National Academies Press: OpenBook

DNA Technology in Forensic Science (1992)

Chapter: PARTICIPANTS

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Suggested Citation:"PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1992. DNA Technology in Forensic Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1866.
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Participants

NORMAN ARNHEIM, University of Southern California

MICHAEL BAIRD, Lifecodes Corporation

BRUCE BUDOWLE, Federal Bureau of Investigation

ROBERT M. COOK-DEEGAN, Georgetown University

ROBIN COTTON, Cellmark Diagnostics

HENRY ERLICH, Cetus Corporation

SIMON FORD

DANIEL L. HARTL, Washington University School of Medicine

ROGER KAHN, Miami Metro Dade Police Department

Y. W. KAN, University of California, San Francisco

KENNETH KIDD, Yale University

ALAN LEVY, Fort Worth Tarrant County District Attorney's Office

GARY MARX, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

LAURENCE D. MUELLER, University of California, Irvine

THOMAS H. MURRAY, Case Western Reserve University

PETER J. NEUFELD

DENNIS REEDER, National Institute of Standards and Technology

BARRY SCHECK, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law

CHARLES TAYLOR, University of California, Los Angeles

BRUCE WEIR, North Carolina State University

Suggested Citation:"PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1992. DNA Technology in Forensic Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1866.
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Suggested Citation:"PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1992. DNA Technology in Forensic Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1866.
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Page 177
Suggested Citation:"PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1992. DNA Technology in Forensic Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1866.
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Page 178
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Matching DNA samples from crime scenes and suspects is rapidly becoming a key source of evidence for use in our justice system. DNA Technology in Forensic Science offers recommendations for resolving crucial questions that are emerging as DNA typing becomes more widespread.

The volume addresses key issues:

  • Quality and reliability in DNA typing, including the introduction of new technologies, problems of standardization, and approaches to certification.
  • DNA typing in the courtroom, including issues of population genetics, levels of understanding among judges and juries, and admissibility.
  • Societal issues, such as privacy of DNA data, storage of samples and data, and the rights of defendants to quality testing technology.

Combining this original volume with the new update—The Evaluation of Forensic DNA Evidence—provides the complete, up-to-date picture of this highly important and visible topic.

This volume offers important guidance to anyone working with this emerging law enforcement tool: policymakers, specialists in criminal law, forensic scientists, geneticists, researchers, faculty, and students.

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