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Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards (2014)

Chapter: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
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A
WORKSHOP AGENDA

Workshop on Developing Assessments to Meet the Goals of the 2012 Framework for K-12 Science Education

September 13, 2012

National Academy of Sciences Building 2101 Constitution Ave., NW

Auditorium

Washington DC

AGENDA

8:30 Registration, check-in for workshop
 
9:00-9:15 Welcome, Introductions, Overview of the Agenda
(9:00) Stuart Elliott, Director, Board on Testing and Assessment
(9:05) Martin Storksdieck, Director, Board on Science Education
(9:10) David Heil, Collaborative Mentor, CCSSO’s State Collaborative on Assessment and Student Standards (SCASS) in Science
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
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Part I: Problem Statement: Laying Out the Problem/Challenges

This session will review the Framework and what it calls for and discuss the challenges that it poses for assessment.

Moderator: Mark Wilson, University of California at Berkeley, Committee Cochair

 
9:15-10:15 What is the vision of learning and instruction laid out in the Framework? What are the implications for assessment?
(9:15) Helen Quinn, Stanford University, Committee Member
(9:35) Jim Pellegrino, University of Illinois at Chicago, Committee Cochair
 
Reactions and Questions
(9:55) James Woodland, Nebraska Department of Education
(10:00) Robin Anglin, West Virginia Department of Education
(10:05) Audience Q and A
 
10:15-10:30 Break

Part II: Exploring Alternatives: Strategies for Assessing Learning as Envisioned in the Framework

Assessing the proficiencies depicted in the Framework will require changes to the status quo. Innovative assessment formats and technology enhancements may offer the means for assessing some of the skills and performances on large-scale, external tests. Some of the skills and performances may not be well suited to large-scale, external testing formats, but other ways of measuring them may produce results that can be utilized in new ways. This session will focus in detail on some of the alternatives.

 
10:30-12:00 Large-Scale Assessments
In this session a series of panelists will discuss examples of large-scale assessments that assess science practices in conjunction with core ideas and crosscutting concepts, similar to those depicted in the Framework. Focus will be on how these strategies can be used to measure learning as envisioned in the Framework.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
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Moderators:
Catherine Welch, University of Iowa, Committee Member Kathleen Scalise, University of Oregon, Committee Member
 
Presenters will address the following questions:
 

1. How are content knowledge, crosscutting concepts, and science practices assessed in the program? If possible, please provide one or more sample tasks and discuss the content and practices that are assessed.

2. How is the assessment administered? How long does it take and what materials and/or technologies are needed?

3. How are the tasks scored and how are scores reported? Are scores reported separately for content knowledge, crosscutting concepts, and practices or is a composite score created?

4. What steps, if any, are taken to ensure that scores are comparable from one administration to the next?

5. What was involved in developing the assessment tasks/items? What challenges were encountered and how were they handled? Please discuss any practical, cost, or feasibility issues that arose and how they were addressed.

 
(10:30) NAEP 2009 Science Assessment: Hands-On and Interactive Computer Tasks
Alan Friedman, National Assessment Governing Board Peggy Carr, National Center for Education Statistics
(10:50) College Board’s Advanced Placement Tests in Biology
Rosemary Reshetar, College Board
(11:10) SimScientists
Edys Quellmalz, WestEd
 
Reactions and Questions
(11:30) Moderators’ follow-up questions to panelists
(11:40) Yvette McCulley, Iowa Department of Education
(11:50) Audience Q and A
 
12:00-12:45 Lunch in Great Hall
 
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
×
12:45-2:30 Assessments Embedded in Curricular Units
The Framework calls for an approach to instruction and assessment that utilizes learning progressions and associated curricular units. What assessment strategies can be used to measure students’ achievement in relation to a learning progression? What types of activities/tasks allow us to make inferences about where a student is on the progression? This session will feature examples of work to develop assessments of learning progressions in conjunction with curricular units.
 
