National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: APPENDIX I: Dedication of the Wilkins Arctic Test Chamber
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX II: Conference Dinner." National Research Council. 1961. Man Living in the Arctic; Proceedings of a Conference, Quartermaster Research and Engineering Center, Natick, Massachusetts, 1, 2 December 1960. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18436.
×
Page 143
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX II: Conference Dinner." National Research Council. 1961. Man Living in the Arctic; Proceedings of a Conference, Quartermaster Research and Engineering Center, Natick, Massachusetts, 1, 2 December 1960. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18436.
×
Page 144
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX II: Conference Dinner." National Research Council. 1961. Man Living in the Arctic; Proceedings of a Conference, Quartermaster Research and Engineering Center, Natick, Massachusetts, 1, 2 December 1960. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18436.
×
Page 145
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX II: Conference Dinner." National Research Council. 1961. Man Living in the Arctic; Proceedings of a Conference, Quartermaster Research and Engineering Center, Natick, Massachusetts, 1, 2 December 1960. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18436.
×
Page 146
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX II: Conference Dinner." National Research Council. 1961. Man Living in the Arctic; Proceedings of a Conference, Quartermaster Research and Engineering Center, Natick, Massachusetts, 1, 2 December 1960. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18436.
×
Page 147

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Above all he was the champion of the individual soldier in striving to reduce the weight and bulk of what the soldier is expected to carry. We in the Quartermaster Corps stand in great debt to Sir Hubert. We are deeply proud that he chose to spend his last years working in our midst. In recognition of that debt, out of the fullness of that pride, and on behalf of the entire U. S. Army Quartermaster Corps, I hereby dedicate this facility at the Quartermaster Research and Engineering Center as the Wilkins Arctic Test Chamber. Appendix II CONFERENCE DINNER The Boston Museum of Science was the setting for the banquet Thursday evening (1 December 1960). Dr. Parks opened the pro- gram with a general welcome and special recognition for some of the people instrumental in organizing the conference. He then introduced the host, Dr. Washburn, Director of the Museum. Dr. Washburn spoke briefly noting that the great men who pioneered in Arctic exploration laid the foundation upon which present and future knowledge for living in that area can be built and that it is most fitting to turn the clock back briefly to pay tribute to these courageous men. He then turned the program over to the toastmaster, Lowell Thomas. Mr. Thomas, who knows many of the early Arctic explorers per- sonally, did a superb job of describing some of the first explorations including many humorous anecdotes concerning the people involved. He showed slides and films, and with a little help from Dr. Stefanssen, Admiral MacMillan, and Dr. Siple took the audience back to those wonderful days when the Arctic challenged venturesome explorers to seek out her mysteries. Finally he called upon Mrs. MacMillan to say a few words. Having been on nine expeditions herself and with a wonderful wit and ability to tell a good story, Mrs. MacMillan literally brought down the house by relating a number of highly amusing incidents of life with her famous explorer husband. The group left feeling well fed and very well entertained. 143

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council is a private, nonprofit organization of scientists, dedicated to the further- ance of science and to its use for the general welfare. The Academy itself was established in 1863 under a congressional charter signed by President Lincoln. Empowered to provide for all activities appropriate to academies of science, it was also required by its charter to act as an advisor to the Federal Government in scientific matters. This provi- sion accounts for the close ties that have always existed between the Academy and the Government, although the Academy is not a govern- mental agency. The National Research Council was established by the Academy 1916, at the request of President Wilson, to enable scientists general to associate their efforts with those of the limited membership of 1 Academy in service to the nation, to society, and to science at ho and abroad. Members of the National Research Council receive th< appointments from the President of the Academy. They include rep sentatives of the Federal Government, and a number of members large. In addition, several thousand scientists and engineers take p in the activities of the Research Council through membership on various boards and committees. Receiving funds from both public and private sources, by contribu- tion, grant, or contract, the Academy and its Research Council thus work to stimulate research and its applications, to survey the broad possibilities of science, to promote effective utilization of the scientific and technical resources of the country, to serve the Government, and to further the general interests of science. ADVISORY BOARD ON QUARTERMASTER RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Recognizing the need for independent scientific advice on his re- search and development program, the Quartermaster General, in 1943, requested advisory services and for this purpose established a formal contract with the Academy-Research Council. To fulfill the terms of this agreement, the Committee on Quartermaster Problems was organized by the Academy-Research Council under the Division of Engineering and Industrial Research. In 1948, the scope of the Quartermaster advisory activity was broadened, and the committee was reorganized as the Advisory Board on Quartermaster Research and Development. The objective of the Advisory Board on Quartermaster Research and Development and its committees, by providing scientific and tech- nical advisory services to the Quartermaster Research and Engineer- ing Command, Natick, Massachusetts, is to aid the Quartermaster Corps in the moj^^^^j^^^^^uent of the Corps mission—pro- tecting, feeding^ "y~3 "- "^combat soldier in any future emergency.

Man Living in the Arctic; Proceedings of a Conference, Quartermaster Research and Engineering Center, Natick, Massachusetts, 1, 2 December 1960 Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Recent expansion in polar interest has increased the requirements for improved living conditions, food, clothing, and shelter. Solutions, once considered adequate because of their substantial advance over current standards, had to be re-examined in due course for deficiencies. Garments and equipment which required that men be extensively trained in their safe, efficient use or needed elaborate care and maintenance in order to provide optimum protection often were too troublesome or dangerous. New knowledge of human physiological and psychological requirements and adjustments suggested new means of preparing for Arctic living. New materials and devices made new approaches possible. Therefore, the concept of a conference to discuss Man Living in the Arctic was considered desirable by the Army, the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Advisory Board on Quartermaster Research and Development, and The Arctic Institute of North America. Man Living in the Arctic; Proceedings of a Conference, Quartermaster Research and Engineering Center, Natick, Massachusetts, 1, 2 December 1960 is a summary of that conference. This report honors the contributions of our Arctic pioneers, takes stock of our present capabilities, and looks forward to the military and civilian needs of the future. In contrast to the former concept of the Arctic as a hostile wasteland, avoided by all but bold adventurers, this report promotes the idea that we are striving for continued advance of man's successful conquest of an area of the world that will sometime be a populated and essential part of man's habitat.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!