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Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary (2014)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
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C

Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members

Dawn Alley, Ph.D., is Senior Policy Advisor, Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, where her research examines two important determinants of disability at older ages: socioeconomic status and obesity. Her work combines an understanding of biological mechanisms of frailty with a demographic approach. In recent projects, Dr. Alley has examined the association between financial strain and health in older adults, the changing association between obesity and disability over time, and the effects of muscle weakness (sarcopenia) on disability. Her work has been published in a range of journals, including Journal of the American Medical Association, American Journal of Public Health, The Gerontologist, Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, and American Journal of Epidemiology. Dr. Alley holds a Ph.D. in Gerontology from the University of Southern California and received post-doctoral training in population health from the University of Pennsylvania as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar. From 2011 to 2012, she served as a Health and Aging Policy Fellow in the U.S. Office of the Surgeon General.

Ned Codd, M.S., is the Director of Project-Oriented Planning for the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT). Mr. Codd oversees the regional planning, corridor planning, and private development review groups in MassDOT’s planning unit, with a focus on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×

project development and programming, multi-modal transportation planning, transportation impacts on public health and climate change, travel demand management, and smart growth development. Prior to joining MassDOT, Mr. Codd worked as a project manager for Rizzo Associates, an engineering design/consulting firm in Framingham, Massachussetts, and before that he worked as a transportation planner for the City of Boston Transportation Department. His work in these positions focused on a broad range of urban multi-modal transportation planning issues. Mr. Codd has a bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering and Architecture from Princeton University, a master’s degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin, and master’s of business administration from Northeastern University. Mr. Codd is a registered Professional Engineer in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Freddy L. Collier, Jr., is the Assistant Director of the Cleveland City Planning Commission. He holds a B.A. in Urban Studies with an emphasis in urban planning and a master’s degree in Public Administration. Prior to his current role, Mr. Collier served as Chief City Planner and project manager of the Connecting Cleveland 2020 Citywide Plan. Other initiatives that Mr. Collier has been engaged in include Re-imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland, the Northeast Ohio Sustainable Communities Consortium, and the Cuyahoga County Place Matters team, which seeks to improve the health of communities by working with policy makers and organizations to focus on the social determinants of health to create viable sustainable communities.

Rochelle Davis brings broad experience as a leader in children’s wellness and environmental health to her role as President and CEO of the Healthy Schools Campaign (HSC), a national not-for-profit organization she founded in 2002. HSC advocates for national, state and local policies and programs that make schools healthy places to learn and work. Ms. Davis has led change on numerous public policy issues affecting children’s health, from environmental toxins to nutrition and fitness. Her role at HSC includes engaging diverse coalitions of stakeholders to promote healthy eating, physical activity, and environmental health in schools. Ms. Davis has been instrumental in the development of national healthy school food advocacy initiatives such as the Cooking up Change healthy cooking contest and school environmental health resources such as HSC’s Quick & Easy Guide to Green Cleaning in Schools. She also served as the Principal Investigator for HSC’s National Institutes of Health funded Partnership to Reduce Disparities in Asthma and Obesity in Latino Schools. Ms. Davis is a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Committee for the Protection of Children’s Health and a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×

founding member of the Green Cleaning Network. She served as a judge for Health Magazine’s Healthiest Schools Contest and American School and University’s Green Clean Award. She is co-author of the cookbook Fresh Choices, and was the recipient of the Chicago Tribune’s 2007 Good Eating Award.

Kathleen Dickhut, M.S., is Deputy Commissioner of the Sustainability and Open Space Division of the City of Chicago Department of Housing and Economic Development. The division implements the CitySpace and Chicago River plans, led the development, and coordinates implementation of the Calumet plans, Logan Square Open Space Plan, Chicago Eat Local Live Healthy, A Recipe for Healthy Places and Adding Green to Urban Design. Plans nearing completion are a citywide manufacturing plan and a land-use plan for five city neighborhoods that has undergone a large population loss. To implement the plans the Division acquires and funds new parks, community gardens, and urban agriculture sites and develops policies and programs for green infrastructure, manufacturing, and local food systems. Ms. Dickhut has a master’s of science in Landscape Architecture from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a bachelor’s degree in psychology and anthropology.

