National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: THE EVALUATION OF EQUIPMENT-EMBODIED TECHNOLOGY
Suggested Citation:"GLOSSARY." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 1979. Medical Technology and the Health Care System: A Study of the Diffusion of Equipment-Embodied Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18439.
×
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"GLOSSARY." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 1979. Medical Technology and the Health Care System: A Study of the Diffusion of Equipment-Embodied Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18439.
×
Page 86

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

GLOSSARY Ancillary technology Medical technology used directly to support clinical services, including diagnostic radiology, radiation therapy, clinical laboratory, and other special services. Capital equipment Equipment whose useful life covers an extended period, conventionally assumed to be more than l year. Clinical technology Medical technology used in the provision of direct patient care, including medical and surgical services. Coordinative technology Technology used to facilitate and support the provision of health care services but not directly associ- ated with patient care, including administration, transporta- tion, and communication both within and among health care facilities. Cost-effectiveness The extent to which a medical technology achieves a specified objective at the lowest possible cost. Effectiveness Extent to which a medical technology makes a dif- ference to the objectives of medical care. Equipment-embodied technology Medical technology primarily de- pendent upon capital equipment to perform health care tasks. Medical technology Specialized technology applicable to the practice of medical care, including techniques, drugs, pro- cedures, products, or systems combining these elements. Net social benefit The difference in the value of improved out- comes and the additional costs resulting from the application of a new technology. Practitioner Individual involved in the delivery of health care, including physicians, nurses, and allied health care personnel. Provider Individual or institution that gives medical care, in- cluding institutions and individuals who practice independent of institutions. 85

86 Societal impact Changes in the social and economic structure of communities or nations resulting from the application of a technology. Technical change Change in the methods of producing health care services. Technical validity The extent to which a medical technology does what it purports to do. Technology The body of tools emerging from the interplay of scientific knowledge and practical operation applied to specialized purpose.

Next: REFERENCES »
Medical Technology and the Health Care System: A Study of the Diffusion of Equipment-Embodied Technology Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Medical technology has unquestionably advanced at a prodigious pace in the past 20 years, changing both the capability of American medicine to detect and treat disease and the public’s expectations of medical care. The continued rapid growth in biomedical and related scientific knowledge is likely to stimulate further significant advances.

Medical Technology and the Health Care System: A Study of the Diffusion of Equipment-Embodied Technology examines the policy and research issues basic to the relationship between new medical technology and the efficiency and effectiveness of the health care system. This report assesses the process by which technology finds its way into the health care system and indentifies and analyzes successes and failures in the process of technological change. Ideally, the more effective and efficient technologies should be introduced quickly; others should not. This report considers the extent to which the ideal results actually do occur and when they don’t, why not.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!