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Developing Capacities for Teaching Responsible Science in the MENA Region: Refashioning Scientific Dialogue (2013)

Chapter: Appendix B: Background on The World Academy of Sciences and the Bibliotheca Alexandrina: The Bibliotheca Alexandrina and The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), for the Advancement of the Developing World

« Previous: Appendix A: Recommendations from the Warsaw Workshop Report: *Challenges and Opportunities forEducation about Dual Use Issues in the Life Sciences*
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Background on The World Academy of Sciences and the Bibliotheca Alexandrina: The Bibliotheca Alexandrina and The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), for the Advancement of the Developing World." National Research Council. 2013. Developing Capacities for Teaching Responsible Science in the MENA Region: Refashioning Scientific Dialogue. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18356.
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Appendix B

The Bibliotheca Alexandrina and The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), for the Advancement of the Developing World

BIBLIOTHECA ALEXANDRINA61

The New Library of Alexandria [inaugurated in 2002], the New Bibliotheca Alexandrina is dedicated to recapture the spirit of openness and scholarship of the original Bibliotheca Alexandrina. Its mission is

to be a center of excellence for the production and dissemination of knowledge, and to be a place of dialogue and understanding between cultures and peoples.

It is our hope that the New Bibliotheca Alexandrina will be a worthy successor to the Ancient Library of Alexandria. That great Library was a unique ecumenical effort of the human intellect and imagination, and remains engraved in the memories of all scientists and intellectuals to this day.

The Ancient Library is undeniably the greatest chapter in the history of Alexandria. Our great city, founded by Alexander and home to Cleopatra, has had a remarkable history of 2300 years. It is a city of living history and renewed imagination that has inspired creative talents from Callimachus to Lawrence Durrell. In addition, the past is suddenly coming alive as underwater archaeology is bringing to light the sunken treasures of Alexandria, capturing the imagination of the world with glimpses of bygone glory.

That is the setting for the New Library of Alexandria. The beautiful new building, with its distinctive granite wall covered by the letters of all the world’s alphabets, is today a recognizable landmark of the new Alexandria.

Before we turn to the future, it is only fitting that we should salute all those whose vision and dreams launched this great enterprise more than quarter-of-a-century ago, from UNESCO to the architects and engineers, and contractors, from the management of the project to the workers who labored in the quarries, from the Associations of Friends of the Library all over the world to the eminent people who served on international commissions, from the generous Government donations to the many individual donations. All must be thanked for having brought us to this important achievement.

The four objectives of the New Bibliotheca Alexandrina are to be:

   1.  The window of the world on Egypt;

______________________

61 This material is taken from the “Director’s Message” on the Library’s website (www.bibalex.org/aboutus/message_en.aspx.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Background on The World Academy of Sciences and the Bibliotheca Alexandrina: The Bibliotheca Alexandrina and The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), for the Advancement of the Developing World." National Research Council. 2013. Developing Capacities for Teaching Responsible Science in the MENA Region: Refashioning Scientific Dialogue. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18356.
×

   2.  The window of Egypt on the world;

   3.  An instrument for rising to the digital challenge;

   4.  A center for dialogue between peoples and civilizations;

The way forward is difficult and challenging. The Library seeks to establish itself as an international center of excellence. In terms of our collections strategy, we focus on: First, the Ancient Library of Alexandria, Alexandria and Egypt; Second, the Mediterranean, the Arab world (without duplicating other efforts underway) and Africa, then the rest of the world. In terms of thematic focus, the Bibliotheca Alexandrina’s specialized centers and departments undertake a number of specific projects and activities which complement and support one another in a coherent fashion. These projects all contribute to the BA’s mission.

The means to move forward is partnering with many eminent institutions of learning around the world, either in an ongoing manner or around specific events such as seminars, conferences and exhibitions. Equally important to these links with eminent institutions are the links to the civil society in Egypt and the world. It is here that the 34 Associations of Friends of the Library have an invaluable role to play.

It is also challenging to link up electronically with the rest of world. We have already put together a complex web of agreements to bring the marvels of the digital age to all parts of Egypt and the region, and to bring the fruits of Egyptian creativity and scholarship to the new digital world of instant communications and electronic publishing.

Supported by the Council of Patrons, guided by the Board of Trustees, and in constant touch with the Friends of the Library of Alexandria, in Egypt and all over the world, the staff of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina are moving forward to build, over the years to come, an institution worthy of bearing that great name. We hope it will indeed be “a source of pride for Egypt and the world”.

Ismail Serageldin
Librarian of Alexandria

THE WORLD ACADEMY OF SCIENCES (TWAS)62

TWAS is an autonomous international organization, founded in 1983 in Trieste, Italy, by a distinguished group of scientists from the South under the leadership of the late Nobel laureate Abdus Salam of Pakistan. It was officially launched by the secretary-general of the United Nations in 1985.

