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Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary (2014)

Chapter: Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
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Appendix B


Speaker Biographical Sketches

Ronald Acierno, Ph.D., is director of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Clinical Team at the Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center and professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina, where he is director of the Older Adult Crime Victims Clinic. In addition, he is the executive director and founder of the non-profit Veterans on Deck, an organization that uses sailing as a means of community reintegration for Veterans. Dr. Acierno has two related but distinct research foci: epidemiological studies of elder mistreatment and treatment outcome studies with anxiety disorders, focusing on PTSD in military, disaster-affected, and violence-affected populations. His recent research is on using home-based telemedicine for treatment delivery for victims of trauma, disaster, combat or loss, and epidemiology. Thus, Dr. Acierno mixes epidemiological research with treatment outcome research, and keeps close to the clinical world as a clinician-administrator for treatment programs serving both civilian and military traumatized populations.

Scott Beach, Ph.D., is associate director and director of the Survey Research Program at the University Center for Social and Urban Research at the University of Pittsburgh. In addition to his interests in survey methodology, research design, and statistics, Dr. Beach has interests and has published in areas such as aging and caregiver stress, elder abuse, and technology and aging. He has directed and been involved with projects funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation, among many others.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
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Marie Bernard, M.D., is deputy director of the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Working closely with the NIA director, she oversees more than $1 billion in aging research conducted and supported annually by the Institute. As senior geriatrician, she is particularly interested in the translation of NIA research from the basic laboratory to the bedside and community, and in the pipeline of future scientists. She co-chairs the Older Adults Workgroup and the Alzheimer’s and Other Dementias Workgroup for Healthy People 2020. She serves on the NIH Task Force on Women in the Biomedical Workforce, co-chairing the Women of Color Subcommittee. She also serves on the Diversity Task Force and the Bioethics Task Force. She serves as NIA’s liaison to the American Federation for Aging Research, American Geriatrics Society, Department of Veteran Affairs, and Gerontological Society of America. Until 2008, Dr. Bernard was the endowed professor and founding chair of the Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She concomitantly served as associate chief of staff for geriatrics and extended care at the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center. She has been president of the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs, president of the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education, chair of the VA National Research Advisory Committee, and chair of the Clinical Medicine (now Health Sciences) Section of the Gerontological Society of America. Her research interests include nutrition and function in aging populations, with particular emphasis on ethnic minorities. She received her undergraduate training at Bryn Mawr College, where she graduated cum laude with honors in chemistry. She earned her M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. She trained in internal medicine at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, where she served as chief resident. She received additional training through the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Health Services Research Institute, the Geriatric Education Center of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton School Executive Development Program.

Robert Blancato, M.P.A., is president of Matz, Blancato and Associates, a firm founded in 1996, with offices in Washington and New York. It provides a wide array of services for clients ranging from consulting and lobbying to advocacy services and association and coalition management. Preceding this, Mr. Blancato had a career in public service spanning more than 20 years in both Congress and the Executive Branch. He was appointed by President Clinton to be executive director of the 1995 White House Conference on Aging. Ten years later, he was named to the Policy Committee for the 2005 Conference by Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA). Mr. Blancato currently serves as National Coordinator of the 3,000-member nonpartisan Elder Justice Coalition. He also serves as executive director of the National Association of Nutrition and Aging Services Programs. He is the state president

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
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of AARP Virginia. As a volunteer, Mr. Blancato serves on the Board and Executive Committee of the American Society on Aging. He is also on the Board of the National Council on Aging and Generations United. He was appointed in 2008 by Governor Tim Kaine of Virginia to be on the Commonwealth Council on Aging, served as chair from 2009 to 2011, and was reappointed for another 4-year term by Governor Robert McDonnell in 2012. He has been on the adjunct faculty for a number of schools, including the New School for Social Research, George Washington University, University of Maryland, and the Brookdale Center at Hunter College. He has received a number of awards for advocacy and service, including the Arthur Flemming Award and the highest advocacy awards from the Older Women’s League and the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging. In 2012 he was awarded the Riland Medal of Public Service from the New York Institute of Technology. Mr. Blancato holds a B.A. from Georgetown University and an M.P.A. from American University.

Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Ph.D., R.N. (Forum Member), is the Anna D. Wolf Chair and a professor in the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) School of Nursing, with a joint appointment in the Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is also an inaugural Gilman Scholar at JHU. She is national program director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program. Dr. Campbell has been conducting advocacy policy work and research in the area of violence against women since 1980, with 12 major federally funded research grants and more than 220 articles and 7 books. She is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the American Academy of Nursing as well as chair of the Board of Directors of Futures without Violence. She served on the Department of Defense Task Force on Domestic Violence and been a consultant to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and U.S. Agency for International Development. She received the National Friends of the National Institute for Nursing Research (NINR) Research Pathfinder Award, the Sigma Theta Tau International Nurse Researcher Award, and the American Society of Criminology Vollmer Award for advancing justice. Dr. Campbell co-chaired the Steering Committee for the WHO Multicountry Study on Violence Against Women and Women’s Health, has been appointed to three IOM/National Academy of Sciences committees evaluating evidence in various aspects of violence against women, and currently serves on the IOM Board on Global Health. In addition, she co-chairs the IOM Forum on Global Violence Prevention. She is also a member of the Fulbright Specialist Roster and does work in collaboration with shelters, governments, criminal justice agencies, schools of nursing, and health care

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
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settings in countries such as South Africa, Spain, New Zealand, Australia, Haiti, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

E-Shien (Iggy) Chang, M.A., is the research project manager with the Chinese Health, Policy, and Aging Program at Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University, where she is responsible for managing and coordinating community-engaged, participatory research projects pertaining to the health and well-being of older Chinese adults. In this role, Ms. Chang works as a liaison facilitating research collaborations between Rush and Chinese communities in the greater Chicago area. Prior to joining the team, she worked with various community organizations and advocacy groups in Chicago. Ms. Chang received her M.A. in social sciences from the University of Chicago, and her bachelor’s degree in journalism from National Chengchi University, Taiwan.

