National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendixes
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Charge to the Committee." National Research Council. 2013. High Magnetic Field Science and Its Application in the United States: Current Status and Future Directions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18355.
×

A

Charge to the Committee

The committee will assess the needs of the U.S. research community for high magnetic fields. The committee will determine the status and identify trends in the use of high magnetic fields throughout science and technology.

1. What is the current state of high-field magnet science, engineering, and technology in the United States, and are there any conspicuous needs to be addressed?

2. What are the current science drivers and which scientific opportunities and challenges can be anticipated over the next ten years?

3. What are the principal existing and planned high magnetic field facilities outside of the United States, what roles have U.S. high-field magnet development efforts played in developing those facilities, and what potentials exist for further international collaboration in this area?

Based on this assessment, the committee will provide guidance for the future of both magnetic-field research and technology development in the United States. It will address trends in the disciplinary makeup of the user base and consider how the infrastructure should be optimized to meet the needs of the next decades.

1. On what areas of magnetic field research and development should the United States focus its efforts over the next decade?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Charge to the Committee." National Research Council. 2013. High Magnetic Field Science and Its Application in the United States: Current Status and Future Directions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18355.
×

2. What new capabilities should be provided in the United States (taking into account worldwide capabilities and any potential for international collaborations or cooperative arrangements)?

3. What is the best model for the infrastructure supporting high magnetic field science in the United States? Among the issues the committee might consider addressing are-

i. To what extent should facilities be centralized?

ii. Would the program benefit from distributing a portion of the high magnetic field capability to other locations?

iii. How should the issue of providing magnetic fields to light source and neutron facilities be handled? Conversely, what experimental capabilities should be co-located at high field labs?

iv. For facilities that remain centralized, should the programs remain divided among the current three locations or be combined?

v. What are the trends in providing support for outside users versus supporting in-house independent research programs and do those trends optimally meet the needs of the user base?

4. What is the best infrastructure model for supporting high magnetic field technology development and U.S. industrial competitiveness?

5. How can the operational and financial stewardship of the research and facilities be optimized to address changes in the disciplinary spectrum and user needs?

In responding to these questions, the committee may make recommendations on organizational structure, program balance, and funding.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Charge to the Committee." National Research Council. 2013. High Magnetic Field Science and Its Application in the United States: Current Status and Future Directions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18355.
×
Page 169
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Charge to the Committee." National Research Council. 2013. High Magnetic Field Science and Its Application in the United States: Current Status and Future Directions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18355.
×
Page 170
Next: Appendix B: Input from the Community »
High Magnetic Field Science and Its Application in the United States: Current Status and Future Directions Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $50.00 Buy Ebook | $40.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The Committee to Assess the Current Status and Future Direction of High Magnetic Field Science in the United States was convened by the National Research Council in response to a request by the National Science Foundation. This report answers three questions: (1) What is the current state of high-field magnet science, engineering, and technology in the United States, and are there any conspicuous needs to be addressed? (2) What are the current science drivers and which scientific opportunities and challenges can be anticipated over the next ten years? (3) What are the principal existing and planned high magnetic field facilities outside of the United States, what roles have U.S. high field magnet development efforts played in developing those facilities, and what potentials exist for further international collaboration in this area?

A magnetic field is produced by an electrical current in a metal coil. This current exerts an expansive force on the coil, and a magnetic field is "high" if it challenges the strength and current-carrying capacity of the materials that create the field. Although lower magnetic fields can be achieved using commercially available magnets, research in the highest achievable fields has been, and will continue to be, most often performed in large research centers that possess the materials and systems know-how for forefront research. Only a few high field centers exist around the world; in the United States, the principal center is the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL).

High Magnetic Field Science and Its Application in the United States considers continued support for a centralized high-field facility such as NHFML to be the highest priority. This report contains a recommendation for the funding and siting of several new high field nuclear magnetic resonance magnets at user facilities in different regions of the United States. Continued advancement in high-magnetic field science requires substantial investments in magnets with enhanced capabilities. High Magnetic Field Science and Its Application in the United States contains recommendations for the further development of all-superconducting, hybrid, and higher field pulsed magnets that meet ambitious but achievable goals.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!