TWAS represents the best of science in developing countries. Its main mission is to promote scientific excellence and capacity in the South for science-based sustainable development.

The Academy's strength resides in the quality and diversity of its membership - internationally renowned scientists elected by their peers. TWAS Fellows, who live and work in developing countries, represent 85 percent of the membership; TWAS Associate Fellows live and work in developed countries. The current membership stands at 1073 [15 January 2013].

A Council, elected every three years by TWAS members, is responsible for the Academy's broad policy and programmatic directions. The Secretariat, headed by an executive director and located on the premises of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy, assists the

______________________

62 The material is taken from the TWAS website (http://twas.ictp.it/about/whats-twas). The new name of the organization, formerly the Third World Academy of Sciences and then briefly TWAS, the academy of sciences for the developing world, was adopted in September 2012.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Background on The World Academy of Sciences and the Bibliotheca Alexandrina: The Bibliotheca Alexandrina and The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), for the Advancement of the Developing World." National Research Council. 2013. Developing Capacities for Teaching Responsible Science in the MENA Region: Refashioning Scientific Dialogue. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18356.
×

Council in the administration and coordination of the programmes.

In 1991, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) assumed responsibility for administering TWAS funds and personnel on the basis of an agreement signed by TWAS and UNESCO. In 2004, the Italian government passed a law that ensures a continuous financial contribution to the Academy's operation. Representatives of the Italian government and UNESCO are members of the TWAS Steering Committee, which meets annually to discuss financial matters.

In addition to its strong links with UNESCO and ICTP, TWAS provides administrative support for the Organization of Women in Science for the Developing World, IAP—The Global Network of Science Academies, and the Inter Academy Medical Panel). The Academy also maintains close ties with academies, research councils and ministries of science and technology in developing countries.

Objectives

    •  Recognize, support and promote excellence in scientific research in the developing world;

    •  Respond to the needs of young scientists in S&T-lagging developing countries;

    •  Promote South-South and South-North cooperation in science, technology and innovation;

    •  Encourage scientific research and sharing of experiences in solving major problems facing developing countries.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Background on The World Academy of Sciences and the Bibliotheca Alexandrina: The Bibliotheca Alexandrina and The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), for the Advancement of the Developing World." National Research Council. 2013. Developing Capacities for Teaching Responsible Science in the MENA Region: Refashioning Scientific Dialogue. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18356.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Background on The World Academy of Sciences and the Bibliotheca Alexandrina: The Bibliotheca Alexandrina and The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), for the Advancement of the Developing World." National Research Council. 2013. Developing Capacities for Teaching Responsible Science in the MENA Region: Refashioning Scientific Dialogue. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18356.
×
Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Background on The World Academy of Sciences and the Bibliotheca Alexandrina: The Bibliotheca Alexandrina and The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), for the Advancement of the Developing World." National Research Council. 2013. Developing Capacities for Teaching Responsible Science in the MENA Region: Refashioning Scientific Dialogue. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18356.
×
Page 106
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Background on The World Academy of Sciences and the Bibliotheca Alexandrina: The Bibliotheca Alexandrina and The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), for the Advancement of the Developing World." National Research Council. 2013. Developing Capacities for Teaching Responsible Science in the MENA Region: Refashioning Scientific Dialogue. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18356.
×
Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Background on The World Academy of Sciences and the Bibliotheca Alexandrina: The Bibliotheca Alexandrina and The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), for the Advancement of the Developing World." National Research Council. 2013. Developing Capacities for Teaching Responsible Science in the MENA Region: Refashioning Scientific Dialogue. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18356.
×
Page 108
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Spurred on by new discoveries and rapid technological advances, the capacity for life science research is expanding across the globe—and with it comes concerns about the unintended impacts of research on the physical and biological environment, human well-being, or the deliberate misuse of knowledge, tools, and techniques to cause harm. This report describes efforts to address dual use issues by developing institutes around the world that will help life sciences faculty learn to teach about the responsible conduct of science. Based on the successful National Academies Summer Institute for Undergraduate Biology Education and on previous NRC reports on effective methods for teaching about dual use issues, the report's authoring committee designed a general framework for the faculty institutes and chose the Middle East-North Africa (MENA) region to test a prototype faculty institute.

In September 2012, the first Institute was held in Aqaba, Jordan, bringing together 28 participants from Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, and Yemen to engage with effective, evidence-based teaching methods, develop curricular materials for use in their own classrooms, and become community leaders on dual use and related topics. Developing Capacities for Teaching Responsible Science in the MENA Region: Refashioning Scientific Dialogue offers insights from the institute that will help in the design and implementation of future programs in the MENA region, and in other parts of the world.

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