Marie-Therese Connolly, J.D., is a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and a 2011 MacArthur Foundation fellow. She’s currently completing a book about elder abuse (W.W. Norton), consulting on a Department of Justice (DOJ)/HHS project to create a roadmap for the elder justice field, and involved in an array of projects designed to advance elder justice. Ms. Connolly has played critical roles in advancing law, policy, research, and public awareness relating to elder abuse. She conceived of and was the original architect of the Elder Justice Act, the only federal law to comprehensively address elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation (enacted in 2010 with the Affordable Care Act). As the founding head of DOJ’s Elder Justice and Nursing Home Initiative, she guided theory and strategy in cases against providers that abuse and neglect; launched the first (and still only) ongoing elder justice research grant program through DOJ’s National Institute of Justice; launched the federal interagency Elder Justice Working Group; organized the first forum on the medical forensics of elder abuse and numerous other events; and wrote speeches for high-level government officials on elder justice issues, including for members of the Cabinet and Congress. She has testified before Congress and the Elder Justice Coordinating Council (at its inaugural meeting in 2012), is a frequent public speaker and commentator in the media on elder justice issues, and has published articles on elder justice issues in a variety of academic, policy, and news venues publications. Ms. Connolly is a graduate of Stanford University and Northeastern University Law School.

XinQi Dong, M.D., M.P.H. (Forum Member), is the director of the Chinese Health, Aging and Policy Program, the associate director of the Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, and an associate professor of medicine, nursing, and behavioral sciences at Rush University Medical Center. Dr. Dong has had

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
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longstanding interests in human rights and social justice issues in vulnerable populations, and his research focuses on the epidemiological studies of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation both in the United States and China, with particular emphasis on adverse health outcomes. Dr. Dong has published extensively on this topic and is currently leading an epidemiological study of 3,000 Chinese older adults to quantify longitudinal relationship among culture factors, elder abuse, and trajectories of psychosocial well-being. Dr. Dong serves on the Editorial Board for Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, Journal of Gerontology Medical Sciences, Gerontology, BioMed Research International, Journal of Aging and Health, and Journal of the American Geriatric Society. As an American Political Science Association (APSA) Congressional Policy Fellow/Health and Aging Policy Fellow, he served as a senior policy and research advisor for the Administration on Aging (AoA)/Administration for Community Living (ACL) and a senior policy advisor for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Dr. Dong is also a recipient of the Paul Beeson Award in Aging, National Physician Advocacy Merit Award, the Nobuo Maeda International Aging and Public Health Research Award, and the Maxwell Pollack Award in Productive Aging. Dr. Dong was elected to be a commissioner for the Commission on Law and Aging of the American Bar Association (ABA), and the Board of Directors for the Chinese American Service League, the largest social services organization in the Midwest serving the needs of Chinese populations. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Medicine of Chicago and a member of the IOM Forum on Global Violence Prevention. He received his B.A. in biology and economics from the University of Chicago, his M.D. in the problem-based curriculum at Rush University College of Medicine, and his M.P.H. in epidemiology at University of Illinois at Chicago. He completed his internal medicine residency and geriatric fellowship at Yale University Medical Center.

Carmel Bitondo Dyer, M.D., is a graduate of Baylor College of Medicine, where she completed her Internal Medicine residency and Geriatrics Fellowship. She founded the geriatrics program at the Harris County Hospital District and the Texas Elder Abuse and Mistreatment Institute. Her research and publications have been in elder mistreatment. She was a delegate to the 2005 White House Conference on Aging and has twice provided testimony to the U.S. Senate on behalf of vulnerable elders. She has received national and local recognition for her teaching abilities, research inroads, and dedication to the health care of older persons. Dr. Dyer joined the University of Texas (UT) Health faculty in 2007 and is professor of medicine and director of the Geriatric and Palliative Medicine Division. She is the interim chief of staff for LBJ Hospital and associate dean of Harris County Programs for UT Health. Dr. Dyer holds the Roy M. and Phyllis Gough Huffington

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
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Chair in Gerontology and is executive director of the UT Health Consortium on Aging.

Terry Fulmer, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., is professor and dean of the Bouve College of Health Sciences and professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities at Northeastern University. She received her Bachelor’s degree from Skidmore College, her Master’s and Doctoral degrees from Boston College, and her Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Post-Master’s Certificate from New York University (NYU). She is an elected member of the IOM and currently serves as vice chair of the New York Academy of Medicine. She is an attending nurse and senior nurse in the Munn Center for Nursing Research at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Fulmer is nationally and internationally recognized as a leading expert in geriatrics and is best known for her research on the topic of elder abuse and neglect, which has been funded by the NIA and NINR. She most recently served as the Erline Perkins McGriff Professor of Nursing and founding dean of the New York University College of Nursing. She has held faculty appointments at Boston College, Columbia University, Yale University, and the Harvard Division on Aging. She has served as a visiting professor of nursing at the University of Pennsylvania and Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Fulmer is dedicated to the advancement of intraprofessional health science education and progress in interdisciplinary practice and research. Her clinical appointments have included the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, the Massachusetts General Hospital, and the NYU-Langone Medical Center. She is a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing, Gerontological Society of America, and New York Academy of Medicine. She completed a Brookdale National Fellowship and is a Distinguished Practitioner of the National Academies of Practice.