CAPT Kimberly Elenberg, R.N., DNP, works with the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Office of the Chief Medical Officer as the Deputy Director of Population Health and Medical Management. Previously, she was Director of Training and Manager of Medical Readiness in the Office of Force Readiness and Deployment, Office of the Surgeon General. She was responsible for teaching the multiple disciplines within the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps how to strengthen and build health infrastructure following manmade or natural disasters. CAPT Elenberg also has served as Director for Biosurveillance and Emergency response at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, where she orchestrated the design and development of nationwide electronic food safety and security systems in addition to assisting with the design of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s National Biosurveillance Information System. She also served on the Homeland Security Council National Security Subcommittee to evaluate and make recommendations to the president on matters related to medical and public health information sharing. CAPT Elenberg earned a bachelor’s degree in nursing at Temple University, Philadelphia, on a 4-year ROTC scholarship and a master’s degree in informatics from the University of Maryland, and graduated summa cum laude with a doctorate in nursing practice from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. During her career, she has responded to many disasters. For her leadership during deployments

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×

in 2007 and 2009, CAPT Elenberg received the Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal. In 2008, she served aboard the USS Boxer in Central America as part of Operation Continuing Promise.

Florence Fulk, M.S., has worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Office of Research and Development (ORD) since 1990 and has gained extensive experience with the application of experimental design and statistical analysis of data across numerous scientific disciplines, including ecology, biology, microbiology, virology, engineering, chemistry, and quality assurance. Due to her activities in support of the EPA’s use of whole effluent toxicity testing in regulatory decisions, she received the designation of national expert in environmental statistics and their application to environmental decision making from ORD in 2002. Currently, Ms. Fulk is Chief of the Molecular Ecology Research Branch within ORD’s National Exposure Research Laboratory in Cincinnati, Ohio. Her current areas of interest are development of new DNA-based methods to support exposure assessment and the bioassessment of surface waters; and improvement of the linkage of public health to ecosystem health. Ms. Fulk also serves as a task lead for EPA’s Sustainability and Healthy Communities Research Program where she promotes the use of Health Impact Assessment by regional, state and community decision makers as an approach to enhance public health. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Epidemiology at the University of Cincinnati.

Jennifer Ho is Senior Advisor for Housing and Services at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. In this role, Ms. Ho manages the Department’s work to connect housing with health and social services. From February 2010 to February 2013, Ms. Ho was a Deputy Director at the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH). She shepherded the development of the Opening Doors, the nation’s first-ever comprehensive federal plan to prevent and end homelessness. She facilitated development of the USICH youth framework, and served as point person on issues related to families and chronic homelessness. She has helped communities across the country translate the opportunities inherent in the Affordable Care Act to the work of ending homelessness. From 1999 to 2010, Ms. Ho was the first Executive Director of a nonprofit organization called Hearth Connection, which managed a nationally recognized demonstration project on long-term homelessness for single adults and families in Minnesota. She was Vice President of New Product Development at United Health Group’s Ovations Division and Director of Government Programs at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×

George J. Isham, M.D., M.S., is Senior Advisor, HealthPartners, Inc., and Senior Policy Fellow, HealthPartners Research Foundation. As Senior Advisor, Dr. Isham is responsible for working with the board of directors and the senior management team on health and quality of care improvement for patients, members, and the community. He is also Senior Fellow, HealthPartners Research Foundation and facilitates forward progress at the intersection of population health research and public policy. Dr. Isham is active nationally and currently co-chairs the National Quality Forum convened Measurement Application Partnership, chairs the National Committee for Quality Assurance’s (NCQA’s) clinical program committee and a is member of NCQA’s committee on performance measurement. Dr. Isham is chair of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Roundtable on Health Literacy and has chaired three studies in addition to serving on a number of IOM studies related to health and quality of care. In 2003, Dr. Isham was appointed as a lifetime National Associate of the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of his contributions to the work of the IOM. He is a former member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Task Force on Community Preventive Services and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and currently serves on the advisory committee to the director of CDC. His practice experience as a general internist was with the U.S. Navy, at the Freeport Clinic in Freeport, Illinois, and as a clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics in Madison, Wisconsin.