Moderator: Mark Wilson
(12:45) Introductory Remarks by the Moderator
 
Assessing Science Knowledge That Inextricably Links Core
Disciplinary Ideas and Practices
(1:00) Joe Krajcik, Michigan State University
(1:15) Nancy Butler Songer, University of Michigan, Committee Member
(1:30) Brian Reiser, Northwestern University, Committee Member
(1:45) Rich Lehrer, Vanderbilt University, Committee Member
 
Reactions and Questions
(2:00) Roberta Tanner, Loveland High School, Committee Member
(2:10) Beverly Vance, North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
(2:20) Audience Q and A
 
2:30-3:15 Measurement Challenges
This session will consider the featured sample assessments—both large-scale and curriculum-embedded—and discuss the measurement challenges associated with these approaches. The session will focus on issues such as: (1) to what extent do these approaches offer viable alternatives for assessing science learning consistent with the Framework; (2) to what extent are these approaches likely to yield scores that support the desired inferences and policy purposes; (3) what practical, technical, and psychometric challenges might arise with these approaches?
 
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
×
Moderator: Mark Wilson
(2:30) Ed Haertel, Stanford University, Committee Member
 
Reactions and Questions
(2:50) Anita Bernhardt, Maine Department of Education
(2:57) Jeff Greig, Connecticut State Department of Education
(3:05) Audience Q and A
 
3:15-3:30 Break

Part III: Developing Systems of Assessments

This session will address different strategies for gathering assessment information—some based on summative assessment, some based on end-of-course assessments, and some based on collections of classroom work—and consider how to integrate/combine the information. The session will discuss models used in other countries and settings that provide ways to integrate a broad range of assessment information.

 
3:30-4:30 Moderator: Jerome Shaw, University of California, Santa Cruz,
Committee Member
 
Presenters:
(3:30) Joan Herman, CRESST, Committee Member
(3:45) Knut Neumann, University of Kiel, Committee Member
 
Reactions and Questions:
(4:00) Susan Codere Kelly, Michigan Department of Education
(4:10) Melinda Curless, Kentucky Department of Education
(4:20) Audience Q and A

Part IV: Synthesis

4:30-5:45 Moderators: Jim Pellegrino, Mark Wilson
 
Panel
(4:30) Peter McLaren, Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Committee Member
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
×
(4:40) Richard Amasino, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Committee Member
(4:50) Shelley Lee, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
(5:00) Matt Krehbiel, Kansas State Department of Education
(5:10) Comments from the Moderators
(5:20) Audience Q and A
 
Questions for Discussion

• What are the main takeaway points from the workshop discussions?

• Considering the sample assessments discussed during the workshop, which approaches to assessment seem most promising and consistent with the goals of the Framework? What challenges do they help solve? What challenges would still need to be solved?

• What additional issues should the committee explore?

 
5:45 Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
×
Page 253
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
×
Page 254
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
×
Page 255
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
×
Page 256
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
×
Page 257
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18409.
×
Page 258
Next: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff »
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Assessments, understood as tools for tracking what and how well students have learned, play a critical role in the classroom. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards develops an approach to science assessment to meet the vision of science education for the future as it has been elaborated in A Framework for K-12 Science Education (Framework) and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). These documents are brand new and the changes they call for are barely under way, but the new assessments will be needed as soon as states and districts begin the process of implementing the NGSS and changing their approach to science education.

The new Framework and the NGSS are designed to guide educators in significantly altering the way K-12 science is taught. The Framework is aimed at making science education more closely resemble the way scientists actually work and think, and making instruction reflect research on learning that demonstrates the importance of building coherent understandings over time. It structures science education around three dimensions - the practices through which scientists and engineers do their work, the key crosscutting concepts that cut across disciplines, and the core ideas of the disciplines - and argues that they should be interwoven in every aspect of science education, building in sophistication as students progress through grades K-12.

Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards recommends strategies for developing assessments that yield valid measures of student proficiency in science as described in the new Framework. This report reviews recent and current work in science assessment to determine which aspects of the Framework's vision can be assessed with available techniques and what additional research and development will be needed to support an assessment system that fully meets that vision. The report offers a systems approach to science assessment, in which a range of assessment strategies are designed to answer different kinds of questions with appropriate degrees of specificity and provide results that complement one another.

Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards makes the case that a science assessment system that meets the Framework's vision should consist of assessments designed to support classroom instruction, assessments designed to monitor science learning on a broader scale, and indicators designed to track opportunity to learn. New standards for science education make clear that new modes of assessment designed to measure the integrated learning they promote are essential. The recommendations of this report will be key to making sure that the dramatic changes in curriculum and instruction signaled by Framework and the NGSS reduce inequities in science education and raise the level of science education for all students.

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