Kathy Greenlee, J.D. (Forum Member), serves in the dual roles of administrator of the Administration for Community Living and Assistant Secretary for the Administration on Aging. President Obama appointed her to the latter position as Assistant Secretary for Aging at HHS and she was confirmed by the Senate in 2009. ACL is a new federal agency operating within HHS. ACL brings together into a single entity the AoA, the Office on Disability, and the Administration on Developmental Disabilities. ACL is charged with working with states, tribes, community providers, universities, nonprofit organizations, businesses, and families to help seniors and people with disabilities live in their homes and fully participate in their communities. Assistant Secretary Greenlee believes that people with functional support needs should have the opportunity to live independently in a home of their choosing, receiving appropriate services and supports. She is committed to building the capacity of the national aging and disability networks to

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

better serve older persons, caregivers, and individuals with disabilities. Ms. Greenlee served as Secretary of Aging in Kansas, and before that as the Kansas state long-term care ombudsman. She also served as general counsel of the Kansas Insurance Department and as chief of staff and chief of operations for then-Governor Kathleen Sebelius. Ms. Greenlee is a graduate of the University of Kansas with degrees in business administration and law.

Jeffrey E. Hall, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., M.A., is a behavioral scientist at the CDC Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. A medical sociologist by training, he also holds degrees in Epidemiology, General Sociology, and Psychology. His research at the CDC focuses on topics spanning the life course, including infant homicide, youth violence, and elder abuse. He serves as the acting team leader for the Morbidity and Behavioral Surveillance Team in DVP’s Surveillance Branch, Principal Investigator for the CDC School Associated Violent Deaths Study, and co-chair of the DVP Youth Violence Workgroup. He is also chair of the CDC Aging and Health Work Group and is a co-lead of the DVP Elder Abuse Workgroup.

Lori L. Jervis, Ph.D., is an associate professor at the University of Oklahoma Department of Anthropology and a director at the Center for Applied Social Research. A cultural/medical anthropologist as well as gerontologist, her work focuses on the intersection of culture, aging, and health. Dr. Jervis has conducted federally funded research on Native American mental and cognitive health, trauma, and violence. She was principal investigator of a collaborative research project funded by the NIA on elder mistreatment among Native Americans in rural reservations and urban contexts. Dr. Jervis’s research interests include long-term care, with a focus on nursing homes, as well as rural primary care. She has more than two decades of research experience in gerontological anthropology and 16 years devoted specifically to Native Americans. Dr. Jervis is past president of the Association of Anthropology and Gerontology and a current Advisory Board member for the National Indigenous Elder Justice Initiative. Prior to taking a position at the University of Oklahoma, she was on the faculty at the American Indian and Alaska Native Programs in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado, Denver. There she served as a principal ethnographer on a major psychiatric epidemiology study, where issues of trauma related to contemporary reservation life and the larger dynamics of cultural trauma emerged as central issues in intergenerational family life. She has published numerous articles in psychiatric anthropology, gerontology, and neuropsychiatry and, with colleagues, developed a measure to improve the assessment of the mistreatment of older Native Americans.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
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Carole Johnson, M.A., serves on the White House Domestic Policy Council health team working on public health and health care initiatives. She previously served as policy director for the Bureau of Health Professions at the Health Resources and Services Administration in HHS. Prior to joining HHS, she was a lead research scientist and lecturer at the George Washington University’s Center for Health Policy Research. Ms. Johnson previously was a senior policy consultant with Health Policy R&D, a policy research and analysis group. She also served as health staff to Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA) and Rep. Karen Thurman (D-FL) and on the legislative staff of Rep. Bill Hughes (D-NJ). In addition, she was policy director for the Alliance of Community Health Plans, an association of nonprofit health plans; program officer with the Pew Charitable Trusts Health and Human Services Program; and senior government relations manager with the American Heart Association. She holds a master’s degree in government from the University of Virginia.

Alexandre Kalache, Ph.D., M.D., was director of the WHO Department of Ageing and Life Course from 1995 until 2008. Since then, he has been acting as senior policy advisor to the President on Global Ageing at the New York Academy of Medicine and, concomitantly, as a consultant to the municipal and state governments in Rio de Janeiro and the federal government in Brasilia. Under his leadership, WHO launched the Global Movement on Age-Friendly Cities in 2007. He also serves as HelpAge International Global Ambassador on Ageing. This combination of duties indicates the establishment and enhancement of international links, codirecting specific projects based on age-friendly approaches, fostering public–private initiatives on aging, and highlighting the importance of intersectoral action for the full implementation of the Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing. Over recent years, Dr. Kalache has been in the forefront of the process of strengthening human rights of older people at the international level, most importantly toward the adoption of a United Nations (UN) Convention of Rights of Older People. Previously, Dr. Kalache served as founder and head of the Epidemiology of Ageing Unit at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, where he also set up the first European Master’s Degree Course on Health Promotion. From 1978 to 1984, Dr. Kalache was a clinical lecturer at the Department of Community Health, Oxford University. He holds several honorary positions from various universities around the world and is a Board member of several professional international associations in gerontology, public health, and geriatric medicine. Dr. Kalache obtained his master’s degree in social medicine from the University of London, his M.D. from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, and his Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Oxford.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
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Jason Karlawish, M.D., is a professor of medicine, medical ethics, and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. He is board certified in geriatric medicine. Dr. Karlawish is a Senior Fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, a Fellow of the University of Pennsylvania’s Institute on Aging, director of the Penn Neurodegenerative Disease Ethics and Policy Program, and associate director of the Penn Memory Center. He is also director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Center’s Education, Recruitment, and Retention Core. His research focuses on neuroethics and policy. He has investigated issues in dementia drug development, informed consent, quality of life, research and treatment decision making, and voting by persons with dementia.