David A. Kindig, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus of Population Health Sciences, Emeritus Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences at the School of Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Kindig received a B.A. from Carleton College in 1962 and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago School of Medicine in 1968. He completed residency training in Social Pediatrics at Montefiore Hospital in 1971. Dr. Kindig served as Professor of Preventive Medicine/Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin from 1980 to 2003, where he developed a unique distance education graduate degree in medical management. He was Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, from 1980 to 1985, Director of Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center (1976-1980), Deputy Director of the Bureau of Health Manpower, U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare (1974-1976), and the First Medical Director of the National Health Services Corps (1971-1973). He was National President of the Student American Medical Association in 1967-1968. He served as Chair of the federal Council of Graduate Medical Education (1995-1997), President of the Association for Health Services Research (1997-1998), a ProPAC Commissioner from 1991-1994 and as

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×

Senior Advisor to Donna Shalala, Secretary of Health and Human Services from 1993-1995. In 1996 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences. He received the Distinguished Service Award, University of Chicago School of Medicine 2003. He chaired the Institute of Medicine Committee on Health Literacy in 2002-2004, chaired Wisconsin Governor Doyle’s Healthy Wisconsin Task Force in 2006, and received the 2007 Wisconsin Public Health Association’s Distinguished Service to Public Health Award.

James Knickman, Ph.D., is President and Chief Executive Officer of the New York State Health Foundation (NYSHealth), a private foundation dedicated to improving the health of all New Yorkers. Under Dr. Knickman’s leadership, NYSHealth has invested more than $85 million since 2006 in initiatives to improve health care and the public health system in New York State. Today, the Foundation focuses its efforts in three priority areas: reducing the number of New Yorkers without health insurance coverage; improving prevention and management of diabetes; and advance primary care to develop innovative approaches and meet growing demand. Immediately prior to joining the Foundation, Dr. Knickman was the Vice President of Research and Evaluation at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in Princeton, New Jersey. Between 1976 and 1992, he served on the faculty of New York University’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service; earlier, he worked at the New York City Office of Management and Budget. Dr. Knickman serves as a board member of the Center for Effective Philanthropy in Cambridge, Massachusetts; the National Council on Aging in Washington, DC; and Philanthropy New York, in New York City. He is a past chair of the New Jersey Department of Health’s Cardiac Health Advisory Council, a past board member of AcademyHealth in Washington, DC, a past board member of the New York Catholic Health Care System, and a past board member of the Robert Wood Johnson Health System in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Dr. Knickman received a bachelor of arts degree in sociology and psychology from Fordham University and his Ph.D. in public policy analysis from the University of Pennsylvania.

Phyllis W. Meadows, Ph.D., R.N., M.S.N., is Senior Fellow, Health Program, The Kresge Foundation. At The Kresge Foundation, Dr. Meadows engages in all levels of grant-making activity. Since joining Kresge in 2009, she has advised the health team on the development of its overall strategic direction and provided leadership in the design and implementation of grantmaking initiatives and projects. Dr. Meadows’ 30-year career spans the nursing, public health, academic, and philanthropic sectors. She is associate dean for practice at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health and has lectured at Wayne State University’s School of Nursing,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×

Oakland University’s School of Nursing, and Marygrove College. From 2004 to 2009, Dr. Meadows served as deputy director, director, and public health officer at the Detroit Department of Health and Wellness Promotion. In the early 1990s, she traveled abroad as a Kellogg International Leadership Fellow and subsequently joined the W.K. Kellogg Foundation as a program director. She also served as director of nursing for The Medical Team-Michigan.

Connie Mitchell, M.D., M.P.H., has a career that has spanned the spectrum from the highest acuity intervention to health policy for primary prevention. After completing her residency training in Emergency Medicine in Chicago, Illinois, she was a fellow in International Health and consultant to the U.S. Agency for International Development to help establish an emergency medical system system in Costa Rica. From 1989-2005, Dr. Mitchell was a faculty member in the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine with a joint appointment in Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine and supervised training of residents and students in a Level I trauma center. During this time period her academic focus was on the precursors to intentional injury and more effective strategies for prevention and intervention. She is the Editor-in-Chief of the textbook Intimate Partner Violence: A Health-Based Perspective published by Oxford University Press and continues to serve on national advisory councils to prevent violence and abuse. She returned to school to add a master’s degree in Public Health with an emphasis on health policy and then transitioned to the California Department of Public Health to become the Branch Chief for Policy in Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health and now the Chief of Policy in California’s new Office of Health Equity. Dr. Mitchell oversees the Health in All Policies Task Force, whose primary goal is to promote health equity by addressing the social determinants of health using a multi-sectoral approach. She credits her strengths in strategic planning and relationship building for practice and policy achievements she has helped to implement for victims of family violence, maternal and infant care, and now in regard to the challenge of ending health disparities.

