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Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and Their Families: An Assessment of Programs (2014)

Chapter: Appendix B: INFORMATION-GATHERING MEETING AGENDA

« Previous: Appendix A: SUMMARY FROM *RETURNING HOME FROM IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN: ASSESSMENT OF READJUSTMENT NEEDS OF SERVICE MEMBERS AND THEIR FAMILIES*
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: INFORMATION-GATHERING MEETING AGENDA." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and Their Families: An Assessment of Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18597.
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B


INFORMATION-GATHERING MEETING AGENDA

COMMITTEE ON THE ASSESSMENT OF RESILIENCY AND PREVENTION PROGRAMS FOR MENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH IN SERVICE MEMBERS AND THEIR FAMILIES

Second Meeting, August 5-6, 2013
Members’ Room
NAS Building
Washington, DC 20001

AGENDA

Monday, August 5

OPEN SESSION

 

Topic

Speaker

9:30–10:15

Resilience

William P. Nash, M.D. Captain, Medical Corps, United States Navy (Retired) Former Director of Marine Corps Combat and Operational Stress Control Programs

10:15–11:00

Military Families

Theresa T. Buchanan, BSN, JD Youth Initiatives Director, National Military Family Association

11:00–11:15

Break

 

11:15–12:00

Suicide

Richard McKeon, Ph.D Chief, Suicide Prevention Branch, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: INFORMATION-GATHERING MEETING AGENDA." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and Their Families: An Assessment of Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18597.
×

12:00–1:00

Lunch

 

1:00–1:45

Suicide Prevention: Advances, Opportunities, and Needed Directions

Matthew K. Nock, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology, Harvard University

1:45–2:30

PTSD

LTC Dennis McGurk, Ph.D. Deputy Director, Military Operational Medicine Research Program, Medical Research & Materiel Command, US Army

2:30–3:15

Families/Children

William R. Beardslee, M.D. Director, Baer Prevention Initiatives, Boston Children’s Hospital, Gardner/Monks Professor of Child Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

3:15–3:30

Break

 

3:30–4:15

Substance Use Disorders

Eve E. Reider, Ph.D. Health Scientist Administrator, Prevention Research Branch Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health

4:15–5:00

Families/Tragedy Assistance

Lynda C. Davis, Ph.D. Advisory Board Member, Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS)

Tuesday, August 6

OPEN SESSION

 

Topic

Speaker

9:00–9:45

Impact of Military Culture Discouraging Substance Use and Abuse Among Combat-Deployed Active-Duty Service Members

Diana Jeffery, Ph.D. Senior Health Care Analyst, Defense Health Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation (DHCAPE), Office of the Chief Financial Officer,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: INFORMATION-GATHERING MEETING AGENDA." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and Their Families: An Assessment of Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18597.
×

TRICARE Management Activity, Assistant Secretary of Defense - Health Affairs, Department of Defense

9:45–10:30

Interpersonal Violence

Glenna Tinney, M.S.W., ACSW, DCSW, Captain, U.S. Navy (Ret.) Military Advocacy Program Coordinator, Battered Women’s Justice Project

10:30–11:15

Substance Use Disorders

Peter J. Delany, Ph.D., LCSW-C, RADM U.S. Public Health Service, Director, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

11:15–12:00

Comprehensive Soldier Fitness

LTC Sharon McBride, Ph.D. Executive Officer, Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness

Coreen M. Harada, Ed.D Warrior Transition Unit and Research/Evaluation Lead, Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness Training Centers

Major Paul B. Lester, Ph.D. Director, Research Facilitation Team, Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: INFORMATION-GATHERING MEETING AGENDA." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and Their Families: An Assessment of Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18597.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: INFORMATION-GATHERING MEETING AGENDA." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and Their Families: An Assessment of Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18597.
×
Page 183
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: INFORMATION-GATHERING MEETING AGENDA." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and Their Families: An Assessment of Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18597.
×
Page 184
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: INFORMATION-GATHERING MEETING AGENDA." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and Their Families: An Assessment of Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18597.
×
Page 185
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: INFORMATION-GATHERING MEETING AGENDA." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and Their Families: An Assessment of Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18597.
×
Page 186
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Being deployed to a war zone can result in numerous adverse psychological health conditions. It is well documented in the literature that there are high rates of psychological disorders among military personnel serving in Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq as well as among the service members' families. For service members' families, the degree of hardship and negative consequences rises with the amount of the service members' exposure to traumatic or life-altering experiences. Adult and child members of the families of service members who experience wartime deployments have been found to be at increased risk for symptoms of psychological disorders and to be more likely to use mental health services.

In an effort to provide early recognition and early intervention that meet the psychological health needs of service members and their families, DOD currently screens for many of these conditions at numerous points during the military life cycle, and it is implementing structural interventions that support the improved integration of military line personnel, non-medical caregivers, and clinicians, such as RESPECT-Mil (Re-engineering Systems of Primary Care Treatment in the Military), embedded mental health providers, and the Patient-Centered Medical Home.

Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and Their Families evaluates risk and protective factors in military and family populations and suggests that prevention strategies are needed at multiple levels - individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and societal - in order to address the influence that these factors have on psychological health. This report reviews and critiques reintegration programs and prevention strategies for PTSD, depression, recovery support, and prevention of substance abuse, suicide, and interpersonal violence.

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