Mark Lachs, M.D., M.P.H., is director of geriatrics for the New York Presbyterian Health System, co-chief of the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University, and a tenured clinical professor of medicine at the College. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the NYU School of Medicine, he completed a residency in internal medicine at The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and is board certified in internal medicine. In 1988, he became a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at Yale, where he also earned an M.P.H. in chronic disease epidemiology and added qualification in geriatric medicine from the American Board of Internal Medicine. He spent 4 years on the Yale faculty before coming to Cornell to lead the Geriatrics Program. Dr. Lachs’ major area of interest is the disenfranchised elderly, and he has published widely in the areas of elder abuse and neglect, Adult Protective Services, the measurement of functional status, ethics, and the financing of health care. His many honors and awards include an American College of Physicians Teaching and Research Scholarship, an NIA Academic Leadership Award, and a Paul Beeson Physician Faculty Scholarship (the country’s preeminent career development award in aging) from the American Federation for Aging Research through funding from the John A. Hartford Foundation and the Alliance for Aging Research. He is also the recipient of RO1 funding from the NIH to study the impact of crime on the physical and emotional health of older adults. He was asked to serve as an advisor for WHO on elder abuse. Recently, he has been instrumental in advocating for the creation of a dedicated elder abuse center in New York City. In 2010, Penguin Viking published his book Treat Me, Not My Age: A Doctor’s Guide to Getting the Best Care as You or a Loved One Gets Older (www.treatmenotmyage.com).

Gill Livingston, MBChB, FRCPsych, M.D., is a professor in psychiatry of older people in the Mental Health Science Unit in University College of London and consultant old age psychiatrist. She is interested in clinical

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

research in dementia—from epidemiology to pragmatic randomized controlled trials; from diagnosis to end of life. Current funded research includes the START study (STrAtegies for RelaTives) of coping studies for family careers; a systematic review of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of nondrug interventions for agitation in people with dementia; and improving end-of-life care for dementia in care homes. She has been working in research in elder abuse for many years and most of this has been with her colleague Claudia Cooper.

Ronald Long, J.D., is the senior vice president and director of Regulatory Affairs at Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC. In this role, Mr. Long works with key business and support units to foster substantial engagement in and awareness of the changing regulatory and legislative environment. He leads the firm’s efforts to comment on rule changes and helps shape laws impacting the securities industry. Mr. Long joined Wells Fargo Advisors through the merger of Wachovia and Wells Fargo. He joined Wachovia in 2002 and worked in the legal department, leading the team focused on regulatory inquiries. Prior to joining the firm, Mr. Long was district administrator of the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Philadelphia District Office from 1997 to 2002. He joined the Commission staff in 1990 as an attorney in the Division of Enforcement. Mr. Long later assumed the position of counselor to Chair Arthur Levitt. Mr. Long attended Williams College and received his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

Susan Lynch, J.D., M.P.H., LL.M., is a trial attorney at DOJ, where she leads national investigations and civilly prosecutes long-term care facilities for failing to adequately care for their residents. Ms. Lynch sits on the Federal Elder Justice Interagency Working Group, which addresses policy issues such as elder abuse and financial exploitation. Ms. Lynch serves as an adjunct professor of law at the George Washington University Law School, where she has taught since the fall of 2000. Prior to joining DOJ, Ms. Lynch was a litigation associate in private practice in Washington, DC. Ms. Lynch received her B.A. from Dartmouth College, her J.D. from the Indiana University Maurer School of Law, where she served as editor-in-chief of the Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies, and her LL.M. (master’s of law in advocacy) with Distinction from the Georgetown University Law Center. Ms. Lynch received her M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she was inducted into the Delta Omega Public Health Honor Society.

Brigid McCaw, M.D., M.S., M.P.H., FACP (Forum Member), is medical director for the Family Violence Prevention Program at Kaiser Permanente (KP). Her teaching, research, and publications focus on developing

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
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a health systems response to intimate partner violence and the impact of such violence on health status and mental health. She is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians. KP, a large, nonprofit integrated health care organization serving 8.6 million members in nine states and the District of Columbia, has implemented one of the most comprehensive health care responses to domestic violence in the United States. The nationally recognized “systems-model” approach is available across the continuum of care, including outpatient, emergency, and inpatient care; advice and call centers; and chronic care programs. The electronic medical record includes clinician tools to facilitate recognition, referrals, resources, and follow-up for patients experiencing domestic violence and provides data for quality improvement measures. Over the past decade, identification of domestic violence has increased five-fold, with most members identified in the ambulatory rather than the acute care setting. The majority of identified patients receive follow-up mental health services. KP also provides prevention, outreach, and domestic violence resources for its workforce. Violence prevention is an important focus for KP community benefit investments and research studies. The KP program, under the leadership of Dr. McCaw, has received several national awards.

Tara McMullen, M.P.H., Ph.D.(c), is a health analyst at CMS in the Quality Measurement & Health Assessment Group. Ms. McMullen is the health analyst for Nursing Homes and Home Health, working on quality measurement development for the Nursing Home and Home Health Compare sites. Ms. McMullen is a core team member of the CMS initiative, the National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care, the agency-wide initiative of the Adverse Drug Events Task Force, and the CMS Elder Maltreatment Initiative. Moreover, Ms. McMullen is a technical expert for the Pharmacy Quality Alliance’s Technical Expert Panel on pharmacy-related measurement development. Ms. McMullen has published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal for Geriatrics and Gerontology Education, the Journal of Nursing Measurement, and the International Journal of Aging in Society.