Beth Osborne, J.D., joined the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Transportation Policy in 2009. She has worked on the development of the surface transportation reauthorization, and currently is focusing on the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery Discretionary Grant program, the Secretary’s livability initiative as well as safety and environment issues. Before joining DOT, Ms. Osborne worked for Senator Tom Carper (D-DE) as his legislative assistant for transportation, trade and labor policy, including work on SAFETEA-LU and the Energy Independence and Security Act

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×

of 2007. Previously, Ms. Osborne worked as the policy director for Smart Growth America and as legislative director for environmental policy at the Southern Governors’ Association. She began her career in Washington, DC, in the House of Representatives working as a legislative assistant for Rep. Ron Klink (PA-04) and as legislative director for Rep. Brian Baird (WA-03). Ms. Osborne grew up in New Orleans and graduated with a B.A. and J.D. from Louisiana State University.

Linda Rudolph, M.D., M.P.H., is the co-director of the Climate Change and Public Health Project in Public Health Institute’s (PHI’s) Center for Climate Change and Public Health. She is also the principal investigator on a PHI project to advance the integration of Health in All Policies in local jurisdictions around California. Previously, Dr. Rudolph served as the deputy director of the California Department of Public Health’s (CDPH’s) Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Public Health and the health officer and public health director for the City of Berkeley, California. While at CDPH, Dr. Rudolph chaired the Strategic Growth Council Health in All Policies Task Force and the California Climate Action Team Public Health Work Group. Dr. Rudolph has also been the chief medical officer for Medi-Cal Managed Care, medical director for the California Division of Workers’ Compensation, executive medical director for the Industrial Medical Council, staff physician in the CDPH Occupational Health program, and a physician for the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers’ International Union. Dr. Rudolph received her doctorate in medicine and clinical training in pediatrics and emergency medicine from the University of California, San Francisco. She holds a master’s in public health from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Rudolph is board certified in occupational medicine.

Pamela Russo, M.D., M.P.H., is a member of the Public Health team at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The team is committed to improving the health of communities and strengthening the public health system’s ability to prevent illness, injury, and premature death. Public health provides protection from threats such as bioterrorism and emerging infectious diseases, and also seeks to provide equitable opportunities for people to live long, healthy lives. Achieving these goals requires partnerships across different sectors of the community, and collaborative actions that address the root causes of disease and injury. The Public Health team views health as the result of interactions among social, environmental, behavioral, health care, and biological/genetic factors. Dr. Russo’s programmatic areas of focus on the Public Health team include health impact assessment; quality improvement in public health; accreditation of public health agencies at the local, state, and tribal level; and leader-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×

ship development in public health. In addition to being a member of the Public Health team, Dr. Russo serves as the senior program officer for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars, a national Foundation program that enables outstanding individuals who have completed doctoral training to engage in an intensive 2-year program in population health at one of six nationally prominent universities. This innovative program seeks to produce leaders in population health who will work across disciplines and across sectors to change the questions asked, the methods employed to analyze problems, and the range of solutions offered to improve population health and reduce disparities in health. Dr. Russo came to the Foundation in November 2000 from the Cornell University Medical Center in New York City, where she was an associate professor of medicine, director of the clinical outcomes section, and program co-director for the master’s program and fellowship in clinical epidemiology and health services research. Her education includes a B.S. from Harvard College, M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco, and an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health. She did a residency in primary care general internal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, followed by a fellowship in clinical epidemiology and rheumatology at Cornell University Medical Center and the Hospital for Special Surgery.

Loel Solomon, Ph.D., M.P.P., joined Kaiser Permanente’s Community Benefit Program in 2003 and currently serves as Vice President for Community Health. In that position, Dr. Solomon works with other health plan and medical group leaders to establish the strategic direction for Kaiser Permanente’s multifaceted approach to prevention and community health and develops national partnerships to advance those ends. He was a co-founder of the Healthy Eating/Active Living Convergence Partnership, a collaborative of national funders working to advance policy and environmental approaches to community health and currently serves on the Convergence Partnership’s steering committee. Dr. Solomon also convenes Kaiser Permanente’s Community Benefit leaders and oversees the program’s evaluation and community health needs assessment activities. Prior to coming to Kaiser Permanente, Dr. Solomon served as Deputy Director of the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development for Healthcare Quality and Analysis where he oversaw the state’s hospital outcomes reporting program, analyses of racial and ethnic health disparities and dissemination of health care data to researchers and members of the public. He served as a senior manager at the Lewin Group in Washington, DC, and as a member of Senator Edward Kennedy’s health staff. Dr. Solomon received his Ph.D. in health policy from Harvard Uni-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×

versity and a master of public policy degree at University of California, Berkeley.

