), a tool to examine industry structure and intellectual property ownership, and has collaborated with other science agencies on analyzing technology transfer

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×

policies and developing assessments of the economic impact of research. Prior to joining USDA in 1999, Dr. King received B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Vanderbilt University.

Kei Koizumi is assistant director for federal research and development (R&D) at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Before joining OSTP, he served as the director of the R&D Budget and Policy Program at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) where he was the principal budget analyst, editor, and writer for the annual AAAS reports on federal R&D and for the continually updated analyses of federal R&D on the AAAS R&D website. He holds a B.A. in political science and economics from Boston University and an M.A. from the Center for International Science, Technology, and Public Policy at George Washington University.

Charles Larson is president of the Industrial Research Institute, Inc., a Washington, DC-based association of some 265 companies that perform research and development in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and abroad. He is a registered professional engineer and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Purdue University and an M.B.A. from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

David Mowery is William A. and Betty H. Hasler professor of new enterprise development at the Walter A. Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Previously, he taught at Carnegie Mellon University. His research deals with the economics of technological innovation and the effects of public policies on innovation. His academic awards include the Raymond Vernon Prize from the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, the Economic History Association’s Fritz Redlich Prize, the Business History Review’s Newcomen Prize, and the Cheit Outstanding Teaching Award. He received undergraduate and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Stanford University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×
Page 104
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2013. National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18317.
×
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National Patterns of R&D Resources is an annual report issued by the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES) of the National Science Foundation, which provides a national view of current 'patterns' in funding of R&D activities in government, industry, academia, federally funded research and development centers, and non-profits. Total R&D funds are broken out at the national level by type of provider, type of recipient, and whether the R&D is basic, applied, or developmental. These patterns are compared both longitudinally versus historical R&D amounts, and internationally.

This report series, which is based on input from several censuses and surveys, is used to formulate policies that, e.g., might increase incentives to support different types, sources, or recipients of R&D than is currently the case. To communicate these R&D patterns, each report is composed of a set of tabulations of national R&D disaggregated by type of donor, type of recipient, and type of R&D. While this satisfies many key user groups, the question was whether some modifications of the report could attract a wider user community and at the same time provide more useful information for current users.

National Patterns of R&D Resources: Future Directions for Content and Methods addresses the following questions: (1) what additional topics and tabulations could be presented without modifying the current portfolio of R&D censuses and surveys, (2) what additional topics and tabulations might be presented by expanding these current data collections, (3) what could be done to enhance international comparability of the tabulations, (4) since much of the information on non-profit R&D providers and recipients is estimated from 15 year-old data, what impact might this be having on the quality of the associated National Patterns tabulations, (5) what statistical models could be used to support the issuance R&D estimates at state-level and geographic regions below the national level, (6) what use could be made from the recent development of administrative sources of R&D information, and finally, (7) what graphical tools could be added to the current tabulations to enhance the communication of R&D patterns to the users of this series of publications.

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