Charles P. Mouton, M.D., M.S., is senior vice president for health affairs and dean of the School of Medicine at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee. He is also professor of family and community medicine at Meharry Medical College and professor of medical education and administration at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. As dean, Dr. Mouton serves as chief academic and administrative officer of the school and is responsible for academic programs, student affairs, graduate medical education, curriculum development and management, and financial management of Meharry’s largest academic unit. As senior vice president

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

of health affairs, he is responsible for overseeing, enhancing, and expanding Meharry clinical programs, working closely with key stakeholders of the College and within the community. Dr. Mouton is board certified in family medicine and holds a certificate of added qualifications in geriatrics. Additionally, he is a certified medical director. He received his bachelor’s degree in engineering from Howard University. He also holds an M.S. in epidemiology and an M.S. in clinical epidemiology from the Harvard University School of Public Health. He received his M.D. from the Howard University College of Medicine, completed a Family Practice Residency at Prince George’s Hospital Center in Cheverly, Maryland, and finished a Geriatrics Fellowship at The George Washington Medical Center. Dr. Mouton’s major areas of research interests are elderly mistreatment violence in older women, health promotion and disease prevention in minority elders (especially exercise for the elderly), ethnicity and aging, and quality health care for minorities.

James G. O’Brien, M.D., is professor and the Margaret Dorward Smock Endowed Chair in Geriatrics, as well as chair of the Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine at the University of Louisville in Kentucky. He did his undergraduate and medical training at University College in Dublin, Ireland, Family Medicine Residency at Saginaw Cooperative Hospital, and Fellowship in Geriatrics at Duke University. He is an AoA member and Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and the American Geriatrics Society, received the “Champion for the Aging Award” by Elderserve, Inc., of Louisville, Kentucky, and is an inductee into the Arnold P. Gold Honors Society for Humanism in Medicine. Since 2003, he has served on the Governor’s Task Force on Abuse & Neglect of Elderly for the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Dr. O’Brien was editor of a 1999 issue of the Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect titled Self-Neglect: Challenges for Helping Professionals and was primary author or co-author of three of the articles. He has more than 50 publications in peer-reviewed journals, 2 textbooks, and 15 chapters, and serves on the Editorial Board of Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect. He was inducted as a fellow in The Royal College of Physicians of Ireland in March 2011.

Elizabeth Podnieks, Ed.D., M.S., is a professor emeritus at Ryerson University. She conducted the National Survey of Abuse of the Elderly in Canada in 1991. This landmark survey was the first to be national in scope and marked an important step for understanding the extent of the problem of elder abuse. A pioneer in raising awareness of elder abuse within faith communities and among children and youth, Dr. Podnieks has conducted research and published in these areas. She represented Canada in the WHO/International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (INPEA) Global

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

Response to Elder Abuse and Missing Voices. She has published and presented papers at the national and international levels. She is on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, and has served on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Gerontological Nursing. Dr. Podnieks is founder of the Canadian Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and is a founding member and immediate past president of the INPEA. She is an Honorary Board Member of the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse. Dr. Podnieks is currently working with Dr. Pamela Teaster and Dr. Georgia Anetzberger on the second phase of the global study, The Worldwide Face of Elder Abuse. Other research activities include working with the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario on developing Best Practice Guidelines on Elder Abuse Awareness, Prevention and Intervention. Dr. Podnieks was the founder of World Elder Abuse and Awareness Day (WEAAD) in 2003. In 2012 she developed World Day in Cyberspace. She was awarded the Order of Canada and the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in recognition for work in the field of elder abuse. Her degrees include a bachelor of nursing, master’s in environmental science, and an Ed.D. in sociology.

Kathleen Quinn is the executive director of the National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA), the only national organization representing Adult Protective Services (APS) programs, professionals, and clients. NAPSA, which has more than 600 members, is funded by AoA for the first National APS Resource Center. NAPSA also provides the only annual national conference on elder abuse, abuse of younger adults with disabilities, and APS. Ms. Quinn previously served as policy advisor on senior issues to the Illinois Attorney General, and as the chief of the Bureau of Elder Rights for the Illinois Department on Aging, where she administered the statewide Elder Abuse and Neglect Program and the Long Term Care Ombudsman Program. Earlier she worked with the Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence, where she was responsible for the first statewide training of law enforcement and prosecutors on domestic violence and the then–newly enacted Illinois Domestic Violence Act.

Daniel Reingold, M.S.W., J.D., is president and chief executive officer of The Hebrew Home at Riverdale in New York City. The Hebrew Home is a nonsectarian, not-for-profit geriatric service organization that provides residential health care, senior housing communities, and a full spectrum of home care, rehabilitation, and adult day and overnight respite programs offered by its ElderServe community services division. The Hebrew Home serves more than 7,000 older people in the Bronx, Manhattan, and Westchester County. In 2005, it established The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Center for Elder Abuse Prevention, the nation’s first comprehensive elder abuse shelter.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

Prior to joining The Hebrew Home in 1990, Mr. Reingold was an attorney in private practice representing nonprofit organizations. Mr. Reingold serves on the Boards of Directors of the Continuing Care Leadership Coalition, the Greater New York Hospital Association, and the Association of Jewish Aging Services. Mr. Reingold received a B.A. from Hobart College, an M.S.W. from Columbia University, and a law degree from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law of Yeshiva University.

Charles Sabatino, J.D., is the director of the ABA’s Commission on Law and Aging in Washington, DC, where since 1984 he has been responsible for the ABA Commission’s research, project development, consultation, and education in the areas of health law, long-term care, guardianship and capacity issues, surrogate decision making, legal services delivery for the elderly, and professional ethics. Mr. Sabatino has written and spoken extensively on capacity issues, surrogate decision making, and health care policy. Mr. Sabatino is also a part-time adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center, where he has taught about law and aging since 1987. He is a Fellow and former president of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys. He received his A.B. from Cornell University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and is a member of the Virginia and Washington, DC, bars.