Aaron Wernham, M.D., M.S., is the director of the Health Impact Project, a collaboration of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and The Pew Charitable Trusts, established to promote and support the use of health impact assessment (HIA) in the United States. Dr. Wernham was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on HIA, led multiple HIAs and HIA trainings, and collaborated with and advised numerous state and federal agencies on HIA. Prior to joining Pew, Dr. Wernham served as a senior policy analyst with the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium where he headed a joint state-tribal-federal working group that developed HIA guidance for federal and state environmental regulatory and permitting efforts. Dr. Wernham received his medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco, and his master’s degree in health and medical sciences from the University of California, Berkeley. He is board certified in family medicine, and served as clinical faculty in a University of California, Davis, family practice residency program.

David R. Williams, Ph.D., M.P.H., is the Florence and Laura Norman Professor of Public Health at the Harvard School of Public Health, Professor of African and African American Studies and of Sociology at Harvard University. His first 6 years as a faculty member were at Yale University where he held appointments in both Sociology and Public Health. The next 14 years were at the University of Michigan where he was the Harold Cruse Collegiate Professor of Sociology, a Senior Research Scientist at the Institute of Social Research and a Professor of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health. Dr. Williams holds a master’s degree in public health from Loma Linda University and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Michigan. He is internationally recognized as a leading social scientist focused on social influences on health. His research has enhanced understanding of the complex ways in which race, stress, racial discrimination, socioeconomic status, and religious involvement can affect physical and mental health. The Everyday Discrimination scale that he developed is currently one of the most widely used measures to assess perceived discrimination in health studies. He is the author of more than 325 scholarly papers in scientific journals and edited collections and his research has appeared in leading journals in sociology, psychology, medicine, public health, and epidemiology. He has served on the editorial board of 12 scientific journals and as a reviewer for more than 60 journals. According to Information Sciences Institute (ISI) Essential Science Indicators, he was one of the Top 10 Most Cited Researchers in the Social Sciences during the decade 1995 to 2005. The Journal of Black Issues in Higher Education,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×

ranked him as the Most Cited Black Scholar in the Social Sciences in 2008. In 2001, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences. In 2004, he received one of the inaugural Decade of Behavior Research Awards, and in 2007, he was elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Williams has been involved in the development of health policy at the national level in the United States. He has served on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and on eight committees for the IOM, including the committee that prepared the Unequal Treatment report. He has held elected and appointed positions in professional organizations, such as the American Sociological Association, the American Public Health Association, and Academy Health. He also served as a member of the of the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on Socioeconomic Status and Health. Dr. Williams has also played a visible, national leadership role in raising awareness levels of the problem of health disparities and identifying interventions to address them. From 2007, he has served as the staff director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Commission to Build a Healthier America. This national, independent, and nonpartisan health commission has focused on identifying evidence-based non-medical strategies that can improve the health of all Americans and reduce racial and socioeconomic gaps in health. With funding from the National Institutes of Health and the sponsorship of the World Health Organization, Dr. Williams also directed the South African Stress and Health Study, the first nationally representative study of the prevalence and correlates of psychiatric disorders in sub-Saharan Africa. This study assessed the effects of HIV/AIDS, exposure to racial discrimination and torture during apartheid, on the health of the South African population. He was also a key member of the team that conducted the National Study of American Life, the largest study of mental health disorders in the African American population in the United States and the first health study to include a large national sample of Blacks of Caribbean ancestry.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18659.
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Health is influenced by a wide range of factors, many of which fall outside of the health care delivery sector. These determinants of health include, for example, the characteristics of how people live, work, learn, and play. Decision and policy making in areas such as transportation, housing, and education at different levels of government, and in the private sector, can have far-reaching impacts on health. Throughout the United States there has been increasing dialogue on incorporating a health perspective into policies, programs, and projects outside the health field.

Applying a Health Lens to Decision Making in Non-Health Sectors is the summary of a workshop convened in September 2013 by the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Population Health Improvement to foster cross-sectoral dialogue and consider the opportunities for and barriers to improving the conditions for health in the course of achieving other societal objectives (e.g., economic development, efficient public transit). The roundtable engaged members, outside experts, and stakeholders on three core issues: supporting fruitful interaction between primary care and public health; strengthening governmental public health; and exploring community action in transforming the conditions that influence the public's health. This report is a discussion of health in all policies approaches to promote consideration for potential health effects in policy making in many relevant domains, such as education, transportation, and housing.

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