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Medical Technology and the Health Care System: A Study of the Diffusion of Equipment-Embodied Technology (1979)

Chapter: APPENDIX H: PARTICIPANTS AT OPEN MEETING, APRIL 7, 1977

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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX H: PARTICIPANTS AT OPEN MEETING, APRIL 7, 1977." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 1979. Medical Technology and the Health Care System: A Study of the Diffusion of Equipment-Embodied Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18439.
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Page 303
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX H: PARTICIPANTS AT OPEN MEETING, APRIL 7, 1977." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 1979. Medical Technology and the Health Care System: A Study of the Diffusion of Equipment-Embodied Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18439.
×
Page 304
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX H: PARTICIPANTS AT OPEN MEETING, APRIL 7, 1977." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 1979. Medical Technology and the Health Care System: A Study of the Diffusion of Equipment-Embodied Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18439.
×
Page 305
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX H: PARTICIPANTS AT OPEN MEETING, APRIL 7, 1977." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 1979. Medical Technology and the Health Care System: A Study of the Diffusion of Equipment-Embodied Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18439.
×
Page 306
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX H: PARTICIPANTS AT OPEN MEETING, APRIL 7, 1977." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 1979. Medical Technology and the Health Care System: A Study of the Diffusion of Equipment-Embodied Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18439.
×
Page 307

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PARTICIPANTS AT OPEN MEETING, APRIL 7, l977 DENNIS J. COTTER, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland W. PALMER DEARING, Blue Cross Association, Washington, D.C. MARIAN BIN, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. HENRY GUTTENTAG, Research Engineer, Dearborn, Michigan EARL H. HERRON, JR., Overlook Hospital, Summit, New Jersey PAUL A. JOLCUVAR, International Instrumentation, Great Neck, New York SAUL M. KILSTEIN, Washington Business Group on Health, Washing- ton, D.C. O. W. LINTON, American College of Radiologists, Chevy Chase, Maryland ROBERT G. McCUNE, National Electrical Manufacturers Association, Washington, D.C. JAMES L. MORRISON, Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, Maryland 20857 KEN NICOLAS, American College of Nuclear Physicians, Washington, D.C. MEREDITH N. SCHECK, National Association of Blue Shield Plans, Washington, D.C. SHAUN SHEEHAN, c/o Daniel J. Endelman, Inc., Washington, D.C. CHARLES H. STEINMETZ, New York Telephone Company, New York, New York BETTY STEELE, American Clinical Laboratories Association, Washington, D.C. WILLIAM G. WELLS, JR., U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. RAY WRITTEN, NASA, Washington, D.C. 20546 303

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Medical technology has unquestionably advanced at a prodigious pace in the past 20 years, changing both the capability of American medicine to detect and treat disease and the public’s expectations of medical care. The continued rapid growth in biomedical and related scientific knowledge is likely to stimulate further significant advances.

Medical Technology and the Health Care System: A Study of the Diffusion of Equipment-Embodied Technology examines the policy and research issues basic to the relationship between new medical technology and the efficiency and effectiveness of the health care system. This report assesses the process by which technology finds its way into the health care system and indentifies and analyzes successes and failures in the process of technological change. Ideally, the more effective and efficient technologies should be introduced quickly; others should not. This report considers the extent to which the ideal results actually do occur and when they don’t, why not.

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