Judith A. Salerno, M.D., M.S., is the former Leonard D. Schaeffer Executive Officer of the IOM of the National Academies. Dr. Salerno was the executive director and chief operating officer of the Institute. She was responsible for managing the IOM’s research and policy programs and guiding the Institute’s operations on a daily basis. Prior to coming to the IOM, Dr. Salerno was Deputy Director of NIA at NIH, HHS. She oversaw more than $1 billion in aging research conducted and supported annually by NIA, including research on Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, frailty and function in late life, and the social, behavioral and demographic aspects of aging. As NIA’s senior geriatrician, Dr. Salerno was vitally interested in improving the health and well-being of older persons, and designed public–private initiatives to address aging stereotypes, novel approaches to support training of new investigators in aging, and award-winning programs to communicate health and research advances to the public. Before joining NIA in 2001, Dr. Salerno directed the continuum of Geriatrics and Extended Care programs across the nation for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Washington, DC. While at VA, she launched widely recognized national initiatives for pain management and improving end-of-life care. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Salerno was Associate Chief of Staff at the VA Medical Center in Washington, DC, where she developed and implemented innovative approaches to geriatric primary

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

care and coordinated area-wide geriatric medicine training. Dr. Salerno also co-founded the Washington, DC, Area Geriatric Education Center Consortium, a collaboration of more than 160 educational and community organizations within the Baltimore-Washington region. The consortium generates educational opportunities for professionals serving the aging. Earlier in her career, Dr. Salerno was a Senior Clinical Investigator at NIA, implementing clinical research protocols for patients with Alzheimer’s disease and hypertension. Dr. Salerno also served on numerous boards and national committees concerned with health care issues ranging from the quality of care in long-term care to the future of the geriatric workforce and currently serves of the boards of several arts organizations. Dr. Salerno earned her M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School in 1985 and a master of science degree in health policy from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1976. She also holds a certificate of added qualifications in geriatric medicine and was associate clinical professor of health care sciences and of medicine at the George Washington University until 2001.

Kimberly Schwartz is a nurse consultant and the program manager for the CMS Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) clinical quality measures, eRx lead and coordinates the alignment of the measures with the other quality reporting programs within CMS. Ms. Schwartz has more than 20 years’ experience in the areas of neonatal and trauma nursing. She has extensive knowledge of clinical quality measures using different data sources and reporting mechanisms. Ms. Schwartz is a registered nurse. She has a B.S.N. from Towson University and is working on her master’s in nursing.

Gregory R. Shaw has a science and health administration background and, until assuming the position of director, International and Corporate Relations of the International Federation on Ageing (IFA) in 2003, held senior management positions within the Australian Commonwealth Department Health and Ageing. Prior to joining the IFA, he managed residential and community aging programs in Western Australia. His long career with the Australian government included management of the Compliance, Complaint and Accountability Section of the Department and responsibility for the regulatory arena associated with quality of care and certification programs in both residential and community care services. His earlier work focused on policy development and program implementation supporting the aged-care needs of rural and remote communities throughout Northern Australia. An advocate of the aging needs of marginalized community groups, he worked with many Aboriginal and ethnic communities, resulting in the establishment of aged-care homes and community services. Since joining the IFA, Mr. Shaw has had responsibility for development of the Building Capacity in Health Care Programs in Africa and worked closely

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

with the South African Human Rights Commission to establish an older person’s forum. In 2010 he worked with the government of Mauritius on the establishment of an Observatory on Ageing. He represents the IFA at the United Nations, works closely with government, and has responsibility for IFA elder abuse initiatives. These initiatives have included the development of educational toolkits targeted to youth; in 2011 he convened an International Forum on Sexual Safety of Older Women, and in 2013 led a high-level meeting to examine issues of financial abuse of Canadian seniors. In 2013, he worked with other civil society organizations on the global thematic consultations on population dynamics, post-2015 development agenda to ensure the needs of older people are recognized.

Paul Smocer is president of The Financial Services Roundtable, and oversees BITS, the technology policy division. Previously, he served as president of Financial Services Technology Consortium (FSTC) and worked to integrate BITS’s and FSTC’s work. Mr. Smocer joined the Roundtable in 2008 as vice president of security, leading BITS’s work in promoting the safety and soundness of financial institutions through best practices and successful strategies for developing secure infrastructures, products, and services. Prior to BITS, Mr. Smocer focused on technology risk management at Bank of New York Mellon (BNY Mellon) and led information security at the former Mellon Financial Corporation. He was previously the chief information security officer and manager of Mellon Financial Corporation’s Technology Assurance Services Division, responsible for information security and technology risk management. Mr. Smocer began his career at Mellon when he joined its Information Technology Audit group, for which he worked until he left to join another Pittsburgh-based institution. Mr. Smocer started up that institution’s information technology audit function until he became chief auditor. He was ultimately responsible for the internal audit, risk management, and corporate compliance functions. He returned to Mellon as a division manager in its Audit and Risk Review Department, where he managed the technology audit group. While at BNY Mellon and at Mellon, he was actively engaged with BITS as a member of its Vendor Management Working Group, chair of the Security Steering Committee, and chair of the former Operational Risk Committee. Mr. Smocer has more than 30 years of experience in technology, security, and control functions. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a degree in business management, concentrating in business systems.

Joy Solomon, J.D., is director and managing attorney of The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Center for Elder Abuse Prevention, the nation’s first emergency shelter for elder abuse victims. Ms. Solomon cofounded the Weinberg Center in 2004. She was previously director of Elder Abuse

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

Services at the Pace Women’s Justice Center, a nonprofit legal advocacy and training center based at Pace University Law School. Prior to joining the Women’s Justice Center, she investigated and prosecuted a variety of crimes, including child abuse, fraud, and elder abuse, as an assistant district attorney in Manhattan, where she served for 8 years. She is a Board member of National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (NCPEA); on the Executive Committee of the Elder Law Section of the New York State Bar Association, where she is chair of the Elder Abuse Committee; and on the Advisory Board of the New York City Elder Abuse Center, of which she was a founder. In 2010, she received The New York State Bar Association award for Excellence in Public Service.

