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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2014. Spurring Innovation in Food and Agriculture: A Review of the USDA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18652.
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B

Presentations to the Committee

FEBRUARY 27, 2013

Motivation for the Study and U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Study Objectives

Sonny Ramaswamy, Director, USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Programs at USDA Agricultural Research Service and Their Complementarity with AFRI

Ed Knipling, Administrator, USDA Agricultural Research Service

Programs at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Their Complementarity with AFRI

Sharlene Weatherwax, DOE Associate Director of Science for Biological and Environmental Research

The Association of Public Land-Grant Universities’ (APLU) Expectation/View of AFRI

Ian Maw, APLU Vice President of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources

The Federation of Animal Science Societies’ (FASS) Expectation/View of AFRI

Anthony Pescatore, FASS Board President

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2014. Spurring Innovation in Food and Agriculture: A Review of the USDA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18652.
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American Society of Agronomy (ASA)–Crop Science Society of America (CSSA)–Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)’s Expectation/View of AFRI

Jeffrey Volenec, CSSA President

APRIL 1, 2013

Keynote Address: The Role of Competitive Grants Research at USDA

The Honorable Catherine Woteki, Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Extension, U.S. Department of Agriculture

The 2004 Report: Assessment and Recommendations for the Creation of NIFA and a Competitive Grants Program

William H. Danforth II, Chancellor Emeritus, Washington University in St. Louis

The AFRI Grant-Making and Grant-Management Process

Mark Mirando, National Program Leader for Animal Nutrition, Growth, and Reproduction, NIFA

Ann Lichens-Park, National Program Leader for Microbial Genomics, NIFA

Single Institution AFRI Grant Recipient

Conner Bailey, Professor of Rural Sociology, Auburn University

Multi-Institution CAP Grant Recipient

James Womack, W.P. Luse Endowed & Distinguished Professor in Veterinary Pathobiology, Texas A&M University

Single Investigator AFRI Grant Recipient

Li-Jun Ma, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Massachusetts

APRIL 2, 2013

Multi-Institution CAP Grant Recipient

Lee-Ann Jaykus, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor in Food Science, North Carolina State University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2014. Spurring Innovation in Food and Agriculture: A Review of the USDA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18652.
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JUNE 3, 2013

The Role and Relevance of the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) to Agricultural Preparedness

Barbara Schaal, Professor, Mary-Dell Chilton Distinguished Professor, Washington University; Co-chair, Report to the President on Agricultural Preparedness and the Agriculture Research Enterprise

CREATE-21 and Its Relation to NIFA and AFRI in the 2008 Farm Bill

Jeffrey Armstrong, President, California Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo; and Co-chair of CREATE-21

A Vision for AFRI

Roger Beachy, Professor, Washington University; former Director, National Institute of Food and Agriculture

The Role of AFRI in Agricultural Economics and in Rural and Community Development

Scott Loveridge, Professor of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Michigan State University; Director of the North Central Regional Center for Rural Development

The American Society of Plant Biologists’ (ASPB) Expectations and Views of AFRI

Peggy Lemaux, President, ASPB; Cooperative Extension Specialist, University of California, Berkeley

The Institute of Food Technologists’ (IFT) Expectations and Views of AFRI

Will Fisher, Vice President of Science and Policy Initiatives, IFT

Views and Expectations of AFRI from the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP)

Kei Koizumi, Assistant Director, Federal Research and Development, OSTP

JUNE 4, 2013

Views and Expectations of AFRI from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)

Noah Engelberg, Program Examiner, OMB

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2014. Spurring Innovation in Food and Agriculture: A Review of the USDA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18652.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2014. Spurring Innovation in Food and Agriculture: A Review of the USDA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18652.
×
Page 171
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2014. Spurring Innovation in Food and Agriculture: A Review of the USDA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18652.
×
Page 172
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2014. Spurring Innovation in Food and Agriculture: A Review of the USDA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18652.
×
Page 173
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2014. Spurring Innovation in Food and Agriculture: A Review of the USDA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18652.
×
Page 174
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The United States embarked on bold polices to enhance its food and agricultural system during the last half of the 19th century, investing first in the education of people and soon thereafter in research and discovery programs aimed at acquiring new knowledge needed to address the complex challenges of feeding a growing and hungry nation. Those policies, sustained over 125 years, have produced the most productive and efficient agricultural and food system in history.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is the primary agency responsible for supporting innovations and advances in food and agriculture. USDA funds are allocated to support research through several mechanisms, including the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI). In 2008, Congress replaced USDA's National Research Initiative with AFRI, creating USDA's flagship competitive research grants program, and the 2008 Food, Conservation, and Energy Act, known as the Farm Bill, outlined the structure of the new program. Spurring Innovation in Food and Agriculture assesses the effectiveness of AFRI in meeting the goals laid out by Congress and its success in advancing innovations and competitiveness in the U.S. food and agriculture system.

Spurring Innovation in Food and Agriculture evaluates the value, relevance, quality, fairness, and flexibility of AFRI. This report also considers funding policies and mechanisms and identifies measures of the effectiveness and efficiency of AFRI's operation. The study examines AFRI's role in advancing science in relation to other research and grant programs inside of USDA as well as how complementary it is to other federal research and development programs. The findings and conclusions of this report will help AFRI improve its functions and effectiveness in meeting its goals and outcomes.

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