Susan B. Somers, J.D., practices in areas including civil rights, family, and elder issues. She holds a Certificate of Gerontology Studies. She served as assistant deputy attorney general for the state of New York, heading a section of Consumer Frauds and the Elder Protection Unit. She was state director of the Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS) Bureau of Adults Services from 2002 until 2007. She has served as Secretary General of the International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse since 2003. Her focus in human rights is to end abuse, neglect, and violence against vulnerable older persons globally, addressing harmful cultural and traditional practices. Ms. Somers chairs the Elder Abuse Subcommittee of the NGO Committee on Ageing, New York. She participated in the first United Nations Department of Public Information (UN DPI) Briefing on Social Isolation. As part of a National Caregiver training cosponsored by the Nepal Ministry of Women, Children and Social Welfare, and the National Network of Senior Citizens Organization of Nepal, she presented on elder abuse prevention, caretaker stress, and dealing with difficult behaviors of persons with Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia. Ms. Somers earned a J.D. from Albany Law School.

Sidney M. Stahl, Ph.D., served as the chief of the Individual Behavioral Processes Branch in the Division of Behavioral and Social Research at NIA from 1996 until his retirement in 2012. As branch chief, Dr. Stahl was responsible for the group that set NIA’s research agendas on health and behavior, cognitive functioning, emotional well-being, and integrative approaches to the study of social and psychological factors as they impact older persons. The Branch focused primarily on maintaining health and well-being over the lifecourse. During his tenure at NIA, Dr. Stahl played a leading role in promoting diversity in aging research, most notably through his stewardship of the Resource Centers on Minority Aging Research. He was directly responsible for building NIA’s research programs on elder mistreatment, long-term care, caregiving, and behavioral medicine. The

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

Gerontological Society of America (GSA) chose Dr. Stahl as the 2012 recipient of the Donald P. Kent Award. This distinguished honor is given annually to a GSA member who best exemplifies the highest standards for professional leadership in gerontology through teaching, service, and interpretation of gerontology to the larger society. Prior to his career at NIH, Dr. Stahl served as a researcher and professor of medical sociology and social gerontology at Purdue University for more than 20 years. He published extensively on the health of older Americans, social factors in chronic disease, minority aging health, and statistical methods for the measurement of health in aging populations. He served as consultant to WHO in Geneva and Beijing and as a Visiting Scholar at Cambridge University in England. Dr. Stahl is active professionally in GSA, for which he is a Fellow, and the American Sociological Association, for which he was on the Councils of the Section on Aging and the Life Course and the Section on Medical Sociology.

Lori Stiegel, J.D., senior attorney, joined the ABA Commission on Law and Aging staff in 1989. She has developed and directed all of the Commission’s work on elder abuse, including numerous federal grant projects for DOJ and HHS, focusing on legal interventions or laws governing non-legal interventions. She is the author or co-author of numerous books, manuals, curriculums, and articles, including Power of Attorney Abuse: What States Can Do About It—A Comparison of Current State Laws with the New Uniform Power of Attorney Act (2008); Elder Abuse Detection and Intervention: A Collaborative Approach (Springer, 2007); Undue Influence: The Criminal Justice Response (YWCA of Omaha, 2006); and Recommended Guidelines for State Courts Handling Cases Involving Elder Abuse (ABA, 1995). Ms. Stiegel was a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Study Panel on the Risk and Prevalence of Elder Abuse and contributed to the panel’s groundbreaking report Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation in an Aging America (NRC, 2003).

Pamela B. Teaster, M.A., Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Health Behavior and director of Doctoral Studies in the College of Public Health at the University of Kentucky. She directs the Kentucky Justice Center for Elders and Vulnerable Adults and is president of the Kentucky Guardianship Association. She serves on the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Applied Gerontology and the Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect. Dr. Teaster is a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education, a recipient of the Rosalie Wolf Award for Research on Elder Abuse, the Outstanding Affiliate Member Award (Kentucky Guardianship Association), and the Distinguished Educator Award (Kentucky Association for Gerontology). She is the author of more than 100 peer-reviewed articles, reports, books, and book chapters.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

Agnes Tiwari, Ph.D., R.N., is professor and head of the School of Nursing at the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine of the University of Hong Kong (UHK). She is a nurse with extensive experience in clinical practice, administration, education, and research. Prevention of family violence is the focus of her practice, research, teaching, and advocacy work. Recognizing the need for primary prevention of violence in the community, she has collaborated with professionals in primary care and community settings to provide education and support to parents, expectant couples, and elder caregivers for the promotion of harmonious family relationships. She has received grants and awards for her research and service projects, and published extensively on violence prevention and intervention. In recognition of her contributions to research and education on violence prevention, she was selected as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing in 2010, awarded the Women of Influence 2011 by the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong, and received the UHK Research Output Prize in 2011.

Javier Vasquez, LL.M., J.D., has practiced international human rights law with particular emphasis on reproductive rights, the rights of indigenous peoples, disability rights, and the human rights of older persons, among others, for more than 15 years. Currently, he is the human rights law advisor with the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)/WHO. He advises PAHO Member States, civil society, multilateral organizations, and universities and international/regional treaty bodies (e.g., the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, or IACHR) on human rights issues and strategies and on the formulation/review of national laws, policies, programs, services, and plans in a manner consistent with international and regional human rights treaties, international case law, and IACHR jurisprudence. He also drafts intergovernmental resolutions and plans and conducts capacity-building consultations and presentations for mainstreaming human rights in PAHO’s Secretariat and countries. Mr. Vasquez has conducted official visits to 28 countries and participated in the negotiations/formulations of several international/regional human rights treaties and standards, including the current draft Inter-American Convention on the Rights of Older Persons.

Edwin L. Walker, J.D., is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Program Operations with AoA. He serves as the chief career official for the federal agency responsible for advocating on behalf of older Americans. He guides and promotes the development of home- and community-based long-term care programs, policies, and services designed to afford older people and their caregivers the ability to age with dignity and independence and to have a broad array of options for an enhanced quality of life. This includes the promotion and implementation of evidence-based prevention interventions

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

proven effective in avoiding or delaying the onset of chronic disease and illness. He has served as the primary liaison with Congress on legislation related to aging services and programs. Prior to joining AoA, Mr. Walker served as director of the Missouri Division of Aging, responsible for administering a comprehensive set of human service programs for older persons and adults with disabilities. He received a B.A. in mass media arts from Hampton University and a J.D. from the University of Missouri–Columbia School of Law.

Robert B. Wallace, M.D., M.Sc., is the Irene Ensminger Stecher professor of epidemiology and internal medicine at the University of Iowa Colleges of Public Health and Medicine, and director of the University’s Center on Aging. He has been a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, and the National Advisory Council on Aging of NIH. He is an elected Member of the IOM, and past chair of the IOM Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and Board on the Health of Select Populations. He recently received the Walsh McDermott award for distinguished service to the IOM. He is the author or co-author of more than 400 publications and 25 book chapters, and has been the editor of 4 books, including the current edition of Maxcy-Rosenau-Last Public Health and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Wallace’s research interests are in clinical and population epidemiology, and focus on the causes and prevention of disabling conditions among older persons. He has had substantial experience in the conduct of both observational cohort studies of older persons and clinical trials, including preventive interventions related to fracture, cancer, coronary disease, and women’s health. For more than 17 years, he was the site principal investigator for the Women’s Health Initiative, a set of national intervention trials exploring the prevention of breast and colon cancer and coronary disease. He is a co-investigator of the Health and Retirement Study and the National Health and Aging Trends Study, two national cohort studies of the health, social, and economic status of older Americans.

Mark Yaffe, B.Sc., M.D., C.M., MClSc, CCFP, FCFP, is a tenured full professor in the McGill University Department of Family Medicine in Montreal. As a principal or co–principal investigator, Dr. Yaffe has received research grants totaling more than $3.7 million. Research topics have included anticipatory guidance models for the middle-age portion of the lifespan; doctor–patient relationships; interdisciplinary health care; anxiety and depression management; delivery of primary health care; family caregiving; and elder abuse. He served as principal investigator on an interdisciplinary team that developed and validated the Elder Abuse Suspicion Index. He is an elected member of the Board of Directors of the Canadian

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
×

Network for Prevention of Elder Abuse and the director of training for the International Network for Prevention of Elder Abuse. At McGill University, he teaches at the medical undergraduate, postgraduate, continuing professional education/faculty development levels. He also conducts master’s and Ph.D.-level thesis supervision. He has also served as family medicine postgraduate residency program director. His accomplishments in education have been recognized by early induction into the McGill University Faculty of Medicine Honor List for Educational Excellence. In 2007 he was the Inaugural Recipient of the Prize of Excellence for the Advancement of Family Medicine Education of the Quebec College of Family Physicians and the College of Family Physicians of Canada. At St. Mary’s Hospital Center, he has been chief of the Department of Family Medicine and director of the teaching Family Medicine Center. Dr. Yaffe is an honorary fellow of the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

Elsie Yan, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Social Work and Social Administration, UHK°. Her research interests include domestic violence, mainly focusing on factors and impacts associated with elder abuse and intimate partner violence in older couples. She is also conducting research on dementia care and elder sexuality. Her publications appeared in International Psychogeriatrics, International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Journal of Family Violence, and Journal of Interpersonal Violence, and others.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18518.
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Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary Get This Book
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Elder Abuse and Its Prevention is the summary of a workshop convened in April 2013 by the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Global Violence Prevention. Using an ecological framework, this workshop explored the burden of elder abuse around the world, focusing on its impacts on individuals, families, communities, and societies. Additionally, the workshop addressed occurrences and co-occurrences of different types of abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional, and financial, as well as neglect. The ultimate objective was to illuminate promising global and multisectoral evidence-based approaches to the prevention of elder maltreatment. While the workshop covered scope and prevalence and unique characteristics of abuse, the intention was to move beyond what is known about elder abuse to foster discussions about how to improve prevention, intervention, and mitigation of the victims' needs, particularly through collaborative efforts. The workshop discussions included innovative intervention models and opportunities for prevention across sectors and settings.

Violence and related forms of abuse against elders is a global public health and human rights problem with far-reaching consequences, resulting in increased death, disability, and exploitation with collateral effects on well-being. Data suggest that at least 10 percent of elders in the United States are victims of elder maltreatment every year. In low- and middle-income countries, where the burden of violence is the greatest, the figure is likely even higher. In addition, elders experiencing risk factors such as diminishing cognitive function, caregiver dependence, and social isolation are more vulnerable to maltreatment and underreporting. As the world population of adults aged 65 and older continues to grow, the implications of elder maltreatment for health care, social welfare, justice, and financial systems are great. However, despite the magnitude of global elder maltreatment, it has been an underappreciated public health problem. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention discusses the prevalence and characteristics of elder abuse around the world, risk factors for abuse and potential adverse health outcomes, and contextually specific factors, such as culture and the role of the community.

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